A phrasal verb is a combination of a verb and a preposition, a verb and an adverb, or a verb with both an adverb and a preposition.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

2
votes
3answers
324 views

'want' vs 'want for' vs 'want of'

[OED:] want {verb} = 1. a. intr. To be lacking or missing; not to exist; not to be forthcoming; to be deficient in quantity or degree. In early use const. with dative or to. rare since the 17th c., ...
3
votes
1answer
110 views

Seem small clause

It is said that the omission of "to be" is allowed only when the adjective (phrases), noun (phrases), or prepositional phrase comes after the to be like this: a He seemed (to be) angry about the ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

Does “intimate” = “imply + infer”? Or just “hint at”?

I'm not clear on how intimate (in verb form) is perceived. Until I looked it up, I never would have believed (never seen) it used with inanimate objects as subject...I thought to intimate something ...
0
votes
1answer
71 views

How did the postverbal prepositions originate in 'to treat of' and 'to treat on'?

[OED:] [2.] a. {intransitive} To deal with some matter in speech or writing; to discourse. (In quot. 1517 transf. of pictorial representation.) Const. of, formerly also on, upon. How did of or on ...
1
vote
0answers
43 views

Phrasal verb, adverb, or intransitive?

Can someone analyse this sentence for me? "Rex bit into his toy cat." (Yes, it's from 'Rex Barks'.) Is 'bit into' a phrasal verb, and 'his toy cat' the Direct Object? Or is 'into' an adverb to 'bit'...
1
vote
0answers
98 views

Phrasal verbs with synonymous opposites

There are some cases in English where one can substitute in a word that normally has an opposite meaning, but instead produces the same meaning. For examples, consider the following meanings and uses:...
0
votes
0answers
83 views

what do we say when a fever or cold has subsided and it's almost over with?

We say pick up or catch a cold when we first get it. Then when it really intensifies we say smth like "it's settled /settling in", I don't know whatever else people would say.. Anyways, when it ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

Ellipsis (Gapping) and Prepositions

A simple example of ellipsis is: Peter likes to eat apples, and Mary oranges. (Peter likes to eat apples, and Mary [likes to eat] oranges.) Recently, I've been engaged in a debate about a ...
0
votes
0answers
53 views

Subtle differences between verbs and their phrasal forms

I often read sentences that use a phrasal verb that could be replaced by the verb without the particle. As a non-native English speaker, this confuses me a lot. For example, what is the difference ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

“ever in revolt” and its grammatical role in the sentence

"It freezes the water to prevent it running to the sea; it drives the sap out of the trees till they are frozen to their mighty hearts; and most ferociously and terribly of all does the Wild harry and ...
0
votes
0answers
61 views

Opposite of 'buckle up'

If I wanted a kid in my car to fasten his/her seatbelt, I'd say 'Buckle up!'. It is an informal expression, and I'm wondering if there is a phrasal verb with the opposite meaning (to unfasten/...
0
votes
0answers
86 views

What is the difference between hand in, turn in and hand over?

What is the difference between these verbs. In which context should I use which? I think that these verbs may be interchangeable, but not all the times. For example: I turned in my homework to the ...
0
votes
0answers
57 views

Verb groups and phrasal verbs

Here's a quick one: In the (potential) verb phrase 'had competed for [gaining control]' (I know it's not very elegant) is 'competed for' a phrasal verb or does 'for' begin a prepositional group with '...
0
votes
0answers
57 views

Can the phrasal verbs “bring about” and “bring off” be used interchangeably?

please would any one of you show me the difference between these two phrasal verbs. It is kind of nuance difference as I understood at first blush. I think that I know the meaning of bring about, it ...
0
votes
0answers
47 views

How did 'of' originate in 'to conceive of'?

[OED:] [8.] d. intr. to conceive of : To form or have a conception of, think of, imagine. I'm trying to compare 'to conceive' with (the prepositional verb) 'to conceive of'. To me, both appear to ...
0
votes
0answers
217 views

phrasal verb: 'coffee up'

I want to know what phrasal verb(s) 'coffee up' (as in 'it's good to coffee up for the day') is modelled on. What does 'up' mean in such examples? I'd appreciate your help.
0
votes
0answers
205 views

Question about phrasal verbs

When looking up a word in my Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary recently, I noticed that there's a section for phrasal verbs at the end of the entry. The particular word was bow. When you take a ...
0
votes
0answers
67 views

When to use -ed or not as part of objective portion of sentence

Which one of the following usage is correct and why? I would like to have the content changed to the following: ... OR I would like to have the content change to the following: ... The ...
0
votes
0answers
286 views

Is *to see something through* a productive phrasal verb?

Some verbs in English make the use of additional particles, often called prepositions, due to the fact that they are always homophonous. I do not call them adverbs because I claim they are not always ...