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11
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1answer
1k views

Fractions as phrasal (compound) adjectives

Is there a difference between a written-out fraction that serves as a noun: He gave me one half of his sandwich. and a written-out fraction serving as an adjective: I gave her a one-half ...
7
votes
5answers
577 views

Is ‘suit-wearing’ an adjective sui generis?

I was interested to find the term, “Occupy Wall Street’s suit-wearing cousin” appearing in a May 31 New York Times article titled Facing down the Bankers. It begins with the following line: ...
7
votes
2answers
3k views

“Dead simple..” vs. “Really simple..”

I'm writing copy for a new web application and I'm having some trouble with it. On one headline I've written "It's dead simple ...", but while my client was reviewing it he asked if this is not too '...
5
votes
4answers
620 views

Is “purse-lipped mother-in-law” an established word representing for a woman who is censoriousness and nagging about everything?

I found an interesting phrase, “purse-lipped mother-in-law” in the following lines of the article titled “The newspaper that rules Britain,” which appeared in New Yorker magazine, April 2nd, 2012 ...
5
votes
1answer
3k views

Differences between “inasmuch as” vs “as much as”

Can anyone provide me with some examples illustrating the differences between mentioned adjectives. Is it possible to use them interchangeably on various occasions?
4
votes
1answer
107 views

I threw a coin in a well that [was] or [is] in the forest [duplicate]

Which statement is correct and why? I threw a coin in a well that was in the forest. vs I threw a coin in a well that is in the forest. Also, is the "is/was" before "in the forest" called a ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Awkwardness around 'go live' phrase [closed]

Context: software company training documents. We commonly use the phrase "go live" when talking about making a system operational. I'm fine with using it as two separate words, but it becomes awkward ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

“Italy-based company” or “Italian-based company”

When referring to a company that is based in Italy, I am never sure which of the above is correct. Logically speaking, "Italy-based" seems the most appropriate (since the company is based in Italy, ...
3
votes
4answers
294 views

Quote positioning on a long sarcastic-explanation phrase

In the following excerpt, would it be more correct to close the quotation after "pose"? ...and they stand in the ISO-standard "security man waiting for you to walk through the door so he can ...
3
votes
3answers
502 views

“Hardware-counter-based tools” or “hardware-counter based tools”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicates: Chainsaw-equipped or chainsaw equipped? How to connect a word and a phrase with a hyphen? "One-Day Only Promotion" or "One-Day-Only Promotion" Which ...
3
votes
2answers
220 views

a person with a fossilized mind

How to describe a person who have a fossilized mind? whatever he hears he will not (get it into one's head)
3
votes
2answers
731 views

What is the adjective form of “black humo(u)r”?

If one were to describe a statement by referring to "black humour", how should he/she go about forming the adjectival form of the term? "blackly humourous" or "black humourous"
3
votes
3answers
658 views

article heading should be “Experiment setup” or “Experimental setup”?

My advisor insists on using a heading "Experimental Setup" in his science journal articles. I always cringed a little, thinking it should be "Experiment setup" instead. Now I am writing an article and ...
3
votes
2answers
236 views

How are compound adjectives nominalised?

There are compound adjectives in which each word is inflected (as adjective). When they are nominalised, should each adjective be separately nominalised or only the ultimate word? The concrete ...
3
votes
2answers
100 views

Is there a name for somebody you’re jealous of?

I'm trying to describe King Saul's suicide out of fear of his rival David, of-whom-he-is-jealous. Is there a better way to describe this?
3
votes
1answer
110 views

Seem small clause

It is said that the omission of "to be" is allowed only when the adjective (phrases), noun (phrases), or prepositional phrase comes after the to be like this: a He seemed (to be) angry about the ...
2
votes
3answers
527 views

Different types of “pride”

At one point while browsing the internet I came across an article that had wonderful adjectives for the different types of pride one can feel. Unfortunately I didn't bookmark it, and I can't find it! ...
2
votes
2answers
381 views

Is it acceptable to italicize a compound descriptor instead of hyphenating it?

I'm having a disagreement about how to treat a compound descriptor like "This is one of those everyone-shut-up-and-go-away kind of days." It has been claimed to me that this descriptor can just as ...
2
votes
1answer
100 views

What is the correct usage: In the morning vs. On the morning? [closed]

In the morning of 19 April 2016, Taliban militants attacked a security team. Or On the morning of 19 April 2016, Taliban militants attacked a security team .
2
votes
1answer
51 views

What about adjective “especial” for a person?

I read about the use of especial and special. But I'm not sure if applies the same when describing a person. For instance, do you say: I am an especial person. or I am a special person.
2
votes
1answer
812 views

Is it preferable to generally use nested prepositional phrases or a hyphenated adjectival phrase?

I've recently run into some sticky situations involving how to write out complicated concept descriptions. Take this example: Which metrics are appropriate for evaluating the accuracy of a ...
2
votes
1answer
166 views

Adjective for someone who knows their limits

I am looking for adjectives for describing a person who knows their limits, what they are capable of and what not, knows their weak and strong points. Usage example: When you are going through a new ...
2
votes
2answers
370 views

Use of apostrophe in adjective phrase containing a possessive

I work and write for a tech company that has created many first-in-the-world technologies. In press releases, I often write something like “[Company name] today announced another world’s first with ...
2
votes
4answers
87 views

Why do adjectives such as; ‘proud’, ‘aware’, ‘capable’, and ‘afraid’ collocate with the preposition 'OF'? [closed]

The preposition of is used in all the following: be proud of; be aware of; be afraid of; be fond of; be capable of; be jealous of; be envious of, etc. I know it might sound ridiculous, but I have ...
1
vote
2answers
195 views

Is there any adjective for describing a person who prefers his/her friends to his/her family?

