3
votes
3answers
118 views

Adverb for a person who is not the subject

If I went home and was happy to do so, I can say that "I went home happily". If I sent somebody else home and he was happy to do so, can I say that "I sent Johnny home happily"? This doesn't sound ...
2
votes
2answers
128 views

A word meaning “To bring out of retirement” / “To bring back into use”

(Re)instate? -- Seems too specific. (Re-)employ? -- Seems to apply to both machines and people, which is useful. But re-employ seems too general. Activate? -- Seems most appropriate perhaps, although ...
3
votes
1answer
730 views

Term for verb+adverb with distinct meaning

There are verbs that, when paired with certain adverbs, can have a distinctly different meaning. For example, I looked up the word in the dictionary. The phrase looked up functions as a verb ...
1
vote
1answer
956 views

“Sent” vs “sent off” vs “sent out”

When do we use one over another? I sent a letter. I sent off a letter. I sent out a letter. Here I found a similar topic but I am still confused. sent = sent to one or more people ...
1
vote
2answers
713 views

Is there any difference between “stoop down” and “stoop”?

According to Longman, they are the same, but I wonder if this is correct or if so, which one is more common. For example: Dave stooped down to tie his shoes. Dave stooped to tie his shoes. ...
28
votes
2answers
7k views

What is the difference between “maybe” and “may be”?

What is the difference in meaning and usage between maybe and may be? Are they synonymous?
6
votes
3answers
3k views

Why do we use 'up' as adverbs for verbs?

Why do we use up as adverbs for verbs? For example, 'wake up', 'throw up', etc.
7
votes
4answers
642 views

How can I learn to get collocations right?

I read an article about collocation which includes an example: We can say highly sophisticated, and we can say extremely happy. highly happy and extremely sophisticated would be wrong. How can I ...