A phrasal verb is a combination of a verb and a preposition, a verb and an adverb, or a verb with both an adverb and a preposition.

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What's the “textbook” way to write a passive sentence with a phrasal verb?

So, I understand that the prohibition against ending a sentence with a preposition was only ever a myth, and isn't a rule we need to follow. Still, it was a rule I was taught in school, so presumably ...
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Opposite of 'buckle up'

If I wanted a kid in my car to fasten his/her seatbelt, I'd say 'Buckle up!'. It is an informal expression, and I'm wondering if there is a phrasal verb with the opposite meaning (to ...
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when I have to use phrasal verbs [on hold]

I'm little bite confusing about phrasal verbs, when I should use them, for example, must I use "open" or "open up", "check" or "check out", I know that some phrasal verb change the meaning of the ...
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Phrasal verb “be a thing”

I’m looking for the origin of the phrasal verb “to be a thing”. It means roughly “exist” or more specifically “be recognised” or “be a phenomenon”. I first noticed it around 2008–2009. Is ...
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64 views

Difference between Keep on+V-ing and Keep+V-ing

Please help me to find out the answer. Am I right if I say I keep on walking in this dark way? or I keep walking in this dark way? What is the difference between the two sentences?
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Looking for a verb that means the same as this proverb.

After black clouds, clear weather. I'm looking for a verb for 'clear weather' here. I want to comfort someone but by using a verb that carries the meaning of this. That there will be relief and ...
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25 views

What is the difference between hand in, turn in and hand over?

What is the difference between these verbs. In which context should I use which? I think that these verbs may be interchangeable, but not all the times. For example: I turned in my homework to the ...
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1answer
37 views

Usage of “do by”

By 'do by' :- You've did wrong/ill by me. You've done ill by him by prejudging him. You're doing ill by me. You've did me ill by by what you groundlessly accused me of. Sir, you have done me wrong ...
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Can you specify the meaning of “candy over” as a phrasal verb?

As far as I know "candy" function as a noun only. However I came across this saying by Virginia Woolf "Really I don't like human nature unless all candied over with art". This phrasal verb makes me ...
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Phrasal Verbs. Rules and Tricks

Are there any rules or tricks that might explain how phrasal verbs are formed to understand their meanings?
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41 views

Kick or kick off a discussion? [closed]

When you want to say "starting a thread to discuss something", is it more correct saying "kick a discussion" or "kick off a discussion"? Thank you.
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1answer
73 views

The flexibility of phrasal verbs

1) put the phone down = put down the phone 2) put a baby down = put down a baby. 3) put an amendment down = put down an amendment. Does the preposition 'down' in those phrasal verbs have a flexible ...
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How did the postverbal prepositions originate in 'to treat of' and 'to treat on'?

[OED:] [2.] a. {intransitive} To deal with some matter in speech or writing; to discourse. (In quot. 1517 transf. of pictorial representation.) Const. of, formerly also on, upon. How did of or ...
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1answer
34 views

Phrasal verbs leftward movement

I was reading a research paper on translating multi-word items, which include phrasal verbs, and I came across a passage about phrasal verbs, by Dixon, that reads: Moreover, leftward movement will ...
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1answer
81 views

Seem small clause

It is said that the omission of "to be" is allowed only when the adjective (phrases), noun (phrases), or prepositional phrase comes after the to be like this: a He seemed (to be) angry about the ...
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61 views

which is more correct? “of my own age” or “of my same age”

I really faced that problem a lot. So, I want to end these frustrations and make it clear for me in order to improve my English Thanks in advance.
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3answers
186 views

'want' vs 'want for' vs 'want of'

[OED:] want {verb} = 1. a. intr. To be lacking or missing; not to exist; not to be forthcoming; to be deficient in quantity or degree. In early use const. with dative or to. rare since the 17th ...
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List of raw phrasal verbs

Does anyone know where I can find a phrasal verb list? Just a basic file with phrasal verbs and it doesn't have to have their meanings. Would it be better for me to have a list ordered according to ...
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1answer
58 views

Turn on vs Switch on [closed]

Which one is correct between turn on or switch on an air conditioner at home?
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meaning of camp down on someone

What does 'camp down' mean in the sentence: the army camped down on them with rape and murder? Does it connote something like attack or offend?
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What's the meaning of 'out' when it comes after a verb ?

What's the difference between a verb like read and read out or shout and shout out and so on? How does "out" change the meaning of verbs?
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1answer
39 views

What does “play in” mean in this sentence? [closed]

In the book Designing for Growth: A Design Thinking Toolkit for Managers (Google Books Link) the following sentence occurs: The designers envision several futuristic worlds to prototype for and ...
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2answers
63 views

What does “exit onto” mean? [closed]

I don't understand exit onto in the following sentences: Target is east and north of you, looks like Highway 56 to 17. Will intercept him if he stays on 17. Go east on 56 off Highway 2. What? ...
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1answer
39 views

“Joy crept into his face” vs. “Joy crept onto his face” [closed]

Please see the sentence: When he saw his grade, joy crept into/onto his face. At first glance, it seems like both could be correct, but they are not exactly synonymous. In what situation should ...
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Etymology of the phrase “goof off”

It seems clear to be an American idiom with the approximate meaning, "to waste time or procrastinate." My curiosity is about its possible relation to the Goofy, the Disney cartoon character.
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1answer
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What part of speech is “alight” in “set alight”?

