A phrasal verb is a combination of a verb and a preposition, a verb and an adverb, or a verb with both an adverb and a preposition.

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97 views

Word for a problem that goes away when a larger thing changes?

What is a word or expression for a problem has effectively gone away because of a larger change that makes the problem no longer a problem? I'm thinking "obviated" or "made unnecessary," but it ...
4
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11answers
733 views

How to describe a person in a situation in which he does not completely know what he is doing?

How can we describe a person doing or communicating something without (really) knowing what he is doing or talking about? This could be either because of some indisposition like for example ...
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1answer
38 views

Keep up v. keep up with

Keep up generally means maintain a steady pace or maintain the height/production of something, but it seems sometimes keep up can appear without it's handy "with". Compare the following: 1. You need ...
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4answers
69 views

What should be the opposite of “going out”

I know it seems to be a simple answer but that's why I'm asking what should be, not what is. Going out is composed of two words, obviously. Each of these has its opposite. So if I were to take the ...
1
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1answer
26 views

Should we split “call together” & “gather together”?

When an organization sends invitations to companies for a planned conference, the verbs "gather together" and "call together" seem to be interchangable in this context. Should the object stay between ...
0
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1answer
37 views

Can verb 'grant' be used with preposition 'with?'

Could someone explain to me if the word 'grant' can be used with 'with' and what it means? (I checked with many dictionaries, but couldn't find an example used in that way.) example sentence in an ...
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0answers
52 views

phrasal verb: 'coffee up'

I want to know what phrasal verb(s) 'coffee up' (as in 'it's good to coffee up for the day') is modelled on. What does 'up' mean in such examples? I'd appreciate your help.
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2answers
54 views

Is saying “back to back” an AmE or BrE usage [duplicate]

I have been often intrigued by the phrase "back-to-back". Referring to "back" is reminiscent of the rear of the human body. I usually hear- back-to-back meetings
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1answer
32 views

requirements about or requirements for [closed]

i try to build a phrase in the context of Master application : We said : let me know if there are further requirements for my application . or let me know if there are further ...
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1answer
39 views

Difference between “turns out” and “turns out to be”

I'm not a native English speaker, hence I'm a little confused here. I want to know the difference between the two and also correct me if I'm saying it wrong here "It's turns out to be a conspiracy ...
2
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3answers
90 views

Word, expression for copying someone who inspires you

All of us have a person; our elder siblings or friends or any one who we are inspired by. For example my elder sister, I love the way she carries herself, her personality, her poise, that I try my ...
0
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2answers
55 views

Expressions or phrasal verbs for very boring

In AE, how could I say something is very boring? I know teenagers would say "it sucks" but is there anything else, phrasal verbs or expressions? If it's something local, I would also ask you to say ...
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3answers
58 views

Opposite of “to put off”

Is there any word, expression or phrasal verb I can use that has the opposite meaning of "put off"? The case I have in mind is this: The meeting would be on saturday, but a lot of things have ...
0
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1answer
49 views

How to construct acceptable phrasal verbs [closed]

Native speakers using Phrasal Verbs very frequently, because it can express a lot of meanings. but Is there any rule that I can follow to construct acceptable phrasal verbs?
2
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1answer
727 views

Difference between What are you up for tonight vs What are you up to tonight?

I wonder if my understanding of the meanings implied in these sentences is right. Besides, I would like to know how common they are in every day English and whether they can be used interchangeably ...
2
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4answers
299 views

Point someone to something

Is it correct to write something along the lines of "She pointed me to a book of X." in the sense of "making me aware of it", "bringing it to my attention"?
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3answers
120 views

What is a formal word meaning “paid off”?

I can not think of any way to say paid off in a formal way. Susan’s speech and struggle during those rough times has _______.
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4answers
62 views

To get on someone [closed]

My English is not very good as it is my second language, so I need a little help here. A cousin of mine came to my place to attend my sister's wedding. In our culture, bride to be is not supposed to ...
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0answers
46 views

Question about phrasal verbs

When looking up a word in my Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary recently, I noticed that there's a section for phrasal verbs at the end of the entry. The particular word was bow. When you take a ...
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1answer
52 views

Difference between 'get at' and 'get on at'

E.g. 'My boss is always getting on at me even if I haven't done anything wrong.' 'Her parents keep getting at her for skipping classes.' I'm wondering whether these phrasal verbs have ...
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1answer
52 views

What is the meaning of “gassed for”? [closed]

I was reading a comment on ELU and it is... ... when you've been gassed for your oral surgery. Is it an idiomatic thing to say "gassed for or gassed up"?
2
votes
1answer
100 views

A song came on tv

I'm not a native English speaker, so I wanted to ask something. How would you say that 'As i was zapping through the channels, and this song came on'. Is this a correct sentence? Basically what I ...
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1answer
66 views

Why it is not possible to put a noun object after the particle when the object refers to a person with some phrasal verbs ? Is there a specific rule?

For example: X pulled off the sweater or X pulled the sweater off but let someone off the hook not let off the hook someone to knock over the car or to knock the car over and to knock the child ...
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0answers
18 views

When to use -ed or not as part of objective portion of sentence

Which one of the following usage is correct and why? I would like to have the content changed to the following: ... OR I would like to have the content change to the following: ... The ...
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2answers
107 views

What does “Back on for today” mean?

I received the following email from a colleague, who is a native speaker of American English: Back on for today. Starting at [10:00]. What does "back on for today" mean?
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1answer
64 views

What does “the take-up” mean?

