A phrasal verb is a combination of a verb and a preposition, a verb and an adverb, or a verb with both an adverb and a preposition.

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Opposite of 'buckle up'

If I wanted a kid in my car to fasten his/her seatbelt, I'd say 'Buckle up!'. It is an informal expression, and I'm wondering if there is a phrasal verb with the opposite meaning (to ...
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when I have to use phrasal verbs [closed]

I'm little bite confusing about phrasal verbs, when I should use them, for example, must I use "open" or "open up", "check" or "check out", I know that some phrasal verb change the meaning of the ...
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2answers
66 views

Difference between Keep on+V-ing and Keep+V-ing

Please help me to find out the answer. Am I right if I say I keep on walking in this dark way? or I keep walking in this dark way? What is the difference between the two sentences?
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82 views

Looking for a verb that means the same as this proverb.

After black clouds, clear weather. I'm looking for a verb for 'clear weather' here. I want to comfort someone but by using a verb that carries the meaning of this. That there will be relief and ...
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26 views

What is the difference between hand in, turn in and hand over?

What is the difference between these verbs. In which context should I use which? I think that these verbs may be interchangeable, but not all the times. For example: I turned in my homework to the ...
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49 views

Can you specify the meaning of “candy over” as a phrasal verb?

As far as I know "candy" function as a noun only. However I came across this saying by Virginia Woolf "Really I don't like human nature unless all candied over with art". This phrasal verb makes me ...
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37 views

Usage of “do by”

By 'do by' :- You've did wrong/ill by me. You've done ill by him by prejudging him. You're doing ill by me. You've did me ill by by what you groundlessly accused me of. Sir, you have done me wrong ...
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41 views

Kick or kick off a discussion? [closed]

When you want to say "starting a thread to discuss something", is it more correct saying "kick a discussion" or "kick off a discussion"? Thank you.
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35 views

Phrasal verbs leftward movement

I was reading a research paper on translating multi-word items, which include phrasal verbs, and I came across a passage about phrasal verbs, by Dixon, that reads: Moreover, leftward movement will ...
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62 views

which is more correct? “of my own age” or “of my same age”

I really faced that problem a lot. So, I want to end these frustrations and make it clear for me in order to improve my English Thanks in advance.
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37 views

List of raw phrasal verbs

Does anyone know where I can find a phrasal verb list? Just a basic file with phrasal verbs and it doesn't have to have their meanings. Would it be better for me to have a list ordered according to ...
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1answer
59 views

Turn on vs Switch on [closed]

Which one is correct between turn on or switch on an air conditioner at home?
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1answer
40 views

What does “play in” mean in this sentence? [closed]

In the book Designing for Growth: A Design Thinking Toolkit for Managers (Google Books Link) the following sentence occurs: The designers envision several futuristic worlds to prototype for and ...
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63 views

What does “exit onto” mean? [closed]

I don't understand exit onto in the following sentences: Target is east and north of you, looks like Highway 56 to 17. Will intercept him if he stays on 17. Go east on 56 off Highway 2. What? ...
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1answer
40 views

“Joy crept into his face” vs. “Joy crept onto his face” [closed]

Please see the sentence: When he saw his grade, joy crept into/onto his face. At first glance, it seems like both could be correct, but they are not exactly synonymous. In what situation should ...
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2answers
56 views

Etymology of the phrase “goof off”

It seems clear to be an American idiom with the approximate meaning, "to waste time or procrastinate." My curiosity is about its possible relation to the Goofy, the Disney cartoon character.
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1answer
62 views

What part of speech is “alight” in “set alight”?

In the clause it was set alight, is alight acting as adverb and modifying was set an adjective and modifying it; or something else entirely that I'm missing. I'm fairly certain that set ...
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1answer
58 views

What words can be paired with “wreak”?

I can think only of havoc. What other things can be wrought in the present tense?
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2answers
58 views

to almost meet someone at some place

Is there a common way to say in English that two people were in the same place but didn't know at the time about each other and eventually didn't meet? I know one can say they passed each other on ...
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1answer
34 views

Is “Step out from behind” a phrasal verb?

Look at these examples: He stepped out from behind the curtain. Step out from behind the counter. Step out from behind the blue wall. Step out from behind the veil of illusion.
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111 views

Which is correct? log in, log on, log into, log onto [duplicate]

I've seen different questions related to the same verb, but those questions implicate an imperative form (For example when you tell somebody to log in/on) which I think may vary the condition in which ...
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3answers
134 views

Is “keep off” considered a phrasal verb, as in “keep off the grass”?

Or is "off" simply a preposition in this case? If it's a phrasal verb, would it still be considered so in the phrase: Keep your hands off her.
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1answer
37 views

Phrasal verbs for stop working at the end of the day

I want to ask my friend when she will leave the office at the end of the day. I have found two phrasal verbs for this purpose. Knock off and get off What time do you knock off work? What time do ...
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63 views

Turn up vs Come up - Appear? [closed]

Turn up and Come up are able to mean "appear"? When can I use come up or turn up?
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87 views

What's the “textbook” way to write a passive sentence with a phrasal verb?

