Questions about past participle forms of verbs.

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2answers
34 views

Correct usage of the verb “tense”

Are you tense? I read this question in a book and was debating if it was a correct usage of the verb 'tense'. I believe the correct usage should be Are you tensed? Am I right about this?
4
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2answers
11k views

“Forgotten” or “forgot” as past participle of “forget”

In US and in UK respectively, which is more popular as the past participle of forget: forgotten or forgot? Which is more formal/informal? Examples: I haven't forgot(ten) you. You will not ...
0
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2answers
58 views

“She had lost her consciousness last night at pub after having several cocktails”. Is this sentence grammatical?

She had lost her consciousness last night at the pub after having several cocktails. Is the use of had (the past perfect tense) right here?
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2answers
110 views

Ellipsis in “can and have occurred”

The side effects can and have occurred. The omitted verb is an infinitive (occur) but the written verb is a past participle (occurred). Is this sentence grammatically correct and suitable for ...
10
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4answers
389 views

Past passive tense for smite without connoting infatuation, or an alternative

TL;DR: What is the past tense of smite in the passive voice? Is there an alternative word or series of words with the intended nuance? I am trying to find an alternative to the past passive tense for ...
4
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2answers
21k views
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3answers
3k views

Opened vs open?

Is there are rule when to use opened vs open? I always get confused even though I've been speaking English as the dominant language for more than half my life. E.g. Is the door open(ed)? ...
0
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3answers
17k views

“As evidenced by” or “as evident by”?

I have this sentence: Group theory is one of my favourite areas in mathematics, as evidenced by the fact that I chose to do two group theory modules in my undergraduate course. I am wondering if ...
4
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6answers
16k views

Proper usage of the word 'thunk'

What is the proper usage of the word thunk? According to Merriam-Webster, it is dialect past and past participle of think Can it be used in a formal context? Is "Who would have thunk?" different ...
2
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1answer
59 views

Correct usage of past participle?

I'm not a native English speaker, and yesterday I entered a [short] debate with a French guy (again, not native English speaker) who insisted that "the task was scheduled" is not valid from a ...
1
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2answers
139 views

Why “broke” and not “broken” in “If it ain't broke, don't fix it”?

If it ain't broke, don't fix it an idiom says. Why isn't it If it ain't broken, don't fix it On the other hand the lyrics of a song "Victory" played by a band "Deliverance" are as follows: ...
0
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1answer
52 views

A question regarding a parallel

I came across a very neat parallel, but I wonder if I can use the structure today without setting off alarm in an editor's head. A stretch of a series is any piece taken out of it, and not having ...
0
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1answer
68 views

Past tense usage in a formal email [duplicate]

During the period between January and today, I have added many changes to my resume that i want to make an employer noticed of. I doubt between 'have done' and 'had done'. " I would like to inform ...
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6answers
5k views

What we've gelost — why doesn't English use the prefix “ge-”?

The Germanic languages that I'm familiar with all use a prefix similar to ge- on past participles: German: Ich habe mir den Fuß gebrochen. Dutch: Ik heb mijn voet gebroken. But English ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

Is “dispreferred” a mainstream word in English?

I just recently came across the word dispreferred in a linguistic document. I have never heard the word used before, rather I generally hear something like "preferred something else" in everyday ...
4
votes
2answers
516 views

Is “proven” very old -fashioned?

I occasionally see the participle "proven" in mathematical texts, instead of "proved". Of course I realize that this a deliberate archaism, but I wanted to know if this is still used in books or ...
0
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2answers
74 views

Using “heretofore” in the past perfect

Is it grammatically correct to use "heretofore" in the past perfect? ...the king's power, which had heretofore been absolute. The meaning of "heretofore" is "before now", but would it still work ...
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3answers
2k views

What's the difference between an adjective and a past participle? [closed]

I'm really confused about the object the doctor specialized will help you or the documents required How can I tell in the future, if I have to use the past participle or the adjective? And ...
0
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0answers
11 views

How reliable is to be + past participle to identify passive voice? [duplicate]

I am trying to write a software that can identify simple variants of passive voice in an english sentence. I found multiple resources that state that to be + a past participle is an indication that ...
3
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3answers
5k views

“Disbalanced” vs. “unbalanced”

What are the differences in usage between disbalanced and unbalanced?
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0answers
15 views

Grammar used in have been and had been in sentence [duplicate]

When we are going to use have been and had been ? Especially in Past tense and Past participle ?
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3answers
73 views

is “imperative” correct here

I am writing a piece of software related to meetings. Participants are invited to a meeting using a button which the command "invite" is written to be pressed by the person who wished to do the ...
0
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2answers
77 views

Which is more correct: “skewen” or “skewn”?

Which spelling for the past participle of skew is more correct: skewen or skewn? (I recognise it is not the more common spelling of skewed, but regionally and personally skewen is more in use in ...
2
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4answers
809 views

“Worried person” vs. “concerned person”

According to H. Stephens, "There is a great difference between worry and concern. A worried person sees a problem, and a concerned person solves a problem". But ODE seems to be disagreeing with him: ...
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7answers
4k views

Past participle after noun: “proposed cost” vs. “cost proposed”

I have the following two examples: Our proposed cost is expensive. Our cost proposed is expensive. Is there any difference between them? Or is the second sentence wrong?
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7answers
10k views

What does the term “86'd” relate to?

