Questions about past participle forms of verbs.

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0
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3answers
70 views

What's the difference between an adjective and a past participle?

I'm really confused about the object the doctor specialized will help you or the documents required How can I tell in the future, if I have to use the past participle or the adjective? And ...
2
votes
2answers
86 views

Should I use a hyphen after -ly when modifying a verb in the past participle verb?

Which of these are acceptable? Is one preferable over the other? "Chemically-deposited tourmaline is never periwinkle." "Chemically deposited tourmaline is never periwinkle." Also, is the title to ...
3
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2answers
103 views

Roast duck vs. roasted duck

We can say ‘fried fish’, ‘baked potato’ or ‘minced pork’ using past participles for modifiers. However, ‘roast’ is different - either ‘roast duck’ or ‘roasted duck’ works, it seems to me. How should ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Changing tenses

I am a sports writer and was wondering if this sentence is wrong because it starts in the past tense and changes to past participle "Sophomore Chelsea Vujs recorded a double-double by scoring a ...
3
votes
1answer
121 views

Using “ran” as a past participle

I've got a document I'm reading, written by a co-worker. I know the co-worker in question grew up in the same Oklahoma town I did, although a slightly different part, and 15 years later. So while we ...
0
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2answers
97 views

Am I allowed to start a sentence with “Composed”?

Composed of an assortment of ten libraries including inhibitor library, stem cell signaling compound library, and anti-cancer compound library, among others, our bioactive screening libraries ...
1
vote
1answer
107 views

What is the difference between “self-imposed” and “self-inflicted”?

I'm writing something about Fyodor Dostoyevsky's Notes From Underground about how we sometimes revel in suffering. I want to then add ... much of which is not only self-inflicted, but also ...
5
votes
4answers
206 views

Does a laser “etch” things, or does it “engrave” them?

Which (if any) of these adjectives would you use for describing a surface that has been cut using a laser beam: a laser-etched surface a laser-engraved surface a laser-(something else) surface a ...
0
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2answers
4k views

“As evidenced by” or “as evident by”?

I have this sentence: Group theory is one of my favourite areas in mathematics, as evidenced by the fact that I chose to do two group theory modules in my undergraduate course. I am wondering if ...
1
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0answers
127 views

What is the rule for duplicating the last letter when adding “-ed”? [duplicate]

I wonder if there is any rule for doubling the p at the end of a stem. For example: stop — stopped but help — helped
1
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2answers
859 views

Present perfect tense with the verb 'is'

I would like to know how to use the verb to be and its past participle. For example: The rain is gone. Is is present perfect tense here?
0
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1answer
110 views

Meaning of “my having completed my packing” [closed]

I ran into this in a novel: This expedition began this morning almost an hour later than I had planned, despite my having completed my packing, and loaded the Ford with all necessary items well ...
0
votes
1answer
369 views

“Is missing” vs. “is missed” [closed]

I was wondering why we say "something is missing" instead of "something is missed"? If missed is an adjective then why we use it that way? E.g.: "The sword is missing".
0
votes
2answers
179 views

Opened vs open?

Is there are rule when to use opened vs open? I always get confused even though I've been speaking English as the dominant language for more than half my life. E.g. Is the door open(ed)? Which ...
0
votes
1answer
145 views

Is “grammered” a word?

Can I get any details about the word grammered? Is there any relation between it and "grammatically corrected" or "grilled and hammered"?
2
votes
4answers
615 views

Should I use “got” or “gotten” in the following sentence?

I can't figure out whether to use got or gotten in the following sentence: I no longer recognized my own skin, my own feelings, my own thoughts. It was as if the real me had got/gotten lost on ...
3
votes
2answers
197 views

What is the difference between “exhausted” and “enervated”?

What is the difference between exhausted and enervated when used to refer to human beings?
0
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2answers
96 views

“Those exposed to extreme cold” vs. “those who are exposed to extreme cold”

I saw the following example sentence in a TOEFL preparation book: To prevent frostbite, those exposed to extreme cold are advised to wiggle their fingers and toes to increase blood circulation. ...
2
votes
1answer
124 views

What is an adjective made from a verb called? For instance, “disconnected” in “a disconnected phone”

What would you call an adjective that is created from a verb? Typically, the adjective comes from the past participle form of the verb. For example: A disconnected phone A possessed man ...
2
votes
3answers
77 views

A better word for “synchronised”

I'm struggling to find a better and less "harsh" word for synchronised. I'm trying to convey a message of simplicity for our product which synchronizes viewing of documents on multiple iPads. (The ...
1
vote
2answers
161 views

Dropping the 'have' before a past participle [closed]

We have heard what you told us. We've heard what you told us. We heard what you told us. As far as I know, the first two are OK. There have been enough discussions here on the subject. The third ...
5
votes
2answers
128 views

How is “stripping such words as remained of orthodox meanings” meant to be understood grammatically?

I was wondering if someone could help me out with a certain phrase I want to grasp the meaning of. I have two different meanings in my mind, and I was hoping that someone could point out the right ...
-1
votes
1answer
83 views

Motivated or Motivating

Which answer is correct? The renovation project has been led by a highly _____ group of designers. A) motivated B) motivating If not B, why not?
2
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2answers
1k views

“sunk” or “sunken”?

The boat lies half-sunken in the bay. Sunken is an adjective, right? But in the previous sentence, it seems to be acting as adverb modifying lies. Should the sentence be: The boat ...
3
votes
2answers
92 views

“Disjoint toolsets” vs. “disjointed toolsets”

I have only ever heard the expression there are disjoint sets, never that there are disjointed sets. I believe it should be disjoint sets, but I don't have a good reason why. Does anyone have a more ...
1
vote
3answers
219 views

They cheerleaded for it? or cheerled?

