0
votes
1answer
979 views

“Is missing” vs. “is missed” [closed]

I was wondering why we say "something is missing" instead of "something is missed"? If missed is an adjective then why we use it that way? E.g.: "The sword is missing".
-1
votes
1answer
96 views

Motivated or Motivating

Which answer is correct? The renovation project has been led by a highly _____ group of designers. A) motivated B) motivating If not B, why not?
3
votes
3answers
412 views

Administrating vs Admining

I get the sense that the word "Admining", like the word "Admin" from which it derives, is used to refer to computer administration, while "Administrating", like "Administrator", is used more when it ...
0
votes
1answer
208 views

“All that is needing” vs. “all that is needed”

I've read the following quote from Game of Thrones: Opening your eyes is all that is needing. The heart lies and the head plays tricks with us, but the eyes see true. English is not my mother ...
5
votes
3answers
540 views

Is using past participle instead of present one more polite?

On christianity.stackexchange.com I asked this question: "Is it true that John Paul the Second restored the practice of selling indulgences in 2000?" and one supporter suggested that I replace ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Present participle vs. past participle

How to distinguish the difference between the two of them? For example, in the following sentence: Local times, originating from X and perpetuated by Y, have been abolished. Why can I not use ...
0
votes
1answer
236 views

Is this past participle to be changed to present participle?

In this sentence, is the past participle of ‘clasped’ in ‘with his hands clasped over his fat bottom’ to be changed to ‘clasping’? He brought the umbrella swishing down through the air to point at ...
2
votes
1answer
23k views

'Seen as' or 'seeing as'

Look at these examples: You should clean the milk seen as you spilt it. You should clean the milk seeing as you spilt it. Which one is correct, and how is it grammatically defined/termed?
2
votes
5answers
2k views

What is the grammatical difference behind “is interesting” and “is interested”?

I am a native English speaker, yet I cannot explain to a non-native speaker why I say: I am interested in history. as well as History is interesting to me. Why is it "is interesting" when ...
3
votes
3answers
589 views

Why are the present and the past participles of “submit” spelled with double t?

Why are the present and the past participles of submit spelled with two t's?