Technical questions about the sound patterns of English.

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0
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1answer
81 views

Can vs that ( /kæn/ vs /ðæt/ )

I’ve finally decided to take a look at my English pronunciation and it is being an awesome new world. I am focused on Received Pronunciation (British Standard) and one question comes to mind for which ...
0
votes
1answer
105 views

Do you pronounce the T ending sound?

As I was taught in school and , the T ending sound of words is unvoiced and should be pronounced with air, but recently I met a friend from the US, those aired T sounds were missing from her speaking, ...
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2answers
603 views

Reform of English writing? [closed]

As is commonly known, English is quite notorious for having a writing system that is far removed from the actual way it is most commonly pronounced. I understand that there are important historical ...
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2answers
95 views

Pronounciation of w at the end of a word - and what does ʊ mean?

I noticed that when I pronounce words like Show or fellow I seem to drop the w and just say Sho or Fello. My countries English is similar to British English. I wonder if that is normal or if maybe I ...
0
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1answer
125 views

Do we append consonants when linking words?

How should in an instant be spoken? [ɪ nə nɪn.stənt] [ɪn nən nɪn.stənt] If we use second version, then we append [n] before [ən] and before [n.stənt]. How do I correctly link words together when ...
0
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1answer
565 views

TH sound, is it continuant or stop?

How do you all pronounce the TH sound when speaking fast? For example, I've learned to pronounce the TH sound like a continuant sound, for example the hard one: ð. I start doing a Z, so this Z go ...
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2answers
96 views

UK English pronunciation of word “language” please?

What is the correct British English pronunciation of the word language please? Throughout my education in New Zealand and South Africa the first g was a soft sound as in bang? Here in Australia, on ...
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1answer
244 views

What is the phonological error pronouncing /θ/ as /s/ called?

How can I explain the error of pronunciation in the sentence I sink I'm going to bed where the word pronounced sink is actually think?
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1answer
163 views

'r' sound before 'th' sound

I'm learning British English. The r is usually dropped, so I never noticed a little thing, most of the time when I use an r before the th sound, my tongue does a kind of a tap or something between r ...
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0answers
82 views

Morphemic versus phonemic approach to teaching the many sounds of “ou”

Is there a way I can explain the many sounds of the phoneme "ou" using the morphemic structure of words instead of the phonemic way?
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0answers
93 views

Did the Great Vowel Shift on the long vowel /i/ occur in non-primary stressed syllables?

From the Wikipedia article on the Great Vowel Shift . Middle English [iː] diphthongized to [ɪi], which was most likely followed by [əɪ] and finally Modern English [aɪ] (as in mice). I think the ...
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0answers
39 views

Why “qu” is pronounced “qw” (as in quit, question) [duplicate]

Or to put it the other way, why qu is not spelled qw, as qwit, qwestion, for quit, question.
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0answers
32 views

English phonetics References [duplicate]

What are some great references on English pronunciation practices? The book The Big Book of Beastly Mispronunciations was mentioned in an answer on this site. Is it considered authoritative? What ...
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2answers
352 views

How are names ending in “-s” perceived?

Most English nouns are inflected for grammatical number by adding -s — e.g., cat and cats, where cats is and sounds plural. So, I wonder, since Lucas, Nicholas, and other English names end with -s, ...
-1
votes
1answer
248 views

What's the term of “omission” in phonetics? [closed]

What's the term of "omission" in phonetics? Omission has a special term.Please help me. Apheresis , hypheresis , and apocope are all kinds of omission or elision , but I want to know the name of ...
-1
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0answers
56 views

The pronunciation rules of words which begin 'Com-, Col-, Cor-' or 'Con-'

What is the standard rule, if there is one, for pronouncing words beginning with the prefixes com-, col-, cor-, con-? Very often these words have an /ɒ/ vowel, like in the word hot - in Gen ...
-3
votes
2answers
942 views

Are there are more vowels in the American English than in British? [closed]

car, father, jarring ■ man, lad, mast A British guy would pronounce the vowel "a" equally in all these words. But an American would give one sound for the first three words, and the other ...
-3
votes
1answer
381 views

Which best describes the English language?

English has complex morphology and less rigid phonology. English has less complex phonology but more rigid morphology. English has both rigid and complex morphology and phonology.