Questions related to personal pronoun, an independent pronoun which can have various forms according to gender, number, person, and case.

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1answer
42 views

What's the correct pronoun for “people like us”? [duplicate]

In the sentence "people like us never wash […] hands", should the pronoun be "our" or "their"?
2
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3answers
476 views

Is English the only language that always capitalizes “I”? [duplicate]

Is English the only language where "I" is always capitalized, no matter where it occurs in a sentence? The other two languages that I'm familiar with don't do this. In German, "ich" is only ...
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2answers
25 views

What is the precise word for the person who involves more in anything? [closed]

What is the term used for any person who involves much in any thing.. Like He can do anything to achieve his interest? Not to be understood in the negative tone; May be like, Who gives ...
2
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2answers
122 views

“Thou shalt not pass” and “You shall not pass” hybrid

Is it technically incorrect grammar to make a hybrid of the well known statements: "Thou shalt not pass" and "You shall not pass"––this hybrid being: "You shalt not pass"? From what I understand from ...
0
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1answer
45 views

What's the meaning of “for he/she was…” [closed]

(...) for she was a young woman. What's the exact meaning of "for she" in this context? "For her(self)"? "Because"? Is it formal? How often is it used in colloquial register?
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2answers
48 views

What is the correct pronoun for mixed gender antecedents?

Neither John nor Mary thinks (pronoun?) will lose their race. Probably the best solution for this sentence is to recast it as "Both John and Mary think the other will lose their race," or something ...
2
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3answers
68 views

Should there be a subjective or objective pronoun here?

Reopen note This question has been linked to this question here: "Heard me [infinitive]" vs. "heard me [present participle]" However, that question is clearly about whether to ...
1
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1answer
56 views

Usage of “Me and yours”

I was having a chat to my girlfriend when something came up and I said "Speaking of dads, I had a dream where me and yours were going...". Here "me" refers to myself and "yours" to her dad. She ...
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2answers
88 views

“It might be her brother” vs “He might be her brother”

Why do we use it might be her brother instead of he? For example, Who is that guy with Susan? I'm not sure it might be her brother. Why do we use the third person singular it instead of he might ...
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2answers
77 views

Grammar and what is unspecified

On another thread I used the example: I thought Jones was an idiot, they behaved so strangely And it was pointed out that: You can't use the gender-neutral 'they' in this situation. ...
12
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5answers
373 views

Can a pronoun and its referent have different plurality?

(Hello, everyone. I am new to this community and also not familiar to English, so if this posting does not meet your standard or tradition, please let me know.) My question is as the title says: Is ...
3
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4answers
358 views

Why do we ask “Who is she?” in the subjective form? [closed]

If "her" is objective and "she" is subjective, why do we say: 'Who is she?' instead of: 'Who is her?' apart from the latter sounding a bit strange? For instance: 'That car belongs to ...
3
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3answers
1k views

Is “mes” an accepted plural form of “me”?

Is mes (the first two letters pronounced the same way as me, an alternate spelling is probably me's) an accepted plural form of me? There are other mes in other possible worlds.
2
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1answer
176 views

Who is being referred to in this dialogue from the motion picture “Captain America: The First Avenger?”

There was this scene in the motion picture "Captain America: The First Avenger" where Steve Rogers and Agent Peggy Carter are driving through Brooklyn. The following dialogue ensued: Steve Rogers: ...
0
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1answer
184 views

“such as yourselves” or “such as you”

Would it be Without patrons such as yourselves, we could not have this event. OR Without patrons such as you, we could not have this event.
1
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1answer
147 views

“I, (any name), am here to… ” is this correct?

I'm using this to introduce myself in a speech. The sentence goes like, "On behalf of xyz, I, Kartik Choubisa, am here to..." Or should i say, "... Is here to...?"
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2answers
56 views

Is “we” an imperative? [closed]

Is the english use of "we" an example of an imperative in "We forced our backs...we cursed through sludge" ? I think it sort of is, I'm not so sure.
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0answers
28 views
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2answers
9k views

Can I use “our” and “we” in a formal essay? [closed]

I am writing a formal essay, based on the following prompt Differing points of view make life interesting. I am finding it hard to avoid using "our" and "we" in the essay. For example, in the ...
0
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1answer
43 views

What a pronoun should one use: “you” or “yours”? [duplicate]

This document sets out the rights and responsibilities of [you || yours], the Company, and the concerned third parties. If "the Client's rights" can be rephrased to "the rights of Client", then, ...
11
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4answers
2k views

Is “her” a possessive or an objective pronoun in “A mother takes care of her children”?

I had a sort of debate with my teacher to whether the her in the sentence A mother takes care of her children. is a possessive or an objective pronoun. I told my teacher that it was a possesive ...
-1
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1answer
184 views

Generic he, correct or incorrect? [duplicate]

Completely ignoring the sexist aspect of the word, is using "he" as a gender neutral pronoun grammatically correct or incorrect? I'm well aware that using "he" may come off as sexist or politically ...
7
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5answers
2k views

“We rarely go on holiday.” Can I say “Us neither”?