I'm looking for an adjective /idiom /expression /phrase with a negative connotation, for describing someone who spends their time mostly with their friends, and prefer their friends to their own ...
1
vote
1answer
233 views

Adjectives used with intransitive verbs in lieu of adverbs

I certainly wouldn't argue that "I feel good" should be replaced with "I feel well," but I have forgotten what we used to call the adjective in this type of construction. Adjective predicate? ...
1
vote
2answers
536 views

hyphenation of adjective phrases [duplicate]

Should adjectival phrases that are hyphenated when they modify a noun, e.g. a case-sensitive password, be hyphenated when they are predicate adjectives, e.g. The password is case-sensitive?
1
vote
2answers
990 views

Is it “invoice receivables” or “invoices receivable”?

The latter follows the analogy of accounts receivable as a post-positive adjective.
1
vote
1answer
617 views

What does “fresh-off-the-vine technologies” mean?

Time magazine (February 11) carries an article reviewing the fast evolution of drone technology and problems and opportunities involved with President Obama’s “drone campaign”, under the title Drone ...
1
vote
2answers
121 views

“After-midnight” as adjective

A recent CNN report reads: In an after-midnight session the U.S. Senate passed a bill Saturday ... Google returns few results for after-midnight, other than references to a certain horror ...
1
vote
1answer
88 views

as little as 1 day as an adjective object phrase of a preposition

You can get your money back in as little as 1 day! It is a sentence I heard from an advertisement. Sadly, I cannot tell if this is what the advertisement said, for I did not pay much attention to ...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

Why did the author use “muttering” instead of “mutters” in this sentence?

"He wanders away from the group, muttering something about fingers and toes." - The hunger game, Mockingjay. And can you give me the name of this grammar structure? Is it short form of relative ...
1
vote
3answers
69 views

Adjective phrase for a time?

I wrote a sentence that I don't know is correct. The presence of the doctor after the incident matters to every patient. I think "after the incident" is used as an adjectival phrase. But there ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Offroad, off road, or off-road?

My instincts tell me that the following phrase should be "2014 and newer off-road equipment." When I Google it, I see all of the these: offroad, off road, and off-road. Is there a correct one? Or ...
1
vote
1answer
391 views

Hyphenation of a phrasal attributive with an open compound: “A B to C noun”

I'm wondering how to properly hyphenate (or en-dash) the following phrase: fiber optic to BNC converter That is to say, a device that converts "fiber optic" to BNC. If it didn't contain an open ...
1
vote
1answer
706 views

What is the equivalent of a “Good Watch” for an audiobook or record?

We say that a movie is a "good watch" and a book is a "good read". Somehow, to say that an audiobook or an album is a "good listen" doesn't sound right to my ears, but perhaps that's only because I'...
1
vote
1answer
91 views

Game-development-oriented or game development-oriented? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How to connect a word and a phrase with a hyphen? “Hardware-counter-based tools” or “hardware-counter based tools”? As the title states, which is the correct hyphenation of ...
1
vote
0answers
23 views

How would you call this kind of listing?

There are traditional classifieds where a real estate can be characterized this way: 2-bedroom apartment for rent in Leicester with an area of XX sq ft ... but the same can also be displayed ...
1
vote
4answers
127 views

In the context of a grocery store's signage, which is correct - “Everyday” or “Every Day”?

Here is an illustrated example: A grocer may print information pertaining to a low price deal, on the above pictured sign, and attach it to a shelf for customers to see.
0
votes
2answers
357 views

What's a word to describe black humor of the variety that criticizes the injustices of the world?

For example, let's say I see a homeless man and woman eating scraps of food next to a garbage fire to keep warm and I say to my friend, "Must be date night" (with undertones of "This is a sad world"). ...
0
votes
1answer
591 views

What does “the globe over” mean?

I read this sentence in a book review. I can understand the sentence but, I am confused by the globe over. Human history? Global economy? Her evidence for women the globe over consists of thin, ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Proceed vs. Proceed further/ahead- Redundancy

In a training session on Business English, the instructor often said, proceed and proceed further, usually, after a pause by the speakers or whenever he interrupted. Examples: I ...
0
votes
2answers
32 views

What terms should be used to mean the different states of attendance of volunteers in a clinical study?

In a clinical trail with several visits, it is common to see volunteers not attending their visits at some time point for different reasons. I have these different situations, and I would like to know ...
0
votes
2answers
597 views

Complex compound adjective (adverbial phrase + participle)

A relative of mine and I have hit a brick wall in trying to agree on the grammaticality and stylistic suitability of one his sentences: However, it proved incapable of jeopardizing the under-...
0
votes
2answers
60 views
0
votes
1answer
177 views

Can a prepositional phrase starting with “during” work as an adjectival phrase?

A prepositional phrase comprising a preposition and a noun phrase can generally function either as an adjectival phrase or as an adverbial phrase. The book on the table is mine. (The ...
0
votes
2answers
90 views

“Two separate nouns + based” as the attribute?

In scientific writing, it is correct to write something like The filter-based method is good. But what if I have two nouns before -based? Something like The lowpass filter-based method is ...
-1
votes
1answer
92 views

“Drive-up” vs. “Drive-through”

Recently, I've come across these two words: a drive-up machine/restaurant a drive-through restaurant I'm wondering if there's any difference in the meaning. I found that the word drive-...
-1
votes
2answers
81 views

How do I use paired?

In the sentence "they've built roads, ports and stores in our city, but these facts are unpaired to the schooling steep growing levels." I'd like to know two things: Is the usage of "but these ...
-2
votes
2answers
87 views

Have a sexed up weekend ahead! - is this correct [closed]

Have a sexed-up weekend ahead! This is what my friend told me. He wanted to convey that I have a good/crazy/exciting weekend. Does it make sense?