Questions about past participle forms of verbs.

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50
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6answers
5k views

What we've gelost — why doesn't English use the prefix “ge-”?

The Germanic languages that I'm familiar with all use a prefix similar to ge- on past participles: German: Ich habe mir den Fuß gebrochen. Dutch: Ik heb mijn voet gebroken. But English ...
30
votes
2answers
2k views

Why are clothes “hung” but men “hanged”?

It is said that clothes can be hung but men are hanged. Is this correct, and if so, why?
21
votes
3answers
82k views

“Inputted” or “input”

I have used the word inputted in an assignment and am being forced to change it to input. However, both the Oxford English Dictionary (I am in New Zealand so this is most relevant) and MS Word list ...
18
votes
4answers
52k views

“Spelt” vs. “spelled”

In the following sentence, should I say spelled or spelt: You spelt/spelled "Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis" wrong.
17
votes
4answers
8k views

“Focussed” or “focused”? The double consonant

Initially, my question was: is "focussed" or "focused" the correct past tense of "focus", but since this applies to a lot of words, I would like to generalize and ask: is there supposed to be a rule ...
15
votes
4answers
1k views

Are the verbs that are conjugated to end in “-n” in the past related?

There are many words that in English are conjugated in the past tense to end in "-n": grow goes to grown, sew goes to sewn, throw goes to thrown, etc.. I'm guessing it was probably the regular ...
15
votes
2answers
69k views

Is it “quit” or “quitted”?

What is the correct (grammatical) simple past and past participle form of the verb quit? Is it quit or quitted? She quitted her job. (She has quitted her job.) or She quit her job. (She has ...
14
votes
3answers
25k views

Is “misconfigured” a word?

I use the word "misconfigured" all the time, but MS Word, Chrome, and the two dictionaries I checked don't list it as a word. I'm going to keep using it instead of "configured incorrectly" because I ...
13
votes
2answers
12k views

Why is the phrase “should have went” so widely used?

Rarely do we hear "should have gone" in common speech. Some background: My father immigrated to the US in the late 60s. He learned English first overseas, British English. Then he studied extensively ...
12
votes
5answers
39k views

“To be subject to” vs. “to be subjected to”

I read an article from Toronto Star today which stated: TTC workers are subject to alcohol and drug testing. A later paragraph of the same article repeated it, except it used subjected to ...
12
votes
4answers
2k views

Word for “left alone and to die”?

Is there a word that means "left alone and to die"? Edit: I believe there is such a word. I think I'm looking for abandoned and alone. Others expectations are that you'll die.
12
votes
7answers
10k views

What does the term “86'd” relate to?

What does it mean when someone or something is referred to as being "86'd"?
11
votes
6answers
3k views

“Don't got” — how common is it in American usage?

I often hear the usage "don't got" in American English as spoken on TV programmes. Recently I was watching season four of "Prison Break" and one character, an Asian computer wizard, repeatedly used ...
11
votes
4answers
3k views

Why is “to get” sometimes used where “to be” could be used?

Why is "to get" sometimes used where "to be" could be used? Examples: "The video got uploaded to the web site." vs. "The video was uploaded to the web site." "He got thrown in the pool." vs. "He ...
10
votes
5answers
3k views

Past participle used as a noun?

Some examples include: We fear the damned. He honored our fallen. This is a given. You are the chosen. The lost were among us. They obey the venerated. My beloved kissed me. (TIL ...
10
votes
4answers
389 views

Past passive tense for smite without connoting infatuation, or an alternative

TL;DR: What is the past tense of smite in the passive voice? Is there an alternative word or series of words with the intended nuance? I am trying to find an alternative to the past passive tense for ...
10
votes
1answer
9k views

“Overrode” vs “Overridden”

I got into an argument about the sentence "Have you overrode SomeThingamajig?" I thought that "have overrode" is incorrect, and should be "overrode" or "have overridden", or perhaps "did override". ...
10
votes
1answer
6k views

“Broadcast” or “broadcasted”

I'm not a native English speaker, so sorry if this is a very basic question. Is broadcast a verb? If it is, what is the simple past and past participle: broadcasted?
9
votes
5answers
35k views

How to use “text” as a verb

–verb (used without object) Digital Technology. 15. to send a text message: Texting while driving is an accident asking to happen. Can I use: I text to her but she didn't text me back. ...
9
votes
3answers
61k views

“Show,” “shown,” and “showed”

I need advice on the best use of the verb show. When do you use showed? I find myself substituting has shown, even when I meant to use the preterit in my sentence. I prefer "she has shown" over "she ...
9
votes
4answers
2k views

Is this correct grammar: “[…] cash can't be beat.”

I found the following phrase in a NYTimes article and I was pretty surprised that it wasn't corrected or edited out: "But when it comes to privacy and freedom, cash can't be beat.". I am under the ...
9
votes
4answers
20k views

Would you use the word “swum” these days?

Would you use the word "swum" these days? I mean, grammatically, it is the past participle of the verb "to swim", but it seems to me that no one uses it anymore. If it's the case, how would You ...
8
votes
7answers
3k views

Using -ed vs. -ing in the “needs washed” construction

I'm from Central Pennsylvania, and apparently, we have a strange language construct in this area. I was recently talking about how "my car needs washed" to a friend from NJ, and she told me that my ...
8
votes
2answers
869 views

Obama's use of “bemused”

I generally see the definition of "bemused" to be synonymous with "confused" or "puzzled", and that it is wrong to use it as a synonym of "amused". However I tend to see it used — as Obama did ...
7
votes
1answer
1k views

Why is “transferred” written with two R's?

