Questions about past participle forms of verbs.

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1answer
56 views

Is 'gotten' a proper/legitimate word?

According to what I was taught as school, the past tense of 'get' is 'got' and 'gotten' is "an American corruption and, therefore, is not a proper word". Example: "Should auld acquaintance be ...
5
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2answers
302 views

British English spelling: “gripped” or “gript”?

Hello what is the correct British English spelling of the word 'gripped' or 'gript'? According to Dictionary.com: gript verb 1. a past participle and simple past tense of grip. verb ...
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2answers
75 views

Using “done” instead of “did”

How does it work the use of the past participle done instead of the past tense did? Where is this form used? Only in southern U.S.? How often?
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0answers
60 views

Earth and Moon as seen from Mars [migrated]

As seen from mars why are we using the ''seen'' form in this sentence ? what is the grammatical aspect of this ? all i know is: when we use past participle, we always need to use have or has.
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1answer
77 views

What is the difference between “broke” and “was broken”?

What is the difference between "broke" and "be broken" in the following? The pot broke as I kicked it. The pot was broken as I kicked it.
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2answers
260 views

Do I so often encounter simple past for past participle (e.g., “I have went,” “what was did to her”) because of where I am or when?

Since moving to small-town northern Minnesota (USA) two dozen years back to teach English, I have noticed a lot of instances in spoken language where the simple past is used in lieu of the past ...
5
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3answers
931 views

Is it possible to use had to + past participle?

I always think that the proper use of this construction is, for example: 'After the death of her grandfather, she had to take over his duties on the farm'. This is a sentence from my paper, which ...
4
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3answers
3k views

Use didn't leave yet, or haven't left yet? Can we use ''YET'' in past tense or not? [closed]

My knowledge of English grammar is very basic. I learned English mostly from movies and a lot of times I choose a specific way to say something in English based on intuition or the feeling that it ...
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1answer
71 views

It is about Gerunds and present participle [duplicate]

Please clarify if what I have mentioned below is correct. I like painting. - Gerund? I like painting pictures. - Present participle?
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2answers
106 views

Is the phrase “English Spoken Classes” correct?

I saw an advert for "English Spoken Classes". While reading it, I thought that it was incorrect and should instead read "English Speaking Classes". A quick search on Google returned results for ...
0
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2answers
46 views

being mocked vs mocked after a noun [closed]

In the sentence: To please others, people being mocked or teased may suppress their actual feelings which can result in stress to him. what if I change it to To please others, people mocked or ...
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0answers
30 views

The past tense of 'input' [duplicate]

What is the past tense of the word 'input'? It doesn't sound right to me in this sentence but I am not really sure what should be used. They inputted the password in the database yesterday. What ...
2
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1answer
29 views

“camping” vs. “camped” under a bridge [closed]

If you were to describe a group of poor illegal immigrants who live in tents under a bridge, would you say that they are "camping" under a bridge, or that they are "camped" under a bridge? If I write ...
5
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3answers
18k views

“Forgotten” or “forgot” as past participle of “forget”

In US and in UK respectively, which is more popular as the past participle of forget: forgotten or forgot? Which is more formal/informal? Examples: I haven't forgot(ten) you. You will not ...
0
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3answers
83 views

Why does “written” become the past participle in this sentence?

Consider the following sentence: Harry Potter is the best book ever written. The word "written" is the past participle, but why? I believe it's the passive voice, but I have a friend who ...
2
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2answers
120 views

Past Participle as Adverb

I just read the following sentence from a German native speaker: We have to do this coordinated. I am also German native speaker, so this sentence sounds like a straight translation of Wir ...
1
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2answers
52 views

VP-deletion in a sentence

What part of a verb phrase is omitted in the following sentence? Nearly a million people lived there, making do, as they always had [VP deletion], with candles, torches and lanterns. At ...
6
votes
2answers
8k views

“Favored” vs. “favorited”

We're making a website in which users can mark some objects as objects they like. Since we're not native English speakers here, a dispute evolved around what's the correct way to call this user-object ...
12
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1answer
10k views

“Broadcast” or “broadcasted”

I'm not a native English speaker, so sorry if this is a very basic question. Is broadcast a verb? If it is, what is the simple past and past participle: broadcasted?
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2answers
2k views

Present perfect tense with the verb 'is'

I would like to know how to use the verb to be and its past participle. For example: The rain is gone. Is is present perfect tense here?
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6answers
68k views

“Spelt” vs. “spelled”

In the following sentence, should I say spelled or spelt: You spelt/spelled "Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis" wrong.
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votes
3answers
1k views

Obama's use of “bemused”

I generally see the definition of "bemused" to be synonymous with "confused" or "puzzled", and that it is wrong to use it as a synonym of "amused". However I tend to see it used — as Obama did ...
14
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5answers
62k views

“To be subject to” vs. “to be subjected to”

I read an article from Toronto Star today which stated: TTC workers are subject to alcohol and drug testing. A later paragraph of the same article repeated it, except it used subjected to ...
8
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1answer
2k views

Why is “transferred” written with two R's?