I couldn't find the proper meaning in the dictionaries. Could anyone explain to me what does the author mean by "the take-up" here in this excerpt? There has been a trend towards setting the ...
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1answer
26 views

Brush up on as a Tri-Part

Is "brush up on" technically a tri-part phrasal verb?
2
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2answers
49 views

Sit v. sit down

I seriously cannot find any good, thorough responses to this question, and I'm trying to help out a non-native friend. Sit down implies motion. I understand that because of the preposition "down". ...
2
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2answers
181 views

“Don't fall in anger”, I heard you say

If the phrase rang a bell, it's because the actual Oasis song lyric is "Don't look back in anger", I heard you say. But did my question title sound very strange or only slightly off? I might argue ...
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0answers
59 views

Is *to see something through* a productive phrasal verb?

Some verbs in English make the use of additional particles, often called prepositions, due to the fact that they are always homophonous. I do not call them adverbs because I claim they are not always ...
0
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3answers
61 views

Throw a ball up versus Throw up a ball

For the phrasal verb to throw something up, as it to toss an object in the air, is this sentence OK, or is it interpreted as John vomiting out a ball? (I) John threw up a ball My intuition is that ...
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1answer
89 views

How does 'be' + 'of' combine to mean 'possess; give rise to'?

I already understand and so ask NOT about the definition, below which I want to burrow. I heed the Etymological Fallacy. 1. Which ODO definition corresponds? What does of mean here? to be of = ...
10
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7answers
1k views

Is “to boil down” formal enough to be used in scientific writing? [closed]

The phrase to boil down to something can be found in most dictionaries. However, to me, it sounds colloquial to write Finding an exact solution to Eq. 1 boils down to ... A real-life ...
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2answers
1k views

“Start to Inf.” vs. “start V-ing” [duplicate]

I want to know about usage of "start + action" and "stop + action". Which one of followin are correct or preferred? For ex. When shall I start working? When shall I stop working? Or ...
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3answers
65 views

Use of Phrasal Verb 'Yearn for'

I'd like to ask if the following sentence is grammatically correct: It is a rare luxury yearned for by even those who have it all. I am especially concerned with the usage of the phrasal verb ...
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0answers
23 views

"The experience remained stamped on her memory for many years

"The experience remained stamped on her memory for many years. Could that be possible to use a phrasal verb after a verb just like this sentence above?
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1answer
134 views

Is the phrasal verb “sober up” interchangeable with “sober down”

I understand that phrasal verbs are extremely idiosyncratic. If I have to replace -Sober up or calm down, would sober down be an appropriate choice, and a formal alternative. Edit: Or can i ...
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2answers
136 views

Are “bear someone out” and “back someone up” sometimes interchangeable?

Back up - v.tr - to support Bear out - v.tr - to prove right or justified, confirm, corroborate. In the following sentences, are "bear someone out" and "back someone up" perfectly ...
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1answer
146 views

Meaning of “cross-reference against” [closed]

What does it mean if one thing is "cross referenced against" the other? Like the following example: Each story is cross-referenced against the other.
1
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1answer
73 views

allow for vs. note [closed]

Take account of in Collins American Dictionary: ​1. to take into consideration; allow for ​2. to take notice of; note Would you simply tell me what the difference is between 1 and 2?
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1answer
57 views

“Stands for” direction?

In the song YOLO I heard the lyric "You oughta look out also stands for YOLO." I thought that the correct usage of "stands for" with acronyms was only the "[acronym] stands for [meaning]" direction. ...
1
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1answer
697 views

Lights go out or go off? [duplicate]

I don't understand why they say "One by one, the street lights went out leaving us in total darkness." Why there can't be "...the street lights went off..."? I have looked it up in dictionary; "go ...
1
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4answers
119 views

Can a symmetry be “broken down” (to a lower symmetry)?

Background Symmetries are a key concept in physics, and describe the invariance of a system under certain operations (for example, rotation). Breaking a symmetry refers to modifying the system in a ...
0
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1answer
37 views

precede versus take precedence of

I would like to describe the relationship between two start dates. I have been repeatedly using "start date of A precede the start date of B." I am wondering if an alternative expression "start date ...
1
vote
4answers
519 views

Do we hang up a telephone call, or just “hang up”? [closed]

I have to announce a message on a call that is like this Alert!! There is an alarm from the system,to disarm the system, press 5, to ignore this call , hang up!! Is this OK? should I use hang ...
3
votes
2answers
130 views

What preposition should be used with “cache”?

Which is most grammatical? It's still cached to your phone. It's still cached in your phone. It's still cached on your phone. I find myself gravitating towards "to" but I'm not sure - ...
0
votes
2answers
106 views

“Blinds us to” or “blinds us from”?

I see these phrases sometimes: "blinds us from" and "blinds us to". Which form is correct? The whole sentence would be something like "blinds us from the truth".
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votes
1answer
317 views

What does “take out your book” mean? [closed]

What does this phrase mean? "take out your book" Because I have found no relevant meaning of take+out as a phrasal verb in the online dictionaries. Can any one help me?
1
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2answers
578 views

Tidy up - put things in order

According to English WordNet, tidy up has a meaning: put (things or places) in order: "Tidy up your room!" I feel comfortable with the use of "Tidy up your room!" However, what is the exact ...
0
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3answers
225 views

Finish off your meal, or finish up your meal?

In the situation where you want to tell a kid about the expected order of activities, which phrasal verb is correct? You have to finish off your meal before you may watch the movie. or You have to ...