A phrasal verb is a combination of a verb and a preposition, a verb and an adverb, or a verb with both an adverb and a preposition.

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Usage of “track down”

I recently read (in a website) the following sentence. (I replaced the usernames with placeholders.) [username1], if this is still happening, there is a good chance your IP got blocked due to ...
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34 views

What does “take out your book” mean? [on hold]

What does this phrase mean? "take out your book" Because I have found no relevant meaning of take+out as a phrasal verb in the online dictionaries. Can any one help me?
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390 views

A formal phrasal verb for “continue to stick to their belief”

How do I rewrite the following sentence so it is more formal, using a phrasal verb in place of the part in bold? Despite mounting evidence, they continue to stick to their belief.
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5answers
291 views

Specific word/phrase/idiom for the following scenario

I have a second cousin living at the end of my street, but we hardly meet. I plan to meet her soon and tell her to come out and go out for a walk. Could anyone suggest a phrase, word, or an idiom ...
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1answer
79 views

“I will call you back” instead of “I will call back you” Why? [duplicate]

Why "I will call you back" instead of "I will call back you"? Here "call back" is a phrasal verb, and "back" is a particle. Then why are we separating the particle? Is there any rule for it?
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89 views

“Bring down X” vs. “bring X down” [duplicate]

I am unable to understand the difference between these two sentences: I want him to bring down the opponents. I want him to bring the opponents down. Which is right and when should each ...
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3answers
470 views

Meaning of “go down” [closed]

What's the meaning of go down? Little did anyone know, the 47-year-old Silicon Valley executive was actually engaged in a giant scam...He was finally caught by Target security on May 8, and he was ...
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4answers
238 views

To retroactively create?

Is there a verb that means "retroactively create"? For example: John wanted to retroactively create a relationship with his estranged father. I'm not looking for a word that means ...
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1answer
2k views

“Get up” vs. “wake up” [closed]

I am not a native English speaker. Whet I get up late in the morning, I get to inform my office that I am late for that particular day. And I am always confused if I should use "I just got up" or "I ...
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3answers
595 views

Meaning of “dance out” [closed]

What does the following phrase mean? Robert danced his way out the prison. Does it mean that Robert succeeded in leaving the prison? Or that Robert danced while leaving the prison? A similar ...
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1answer
535 views

Can one use “known from” as “known for”?

I wonder if we can use the form "known from" instead of "known for" (saving the same meaning, of course). For example: "NY is known from its beautiful Empire State Building" instead of "NY is known ...
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1answer
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what is the difference between “hook up with” and “have sex with”? [closed]

I would like to know the subtle difference between hook up and have sex. I'm asking because hook up seems have a subtly different meaning than have sex: in the situations I've heard this word it seems ...
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1answer
583 views

What are the main differences between AmE and BrE phrasal verbs? [closed]

What are the main differences between AmE and BrE phrasal verbs? It seems to me that BrE uses more phrasal verbs than AmE and that the particle of the phrasal verb changes sometimes from AmE to BrE ...
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1answer
215 views

Contextual meaning of “run out of” [closed]

This is from CSI NY. Two investigators are examining a victim's body. Joe: Well, I almost ran out of here. Any idea who she is? Mic: No. Definitely doesn't work in the lab.
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1answer
848 views

What does “switch off” mean? [closed]

I read a blog post which includes the following sentence: I hear many PhD students say they feel stressed because they can’t switch off. What does the term switch off mean in the sentence above? ...
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1answer
153 views

Meaning of the phrasal verb “to dart at”

There was the poor bear, spluttering away in the water, and trying his hardest to swim whilst the goldfish darted at him in fury. What does to dart at mean in this context? Does it mean "attack"? ...
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1answer
85 views

Shred off heat? [closed]

I heard a phrase which I'm not sure it's this but I liked it. It was a classical radio station in Southern California. It was a hot day and radio was playing a song about ice and snow, and the ...