Why is transferred written with two R's? I am a native speaker of Dutch, and in my point of view this isn't logical; there are other words like coloured and endeavoured that only have -ed added after ...
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4answers
20k views

“Focussed” or “focused”? The double consonant

Initially, my question was: is "focussed" or "focused" the correct past tense of "focus", but since this applies to a lot of words, I would like to generalize and ask: is there supposed to be a rule ...
5
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1answer
13k views

“Awoken” vs. “awaked”

I understand that the verb awake has two different past participle forms, awoken and awaked. Checking Google Ngram I saw that the former has become more popular than the latter in the last century. I ...
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1answer
383 views

“should + have + p.p.” meaning

We can use the following structure Should + have + p.p. with two different meanings. Can someone explain those meanings for me?
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3answers
71 views

“All opened files” or “all open files”?

I am not sure when I am supposed to use "open" vs "opened". Isn't "opened" the past participle form? Therefore should I talk about "the opened file"? I feel "the open file" sounds more right...
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2answers
57 views

Hyphenation of a multiple adverb-past participle phrase

I am editing a research article, and I came across a phrase that I am having some trouble hyphenating: "the detoxification of both endogenous and exogenous derived acetaldehyde." My thought is that ...
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2answers
118 views

What is the tense used in a phrase such as “He is trapped”?

I've read that the -ed suffix usually indicates a "past participle" (as in "I was trapped"), but: I'm not sure what part-of-speech "trapped" functions as in the phrase. Indicating present state ...
-2
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1answer
77 views

Is 'walked' the correct tense in this paragraph? [closed]

The next folder she opened contained something that neither of them had expected: five photos of Emily’s brother. They had been taken while James walked through a glass door.
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1answer
10k views

When to use 'had been' + past participle of the verb

I read the sentence below in a news article: "The couple had been engaged since the summer," her spokeswoman said in a statement. Why was "had been engaged" used in this sentence. Is it wrong to ...
0
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1answer
50 views

a better term for “Energy Imbalance Market”

These are how I understand the meaning of the phrases Energy imbalanced market: Trading of energy in a market where supply of energy is imbalanced. Energy imbalance market: Trading of ...
5
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1answer
382 views

Origin of irregular ending “-ught” for past simple and participle

There is a little group of irregular verbs in English that follow a similar pattern, having "-ught" as their ending for past simple and for participle. These verbs are among the group of most used ...
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8answers
5k views

Past participle after noun: “proposed cost” vs. “cost proposed”

I have the following two examples: Our proposed cost is expensive. Our cost proposed is expensive. Is there any difference between them? Or is the second sentence wrong?
0
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1answer
80 views

Participle clauses with past participles

I have read many times that "participle clauses with past participles have a passive meaning" but I came across this sentence which made me confused.Is this sentence grammatically correct? ...
0
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0answers
24 views

What is the rule and the exception for doubling consonants in the past participle? [duplicate]

The general rule when constructing the past participle for multisyllable verbs is that the last consonant is doubled if the last syllable is stressed: admit -> admitted program -> programmed ...
2
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1answer
34k views

'Seen as' or 'seeing as'

Look at these examples: You should clean the milk seen as you spilt it. You should clean the milk seeing as you spilt it. Which one is correct, and how is it grammatically defined/termed?
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1answer
69 views

Temporal Clause for Past Participle

I was wondering if there is a difference between reduced temporal clause with gerund and reduced temporal clause with past participle, and which one is used in formal setting? For example: Sentence ...
3
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3answers
9k views

Opened vs open?

Is there are rule when to use opened vs open? I always get confused even though I've been speaking English as the dominant language for more than half my life. E.g. Is the door open(ed)? ...
0
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3answers
4k views

Another way of saying “being judged”

What is another way of saying "being judged?" The context is: Being judged gave me an open mind about the different ways other cultures are judged and treated as well. Being criticized ...
14
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4answers
2k views

What is the past tense form of s--t [closed]

Are shit, shat, and shitted all correct and fine to use as the past tense of shit? After a little bit of searching it seems that they are, with shat being Old English. Is any form more common in ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Struck vs Stricken

Is struck or stricken correct in these sentences? The house was stricken / struck by lightning. The house had been stricken / struck by lightning. He was stricken / struck by grief, cancer, etc. ...
1
vote
1answer
95 views

Infinitive vs. “ing” + past particle [duplicate]

Among the earliest telescopes were Galilean telescopes, modeled after the simple instruments built by Galileo, the first person having used telescopes to study the stars and planets. I know ...
0
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1answer
90 views

What does “spurned” modify in “I am walking out of a room to the jeers of a woman spurned”

I am walking out of a room to the jeers of a woman spurned. Which word does the past participle modify in this context? Does it mean that I was spurned while walking out of the room, or am I out ...
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3answers
118 views

“She had lost her consciousness last night at pub after having several cocktails”. Is this sentence grammatical?

She had lost her consciousness last night at the pub after having several cocktails. Is the use of had (the past perfect tense) right here?
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2answers
172 views

Ellipsis in “can and have occurred”

The side effects can and have occurred. The omitted verb is an infinitive (occur) but the written verb is a past participle (occurred). Is this sentence grammatically correct and suitable for ...
0
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2answers
116 views

Correct usage of the verb “tense”

Are you tense? I read this question in a book and was debating if it was a correct usage of the verb 'tense'. I believe the correct usage should be Are you tensed? Am I right about this?
10
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4answers
497 views

Past passive tense for smite without connoting infatuation, or an alternative

TL;DR: What is the past tense of smite in the passive voice? Is there an alternative word or series of words with the intended nuance? I am trying to find an alternative to the past passive tense for ...
8
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2answers
59k views