Why is transferred written with two R's? I am a native speaker of Dutch, and in my point of view this isn't logical; there are other words like coloured and endeavoured that only have -ed added after ...
7
votes
4answers
14k views

Which is more correct: “burgled” or “burglarized”?

Which is more correct: We were burgled yesterday. or We were burglarized yesterday. I'm from the U.K. and never use burglarized but my friend from the U.S.A. seems to think it's OK.
7
votes
3answers
1k views

Is “dispreferred” a mainstream word in English?

I just recently came across the word dispreferred in a linguistic document. I have never heard the word used before, rather I generally hear something like "preferred something else" in everyday ...
6
votes
3answers
3k views

What is more appropriate — “hanged” or “hung”?

Say that you are using some software, and it hangs. In this case, what should I say: ... when we execute this command, software X gets hanged [or simply hangs]. ... when we execute this ...
6
votes
3answers
258 views

Better term to put on a label of a bottle of milk to describe that it's 'made' in a particular geographic location

While waiting for the kettle to boil this morning, I was idling and reading the label on the bottle of milk and was struck by the declaration: "Permeate free, made in WA". Here's a shot of the label ...
6
votes
3answers
968 views

How widely-accepted is “What do you got?” to Americans?

Watching A Stranger Among Us, I noticed that Melanie Griffith twice asked "What do you got?" I recognise this as an American construction which sounds strange to me — Brits invariably say either ...
6
votes
2answers
5k views

“Favored” vs. “favorited”

We're making a website in which users can mark some objects as objects they like. Since we're not native English speakers here, a dispute evolved around what's the correct way to call this user-object ...
6
votes
1answer
469 views

Pronunciation of “-ed” endings

I noticed that the final -ed has different pronunciations. What's the general rule for knowing the correct pronunciation?
5
votes
2answers
146 views

How is “stripping such words as remained of orthodox meanings” meant to be understood grammatically?

I was wondering if someone could help me out with a certain phrase I want to grasp the meaning of. I have two different meanings in my mind, and I was hoping that someone could point out the right ...
5
votes
4answers
554 views

“Passed” vs “past”: Usage in an error message

I wrote code to detect a problem where live video playout of a file had moved beyond the end of the clip on disk. The clip itself may be growing due to an ongoing recording or a transfer of the file ...
5
votes
5answers
834 views

Does a laser “etch” things, or does it “engrave” them?

Which (if any) of these adjectives would you use for describing a surface that has been cut using a laser beam: a laser-etched surface a laser-engraved surface a laser-(something else) surface a ...
5
votes
1answer
9k views

“Awoken” vs. “awaked”

I understand that the verb awake has two different past participle forms, awoken and awaked. Checking Google Ngram I saw that the former has become more popular than the latter in the last century. I ...
5
votes
3answers
596 views

Is using past participle instead of present one more polite?

On christianity.stackexchange.com I asked this question: "Is it true that John Paul the Second restored the practice of selling indulgences in 2000?" and one supporter suggested that I replace ...
4
votes
6answers
431 views

A word for the job a cashier does for each customer

A cashier in a grocery store has __ 80 customers today. Expedited? Served? Handled? I have a feeling there's a better word.
4
votes
2answers
516 views

Is “proven” very old -fashioned?

I occasionally see the participle "proven" in mathematical texts, instead of "proved". Of course I realize that this a deliberate archaism, but I wanted to know if this is still used in books or ...
4
votes
2answers
21k views

What's the difference between “dissatisfied” and “unsatisfied”?

Is there a clear-cut difference between dissatisfied and unsatisfied?
4
votes
6answers
16k views

Proper usage of the word 'thunk'

What is the proper usage of the word thunk? According to Merriam-Webster, it is dialect past and past participle of think Can it be used in a formal context? Is "Who would have thunk?" different ...
4
votes
2answers
11k views

“Forgotten” or “forgot” as past participle of “forget”

In US and in UK respectively, which is more popular as the past participle of forget: forgotten or forgot? Which is more formal/informal? Examples: I haven't forgot(ten) you. You will not ...
4
votes
1answer
912 views

“Experimentally determined” vs. “determined experimentally”

Which of the following sentences is correct? The numbers are experimentally determined. The numbers are determined experimentally. Are both (not) correct and if only one of them is ...
4
votes
3answers
676 views

What's going on in “I have been to the store many times”?

I thought been was the past participle of to be, but it seems to behave like the past participle of to go in this case: I go to the store every Wednesday. I have been/gone to the store many ...
4
votes
6answers
95k views

“Belated happy birthday” or “happy belated birthday”?

What's the correct sentence? Belated happy birthday! Happy belated birthday!
4
votes
1answer
380 views

The original usage of past participles

I have heard that the origin of the present perfect construction is that sentences like "I have it done" (passive) changed to "I have done it" (present perfect). Is that true at all? If that's the ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Generalised rule for verb usage in simple present tense using participle

I'm doing a school exercise where I have to give an explanation of the underlined (or in this case bold) verb usage in given sentences, following this format: I was waiting. past continuous ...
3
votes
7answers
12k views

“Situated” vs. “located”

I found the following example in my vocabulary: The town is situated on a plateau high up among the mountains of the north. Can I replace situated with located for the example above? What's the ...
3
votes
5answers
30k views

Should I use “got” or “gotten” in the following sentence?

I can't figure out whether to use got or gotten in the following sentence: I no longer recognized my own skin, my own feelings, my own thoughts. It was as if the real me had got/gotten lost on ...
3
votes
2answers
608 views

“Perverse interest” vs. “perverted interest”

Does anybody recognize differences between the following sentences? She took a perverse interest in photos of boys. She took a perverted interest in photos of boys.