In the clause it was set alight, is alight acting as adverb and modifying was set an adjective and modifying it; or something else entirely that I'm missing. I'm fairly certain that set ...
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58 views

What words can be paired with “wreak”?

I can think only of havoc. What other things can be wrought in the present tense?
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134 views

Is “keep off” considered a phrasal verb, as in “keep off the grass”?

Or is "off" simply a preposition in this case? If it's a phrasal verb, would it still be considered so in the phrase: Keep your hands off her.
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to almost meet someone at some place

Is there a common way to say in English that two people were in the same place but didn't know at the time about each other and eventually didn't meet? I know one can say they passed each other on ...
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1answer
34 views

Is “Step out from behind” a phrasal verb?

Look at these examples: He stepped out from behind the curtain. Step out from behind the counter. Step out from behind the blue wall. Step out from behind the veil of illusion.
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1answer
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Which is correct? log in, log on, log into, log onto [duplicate]

I've seen different questions related to the same verb, but those questions implicate an imperative form (For example when you tell somebody to log in/on) which I think may vary the condition in which ...
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92 views

Is “rub on” a phrasal verb or not?

I think the following sentences are all grammatical. So I am wondering whether there is a phrasal verb "rub on" that has the same meaning as "rub"-as-a-transitive-verb. If there is no phrasal verb, ...
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1answer
36 views

Phrasal verbs for stop working at the end of the day

I want to ask my friend when she will leave the office at the end of the day. I have found two phrasal verbs for this purpose. Knock off and get off What time do you knock off work? What time do ...
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60 views

Turn up vs Come up - Appear? [closed]

Turn up and Come up are able to mean "appear"? When can I use come up or turn up?
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1answer
113 views

The meaning of 'take over' in this sentence

I've recently watched a youtube video where a person mentioned a phrase 'It's pretty much taken over my Instragram'. I think she meant 'The pictures are taken over.' I tried to find out all of the ...
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Origin of phrasal verb “love on”

Lately I've been hearing friends talk about loving on people. Here's an example of the sort of thing they'll say: We should be working in the streets and loving on the homeless. Forge ...
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2answers
56 views

Is “to pass away” used for non-humans?

Is it OK to use pass away for an animal/pet, or it is just for human? If it doesn't sound OK, what should be used instead, died?
5
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1answer
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Kinds of trips and their verbs

There is an exercise in a book I use which asks students to put the words for the kinds of trips in a chart, under three columns: Go, Take and Go on a/an. The problem is that after students do it, the ...
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Usage of “track down”

I recently read (in a website) the following sentence. (I replaced the usernames with placeholders.) [username1], if this is still happening, there is a good chance your IP got blocked due to ...
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2answers
76 views

Origins of the phrasal verb “to fall asleep”.

I have been googling around, searching for the origins of the phrasal verb "to fall asleep" but so far I have found no references. I was wondering specifically why we use the verb "to fall" to ...
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1answer
31 views

Dealing with “dealing with”. [closed]

I am writing an academic paper, and I don't know which of the two forms are more suitable and/or correct. "The question should be dealt with using different tools and methods." or "The question ...
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52 views

Verb groups and phrasal verbs

Here's a quick one: In the (potential) verb phrase 'had competed for [gaining control]' (I know it's not very elegant) is 'competed for' a phrasal verb or does 'for' begin a prepositional group with ...
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2answers
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The phrase “Check out”

"Check out this article" Where did this term come from and why those choice of words? I understand it perfectly semantically, but when you think about it it doesn't make sense, check out seems to ...
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“Replace with” versus “replace by”

I often see "replace with" and "replace by" used interchangeably, but this doesn't sound right to me: I replaced that component by this one. I would use "with" in such a sentence. "By" only ...
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2answers
429 views

How does 'be' + 'of' combine to mean 'possess; give rise to'?

I already understand and so ask NOT about the definition, below which I want to burrow. I heed the Etymological Fallacy. 1. Which ODO definition corresponds? What does of mean here? to be of = ...
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Preposition to use with the phrase “come to an understanding”

So, I'm to translate a sentence to English. It's something like: We've succeeded in coming to an understanding ______ all questions discussed. I suppose that I should use either about or in to ...
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3answers
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Is “out” a preposition or an adverb in these sentences?

Is out a preposition or an adverb in these sentences? "We need to get the hell out of this place." "We need to get out and leave this place."
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2answers
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treading a path

"He trod a path" This sentence seems to have two different meanings: 1. He walked (through the grass, for example) and his heavy steps shaped a path. 2. He walked along a path. I would like to know if ...
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The role of preposition “out” in relation to a verb [closed]

I am already aware that a preposition after a verb turns it to a phrasal verb, which happens to almost have a completely different meaning from the verb alone. However, I noticed a very frequent usage ...