So, I understand that the prohibition against ending a sentence with a preposition was only ever a myth, and isn't a rule we need to follow. Still, it was a rule I was taught in school, so presumably ...
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1answer
116 views

The meaning of 'take over' in this sentence

I've recently watched a youtube video where a person mentioned a phrase 'It's pretty much taken over my Instragram'. I think she meant 'The pictures are taken over.' I tried to find out all of the ...
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81 views

Seem small clause

It is said that the omission of "to be" is allowed only when the adjective (phrases), noun (phrases), or prepositional phrase comes after the to be like this: a He seemed (to be) angry about the ...
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56 views

Is “to pass away” used for non-humans?

Is it OK to use pass away for an animal/pet, or it is just for human? If it doesn't sound OK, what should be used instead, died?
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Origins of the phrasal verb “to fall asleep”.

I have been googling around, searching for the origins of the phrasal verb "to fall asleep" but so far I have found no references. I was wondering specifically why we use the verb "to fall" to ...
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31 views

Dealing with “dealing with”. [closed]

I am writing an academic paper, and I don't know which of the two forms are more suitable and/or correct. "The question should be dealt with using different tools and methods." or "The question ...
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52 views

Verb groups and phrasal verbs

Here's a quick one: In the (potential) verb phrase 'had competed for [gaining control]' (I know it's not very elegant) is 'competed for' a phrasal verb or does 'for' begin a prepositional group with ...
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92 views

Preposition to use with the phrase “come to an understanding”

So, I'm to translate a sentence to English. It's something like: We've succeeded in coming to an understanding ______ all questions discussed. I suppose that I should use either about or in to ...
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2answers
72 views

treading a path

"He trod a path" This sentence seems to have two different meanings: 1. He walked (through the grass, for example) and his heavy steps shaped a path. 2. He walked along a path. I would like to know if ...
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62 views

The role of preposition “out” in relation to a verb [closed]

I am already aware that a preposition after a verb turns it to a phrasal verb, which happens to almost have a completely different meaning from the verb alone. However, I noticed a very frequent usage ...
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the meaning of “hunt for” similar to “look for” in the sentence I mentioned

If your dog were lost, would you say "I'll hunt for my puppy."? It sounds odd to me though dictionaries all say that "hunt for" is similar to "look for" in the meaning. Thanks a lot for answering me:) ...
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991 views

Why are we in love “with” someone?

I'd like to learn the etymology of using the preposition with in the phrase in love with somebody. For me it doesn't make much sense because with seems to imply something that is shared by two people, ...
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99 views

The Expression “Drop it.” Stop talking about it

There are some phrasal verbs with drop, such as: Drop in Drop by Drop off Drop out etc... I saw the expression "Just drop it" used in a movie to express 'stop talking about it'. I'm just curious ...
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73 views

The flexibility of phrasal verbs

1) put the phone down = put down the phone 2) put a baby down = put down a baby. 3) put an amendment down = put down an amendment. Does the preposition 'down' in those phrasal verbs have a flexible ...
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137 views

“Bring up a topic” or “bring up a subject”? [closed]

If I start speaking about something, do I "bring up the topic of [sth.]" or "bring up the subject of [sth.]"?
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95 views

Is “ran after” a phrasal verb?

I'm having some difficulty parsing this sentence: "The old beggar ran after the rich man." Is the verb "ran" (intransitive) with no object, or is it "ran after" (transitive) with the object ...
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197 views

Kinds of trips and their verbs

There is an exercise in a book I use which asks students to put the words for the kinds of trips in a chart, under three columns: Go, Take and Go on a/an. The problem is that after students do it, the ...
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55 views

meaning of camp down on someone

What does 'camp down' mean in the sentence: the army camped down on them with rape and murder? Does it connote something like attack or offend?
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4answers
615 views

Meaning of “get somebody back”?

Recently, I've heard that someone said "get him back". I'm not sure about the exact meaning though I can guess some. Could you please explain the meaning?
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6answers
185 views

Cold containers don't sweat—what do they do?

In warm, humid climates: If you take a container of something (say, a can of Coke or a jar of mayonnaise) and leave it at room temperature, the outside becomes wet with droplets of water— sometimes ...
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640 views

Which is correct, “be proceeded” or “be processed” (used in business letter)

Which usage (be proceed/be processed) is correct in the following sentence? (This is written in a business letter) Are there any differences between these two words? Thanks a lot! Please be noted ...
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meaning of as - as in following sentence [duplicate]

"The Plaza hotel is as near as it gets to the best shopping along New York's famous Fifth Avenue." Whats the meaning of this sentence?and what does as-as means here?
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97 views

'not fool enough to dance on the old strings', is it an idiom? This phrase is from 'The Invisible Man' by H.G Wells

In the book of 'The Invisible Man' by Wells, there is this sentence; "Kemp, you're not fool enough to dance on the old strings. Can't you see my position?" In this particular scene, Griffin(the ...
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78 views

cut / cut down * cut down on

I never know when to use "cut down on", "cut down" or just "cut". Some sentences I've come across: They are trying to cut street crime in the area. [Would "cut down on street crime" be ok?] You ...
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Can the phrasal verbs “bring about” and “bring off” be used interchangeably?

please would any one of you show me the difference between these two phrasal verbs. It is kind of nuance difference as I understood at first blush. I think that I know the meaning of bring about, it ...
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Difference between “go” and “go down” or “grill” and “grill down” [closed]

I found a phrasal verb while I was reading my book but I didn't know its meaning. Well , I am going down to the park with some friends. We are going to grill some steaks down there. Why ...