A phrasal verb is a combination of a verb and a preposition, a verb and an adverb, or a verb with both an adverb and a preposition.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

4
votes
3answers
414 views

Meaning of “run around doing something”

What does run around doing something mean? For example: I can't see any reason to run around deleting the recovery partition.
-1
votes
3answers
2k views

Usage of “track down”

I recently read (in a website) the following sentence. (I replaced the usernames with placeholders.) [username1], if this is still happening, there is a good chance your IP got blocked due to ...
4
votes
2answers
4k views

What does “scratch below the surface” mean?

In Outlier: The Story of Success Chapter 2 Section 4, there is a sentence saying Is the ten-thousand-hour rule a general rule of success? If we scratch below the surface of every great achiever, ...
18
votes
7answers
19k views

Why “go off”, as in “alarm went off”?

I was wondering why does something goes off, when it in fact does the opposite bomb goes off - it blows up alarm goes off - it turns on Why not goes on?
1
vote
2answers
220 views

What's the difference between “shake up” and “shape up”?

What's the difference between these phrasal verbs? Would you say "organization shake up", "organization shape up", either depending on context and desired meaning or neither? How about "documentation" ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

What does “urge to kill” mean?

I've got an answer to my comment at Stack Overflow, and I don't get what it means. I've googled and looked over several dictionaries with no help. Seems like it is some specific slang/phrasal verb, ...
8
votes
3answers
34k views

“Give up” versus “give in”

Do give up and give in imply different meanings?
4
votes
5answers
2k views

Should we say “borrow from” instead of “borrow off”?

I hear and read the term "borrow off" frequently however I say "borrow from" as that makes more sense to me. Is it grammatically incorrect to say, "may I borrow the book off your friend"? In my mind ...
6
votes
3answers
3k views

Why do we use 'up' as adverbs for verbs?

Why do we use up as adverbs for verbs? For example, 'wake up', 'throw up', etc.
6
votes
2answers
188 views

Which would be correct: “outputs” or “puts out”?

Which word should I use in the following context? Is the required before data? Any algorithm first reads data, processes (the) data and finally [outputs|puts out] the processed data.
14
votes
4answers
29k views

“Fill out a form” or “fill in a form”

Does one fill out a form or does one fill in a form? I've gotten different answers from the people I've asked. Google search results: fill in a form — 14,200,000 fill out a form — ...
7
votes
4answers
672 views

How can I learn to get collocations right?

I read an article about collocation which includes an example: We can say highly sophisticated, and we can say extremely happy. highly happy and extremely sophisticated would be wrong. How can I ...
5
votes
3answers
15k views

“Differ to”, “differ with” or “differ from”

In what ways are differ to, differ with and differ from different? Providing examples would be really appreciated.
5
votes
5answers
7k views

Is there any difference between “talk to someone” and “talk with someone”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Speak to” vs. “Speak with” Well, the question is in the title. I always had the impression that "talk to someone" refers to situations when some ...
11
votes
6answers
8k views

“Speak to” vs. “Speak with”

What are the differences between these two phrasal verbs and what are the best situations to use each?
9
votes
7answers
16k views

How can I explain to people that the phrase “off of ” is grammatically incorrect?

How can I explain to people that the phrase off of is grammatically incorrect? I‘ve heard this phrase used a lot, especially by Americans (though they aren't the only ones). In my understanding, ...
57
votes
6answers
65k views

“Login” or “log in”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “log in to” or “log into” or “login to” Is there accepted terminology for the process of logging in? As a verb, would you say "Go to ...