0
votes
0answers
15 views

Grammar used in have been and had been in sentence [duplicate]

When we are going to use have been and had been ? Especially in Past tense and Past participle ?
3
votes
1answer
43 views

What's the grammar of “with such transitions governed”?

It's not uncommon to use with to introduce a clause like this: A particle's energy state jumps about randomly, with such transitions governed by the temperature of the system. What's the grammar ...
1
vote
0answers
266 views

To Be + ed (or PP) [closed]

Please please please help me figure this out. Why is it okay to use "to be" + past participle sometimes but not always. eg. "It is okay to be excited" or "Knives are to be allowed on planes" or "It is ...
2
votes
2answers
409 views

Should I use a hyphen after -ly when modifying a verb in the past participle verb?

Which of these are acceptable? Is one preferable over the other? "Chemically-deposited tourmaline is never periwinkle." "Chemically deposited tourmaline is never periwinkle." Also, is the title to ...
1
vote
2answers
201 views

Dropping the 'have' before a past participle [closed]

We have heard what you told us. We've heard what you told us. We heard what you told us. As far as I know, the first two are OK. There have been enough discussions here on the subject. The third ...
5
votes
3answers
559 views

Is using past participle instead of present one more polite?

On christianity.stackexchange.com I asked this question: "Is it true that John Paul the Second restored the practice of selling indulgences in 2000?" and one supporter suggested that I replace ...
0
votes
1answer
4k views

“Overlaid” or “overlain” as an adjective [closed]

I have a set of three images, which I have put on top of each other in an image editing program and made transparent. I would like the filename to describe what I have done with the component images. ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Generalised rule for verb usage in simple present tense using participle

I'm doing a school exercise where I have to give an explanation of the underlined (or in this case bold) verb usage in given sentences, following this format: I was waiting. past continuous ...
2
votes
1answer
24k views

'Seen as' or 'seeing as'

Look at these examples: You should clean the milk seen as you spilt it. You should clean the milk seeing as you spilt it. Which one is correct, and how is it grammatically defined/termed?
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Past tense vs Past participle tense [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Present perfect tense versus past tense Here is the example: I haven't spoken any English for more than 3 years. vs. I didn't speak any English over the past 3 ...
2
votes
5answers
2k views

What is the grammatical difference behind “is interesting” and “is interested”?

I am a native English speaker, yet I cannot explain to a non-native speaker why I say: I am interested in history. as well as History is interesting to me. Why is it "is interesting" when ...