Since, in the first person singular, I can compare my situation, tastes, etc. to someone else's saying "Neither do I." or "Me neither."… … is it possible to use all the other personal pronouns in the ...
4
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5answers
876 views

The difference between “it” and “he/she”

There seems to be a difference between these two pronouns besides the obvious one of animacy. I want to know if people agree or can point out the flaw in my thinking. I've been attempting to wrangle ...
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1answer
2k views

use of I and me at the beginning of a sentence [duplicate]

Which one is correct: I and my father are going to the market. Me and my father are going to the market.
1
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2answers
348 views

Pronoun usage and conjugation [closed]

Why do we say 'I am a teacher' instead of 'I is a teacher' when 'I' is a singular pronoun?
3
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1answer
1k views

Proper use of I vs me [duplicate]

I stated the following: Angela was reading to Frank and I. Someone corrected me, stating "Frank and me" Which is right?
2
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1answer
271 views

Me, myself, or I?

a) I am surprised that someone other than I had a cat named Hamlet. or b) I am surprised that someone other than myself had a cat named Hamlet. or c) I am surprised that someone ...
1
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1answer
102 views

entailed him / his being - use of pronoun vs possessive determiner [duplicate]

The position entailed him/his being in Chicago most of the time. The bonuses were based on him/his reaching the quota. It had nothing to do with him/his being privy to the information. His ...
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1answer
376 views

“It is me whom she loves” or “It is I whom she loves” which one is grammatically correct? [duplicate]

It is me whom she loves or It is I whom she loves Because I know that "It is I" is grammatically correct.
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2answers
206 views

“I” or “me” in one word question [duplicate]

Which of the two is more correct, when one wants to make sure whether he/she is a subject of the statement (ex. the sentence is addressed at two people, and one of those two people wants to make sure, ...
2
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1answer
324 views

“Whom” or “who” for object of a subordinate clause inside a relative clause [duplicate]

They interviewed several candidates who he thought had the experience and qualifications he required. My test prep book says this should be "who" because of the subordinate clause's predicate: ...
1
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1answer
39 views

“The new guys are dressed a lot nicer than we/us” [duplicate]

Does anyone know the correct word choice between "we" and "us", and explain the reason why? Thanks!
0
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1answer
924 views

When to use “myself” or “me” [duplicate]

Which is grammatically correct? "Request you to register me for the course" "Request you to register myself for the course"
3
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1answer
95 views

'Let's get our socks on'/'Aren't we clever' Pronoun Usage

I sometimes hear people using us, we etc. when talking to young children in order to refer to the child: e.g "Let's get our socks on"; "Aren't we a clever boy". For how long have people done this? Is ...
1
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2answers
487 views

Using pronoun “it” instead of (personal) pronouns “her” or “him”

Can pronoun "it" be used instead of (personal) pronouns "her" or "him" in a disparaging/derogative manner especially in the personal pronouns? I've watched a movie wherein a dead body was found and, ...
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1answer
104 views

What does “themself” mean? [closed]

My English teacher explained about themself and themselves. I don't really quite understand though.
1
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3answers
903 views

Usage of myself vs me [duplicate]

"Please summit your registration forms to John, Jay, or myself before the end of the day." My homework says "myself" is incorrect and "me" should be used in the context of this sentence. I don't ...
0
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0answers
46 views

case: 'my' or 'me'? [duplicate]

Thank you baby for my being able to share this with you or Thank you baby for me being able to share this with you Which is correct?
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2answers
4k views

“I and Jane” or “me and Jane”?

So I know that it's correct to say: Jane and I are going shopping I shouldn't use me here because (as stated on Oxford Dictionaries Online) I is what I would use in the singular form of the ...
1
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0answers
47 views

Third-Person Possessive Pronouns in Dual Possessives [duplicate]

I understand the rules for dual possessives, but I was writing and I realized that I have no idea how the following sentence should be written. She and Kevin's house is big. or Her and Kevin's ...
2
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4answers
132 views

“Looks more genuine than me/I writing”

In the following sentence, which is more appropriate — I or me, and why? Sending separate mails will look more genuine than me/I writing on behalf of everyone.
0
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1answer
134 views

Is there a gender-neutral pronoun? [duplicate]

I've noticed a tendency in recent technical literature to use feminine pronouns, instead of the more traditional masculine. For example one might write she [the user] enters her password. It's not ...
4
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6answers
1k views

What to call a person who doesn't respect personal space? [closed]

What would you call a person that doesn't care for your personal space and is kind-of sticky and doesn't get the hint that people are awkward around him/her and generally avoid him/her?
0
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1answer
166 views

Given “a player” as antecedent, when should the pronoun be “he” or “she”? [duplicate]

I am learning game theory. I always see that professors write (in text books): a player chooses her strategy If she chooses a strategy Also some professors use he instead of she. There other ...
2
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3answers
328 views

Is “Hers was a good point” grammatical?

Would it be grammatical to say: Hers was also a good point to include a header specifying the contact person. as opposed to: It was also a good point she made to include a header specifying ...
0
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1answer
248 views

Term for the use of “you” to refer to “the hypothetical person in question”

My wife was discussing pudding consistency this morning and used a sentence along the lines of, "I only like the pudding you make". I blinked and asked if she really liked the pudding I make and she ...
1
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2answers
114 views

The English usage of the subject pronoun “We”

Can "We" be used as an indefinite pronoun such as "Everybody" or "One" to refer to people in general. Example: One cannot make an omelette without breaking eggs. It is a (French) proverb originally ...
2
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3answers
790 views

“Older version of me” vs. “older version of myself”

I wrote: "...," said an older version of me. But a native speaker of English — which I am not — replaced the me with myself. Can someone tell me which one is correct and why?
8
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1answer
946 views

Does “In the event of …” take the genitive case?

Is insisting on a genitive pronoun after "In the event of ..." pedantry or correct? For example: "In the event of ..." his/him winning the election my/me dying our/us leaving For those who ...