What does it mean when someone or something is referred to as being "86'd"?
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2answers
8k views

What is the past participle of the verb open?

I'm French and I'd like to be precise on the conjugation of the verb "open". On this picture, I'd write "opened" instead of "open". Could you tell me more about why they have written "open"?
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1answer
97 views

When to use under and over as prefixes rather than adverbs with past participles

Is there a rule on when under and over are used as prefixes rather than adverbs when attached to past participles (and whether or not they are hyphenated)? In general, it seems that both words are ...
0
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1answer
146 views

Is it correct to say “I was sure after a year I would get over it”?

My pet dog died last summer, she was the only one I had, but I was sure after a year I would get over it. Or should I say I had get over it there instead?
0
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1answer
92 views

Using past participle vs existent noun form for adjective

There are multiple ways a noun can be described by an adjective by a word that is already an adjective (e.g., big, dark, high, low) by a noun (mushroom house) by a participle (running dogs, painted ...
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0answers
119 views

Do I so often encounter simple past for past participle (e.g., “I have went,” “what was did to her”) because of where I am or when?

Since moving to small-town northern Minnesota (USA) two dozen years back to teach English, I have noticed a lot of instances in spoken language where the simple past is used in lieu of the past ...
4
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6answers
95k views
5
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5answers
836 views

Does a laser “etch” things, or does it “engrave” them?

Which (if any) of these adjectives would you use for describing a surface that has been cut using a laser beam: a laser-etched surface a laser-engraved surface a laser-(something else) surface a ...
3
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5answers
30k views

Should I use “got” or “gotten” in the following sentence?

I can't figure out whether to use got or gotten in the following sentence: I no longer recognized my own skin, my own feelings, my own thoughts. It was as if the real me had got/gotten lost on ...
3
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1answer
918 views

Use of “very” to modify verb participles used as adjectives - correct or not and why?

I have seen several obituaries with this kind of wording: "He is very missed." It looks and sounds wrong, perhaps because "very" can modify adjectives ("He is very tall") and adverbs ("He walks very ...
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1answer
7k views

When to use 'had been' + past participle of the verb

I read the sentence below in a news article: "The couple had been engaged since the summer," her spokeswoman said in a statement. Why was "had been engaged" used in this sentence. Is it wrong to ...
3
votes
1answer
97 views

“I had my house [be] burned down”

I have found out that using the verb be in passive constructions such as: I had my house be burned down is incorrect, therefore it should be I had my house burned down. But is it ...
0
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2answers
3k views

“More drunk” or “drunker”?

I am at a party. I drink wine till I'm drunk. Then I drink some more. So am I more drunk now, or drunker?
3
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1answer
47 views

What's the grammar of “with such transitions governed”?

It's not uncommon to use with to introduce a clause like this: A particle's energy state jumps about randomly, with such transitions governed by the temperature of the system. What's the grammar ...
0
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2answers
207 views

Am I allowed to start a sentence with “Composed”?

Composed of an assortment of ten libraries including inhibitor library, stem cell signaling compound library, and anti-cancer compound library, among others, our bioactive screening libraries ...
17
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4answers
8k views

“Focussed” or “focused”? The double consonant

Initially, my question was: is "focussed" or "focused" the correct past tense of "focus", but since this applies to a lot of words, I would like to generalize and ask: is there supposed to be a rule ...
0
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2answers
192 views

“It was a brilliant performance delivered in silence worthy of her name” — is this word order acceptable?

It was a brilliant performance worthy of her name. There's no problem here, but what if you then add this: It was a brilliant performance delivered in silence worthy of her name. What's ...
21
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3answers
82k views

“Inputted” or “input”

I have used the word inputted in an assignment and am being forced to change it to input. However, both the Oxford English Dictionary (I am in New Zealand so this is most relevant) and MS Word list ...
0
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1answer
517 views

what's the difference between “past tense” and “past participle”? [closed]

For example,in this sentence: Begun in 1078, the Tower of London was built in London’s southeast corner by William the Conqueror. Why does that sentence use begun not began?
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2answers
6k views

“having worked” vs “having been working” difference

I would like to have someone explain the difference here: Having worked there for a year. Having been working there for a year.
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1answer
211 views

Past tense vs past participle in passive forms [closed]

For example: The car is driven by my a friend of mine. vs The car is drove by a friend of mine. Which one is correct?
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0answers
412 views

To Be + ed (or PP) [closed]

Please please please help me figure this out. Why is it okay to use "to be" + past participle sometimes but not always. eg. "It is okay to be excited" or "Knives are to be allowed on planes" or "It is ...
9
votes
4answers
20k views

Would you use the word “swum” these days?

Would you use the word "swum" these days? I mean, grammatically, it is the past participle of the verb "to swim", but it seems to me that no one uses it anymore. If it's the case, how would You ...
0
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6answers
330 views

What is a gentler word than “suspended” or “closed”?

What word can show that an action is redeemable? Is there a synonym for closed/suspended that connotes a chance at redemption?
10
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5answers
3k views

Past participle used as a noun?

Some examples include: We fear the damned. He honored our fallen. This is a given. You are the chosen. The lost were among us. They obey the venerated. My beloved kissed me. (TIL ...