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1
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0answers
217 views

How many “monophthongs” are there in RP? Do all the varieties of spoken English in the UK have the same number?

A monophthong is a pure vowel sound. The monophthongs can be contrasted with diphthongs, where the vowel quality changes within the same syllable, and hiatus, where two vowels are next to each ...
8
votes
3answers
937 views

Which does English “l” and “r” sound come under, an allophone or different phonemes?

I was very much embarrassed when I was pointed out by ELU Senpai that I made a great mistake by misspelling ‘Mod election’ as ‘Mod erection’ during ELU chat. We Japanese often make a silly mistake of ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

American English Pronunciation of “o” sound long or short?

I'm always confused about how to pronounce words with letter o in spelling. For example, in the word boss, I always pronounce the o as short o, when in fact it is long o. Collar is short, but I always ...
1
vote
1answer
230 views

What phoneme symbols does Google show in its search results?

I'm familiar with the IPA characters, but google shows other symbols in its search results. What I want to find is an equivalence table or something to get the IPA characters of any particular word ...
0
votes
0answers
38 views

Is there a rule that dictates the usage of the ending of adjectives as in: symbolical vs. symbolic; economic vs. economical; mythic vs. mythical? [duplicate]

I'm not a native English speaker, but I do have to write in English quite a lot in my work, and I've often come across the use of adjectives that are sometimes added the "al" suffix, as with the ...
7
votes
1answer
1k views

Distinguishing /f–t–θ/ in th-fronting and th-stopping dialects

In standard English, the digraph th is a dental fricative [θ, ð]. Several dialects feature th-fronting, where th becomes a labiodental fricative [f, v]; others feature th-stopping, where th becomes a ...
2
votes
2answers
605 views

What’s the difference between /ӕ/ and /ɑ/?

. . . alibis . . . appetite . . . rather . . . Mark . . . [audio source] The first two a’s are different in their phonetic symbols in the dictionaries from the other two, but I can’t differentiate. ...
4
votes
2answers
249 views

What is the name of the ɔʏ sound?

What's the English name of the oi sound written as "eu" and commonly found in Germanic words like Deutschland, and names like Euler and von Neumann?
11
votes
5answers
1k views

Looking for a minimal triple

I am looking for a minimal triple for a particular set of phonemes. By minimal triple, I mean three actual English words that differ in one and only one phoneme between them. Examples therefore ...
9
votes
1answer
2k views

In IPA, what is the difference between ə and ʌ?

In all the examples I've seen they seem to be the same sound. Examples of ə: a in about a in comma Examples of ʌ: u in run o in won I am trying to decipher the difference between these sounds ...
7
votes
1answer
728 views

How did the “double consonant to shorten vowel” thing come about? (“furry” vs. “fury”)

In English, a doubled consonant most commonly means "shorten the previous vowel", where "shorten" means map phonemes like this: [aɪ] -> [i] [oʊ] -> [ɔ] etc For example, fury is pronounced [fjʊri] ...