Is this the best way to conjugate "cheerlead"? they cheerleaded for it just the same "Cheerlead" becomes unrecognizable when you say "they cheerled", so I'm guessing this is why you don't ...
1
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2answers
2k views

“having worked” vs “having been working” difference

I would like to have someone explain the difference here: Having worked there for a year.. Having been working there for a year.. `
1
vote
1answer
85 views

“The paper on Monday published X” vs. “the paper published on Monday X”

What would be the best position of Monday in the following sentence — before or after the verb? The paper on Monday published what the artist called a blunt attack on people’s right to privacy. ...
3
votes
3answers
305 views

Administrating vs Admining

I get the sense that the word "Admining", like the word "Admin" from which it derives, is used to refer to computer administration, while "Administrating", like "Administrator", is used more when it ...
1
vote
2answers
99 views

How would you apply the idiom “I'm $verb'ed out” to “eat”?

I've often heard people apply the suffix -ed after a verb to create phrase, "I'm $verb'ed out." They do this to mean that they've already done $verb, and don't intend to do it in the immediate future ...
0
votes
1answer
151 views

“All that is needing” vs. “all that is needed”

I've read the following quote from Game of Thrones: Opening your eyes is all that is needing. The heart lies and the head plays tricks with us, but the eyes see true. English is not my mother ...
3
votes
1answer
548 views

Use of “very” to modify verb participles used as adjectives - correct or not and why?

I have seen several obituaries with this kind of wording: "He is very missed." It looks and sounds wrong, perhaps because "very" can modify adjectives ("He is very tall") and adverbs ("He walks very ...
5
votes
3answers
524 views

Is using past participle instead of present one more polite?

On christianity.stackexchange.com I asked this question: "Is it true that John Paul the Second restored the practice of selling indulgences in 2000?" and one supporter suggested that I replace ...
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votes
2answers
250 views

“This may get confused” or “This may get confusing” [closed]

This morning I was talking to a friend and I came out with the sentence: "This picture may get confused" with the meaning "This picture is so strange that you could get confused" then I started ...
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votes
2answers
80 views

Event: “archived” vs. “filed” vs. “shelved”

I'm coding a database that has an Events table with a status field. When an event's date has not yet passed, the status is Published. I would like to use a term to mean that the date of the event has ...
2
votes
1answer
4k views

What is the past participle of the verb open?

I'm French and I'd like to be precise on the conjugation of the verb "open". On this picture, I'd write "opened" instead of "open". Could you tell me more about why they have written "open"?
3
votes
4answers
550 views

What does “plenaried” mean in this phrase?

A recently-asked question, since deleted by its author, prompts the following question. In a 12 March 2013 New York Times column called The Axis of Ennui, David Brooks concluded with: What are ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Present participle vs. past participle

How to distinguish the difference between the two of them? For example, in the following sentence: Local times, originating from X and perpetuated by Y, have been abolished. Why can I not use ...
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2answers
228 views

Is this a proper use of the word “vested?”

Does the following sentence use the word "vested" correctly? Those vested in keeping you from creating change want you to believe that change is futile.
0
votes
1answer
2k views

“Overlaid” or “overlain” as an adjective [closed]

I have a set of three images, which I have put on top of each other in an image editing program and made transparent. I would like the filename to describe what I have done with the component images. ...
0
votes
1answer
68 views

Subscribed/unsubscribed

I am using a notification system where I have trouble naming a category of user. A user can subscribe to the newsletter of the week. If the user set his settings, and decides to receive the ...
-1
votes
3answers
312 views

“Restricted quality” vs. “limited quality” [closed]

I want to express that an entity has different levels of quality concerning some criterion and these levels are ordered. For an example, I have five different levels: Entity X is of high quality ...
0
votes
1answer
98 views

“It is” + present simple

If it is build here, it will be next to a large housing estate. Can anyone tell me if "it is build" in the above sentence is correct? And if so, why isn't it in the form "it is" + past ...
0
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3answers
1k views

Another way of saying “being judged”

What is another way of saying "being judged?" The context is: Being judged gave me an open mind about the different ways other cultures are judged and treated as well. Being criticized ...
2
votes
3answers
419 views

Are “coded” and “encoded” synonymous?

I was creating a domain for a website, but I couldn't understand the difference (if there is any) between the words coded and encoded. What's the right use of them? Or are they just synonyms I can ...
2
votes
1answer
80 views

How to use the word “wagered”

In a game of slot machines, can you call a payline you bet on "a wagered payline"? I am not sure if it is the payline that is wagered, or my money are wagered on (upon?) this payline.
3
votes
2answers
611 views

Irregular past tense confusion with compound noun/verb. More examples?

Students of martial arts may be familiar with a breakfall, which can (depending on the situation) be treated as a noun or a verb. I am often amused when speakers, even native English speakers (myself ...
4
votes
6answers
46k views

“Belated happy birthday” or “happy belated birthday”?

What's the correct sentence? Belated happy birthday! Happy belated birthday!
0
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2answers
131 views

On the usage of “epitomized”

Epitomized by right captainship, the ship reached safely to the harbor. I'm emphasizing the capabilities of the captain here. Is this correct usage?
6
votes
1answer
428 views

Pronunciation of “-ed” endings

I noticed that the final -ed has different pronunciations. What's the general rule for knowing the correct pronunciation?