1
vote
1answer
96 views

“I let him do it” and “I allow him to do it”, why exactly does one require 'to'?

I let him do it. and I allow him to do it. Why does the latter require to? What are the "rules" of using to with an infinitive? When is it necessary?
0
votes
1answer
52 views

“How to *verb* this thing *another verb*…” vs. “How to *verb* this thing TO *another verb*…”?

Which one from the following two variants is the correct one? How to make this thing to work...? How to make this thing work...? I'm not an English speaker, but for me, the first variant sounds ...
1
vote
0answers
3k views

How to use particles like 'back', 'on', 'off', 'around', 'up', 'down' or 'out' are used sometimes with phrasal verbs? Use of English [closed]

How to use particles like 'back', 'on', 'off', 'around', 'up', 'down' or 'out' are used sometimes with phrasal verbs? back - return on - continue off - travel to another place around - do ...
2
votes
3answers
509 views

give a lift to or without “to”?

Reading a text I have seen the following: A man and two girls he gave a lift to. But doesn't this mean that I can say "give a lift to"? What about this: I gave my friend a lift. I gave a ...
4
votes
4answers
291 views

The verb “to get” + particle …?

In the phrase "to get all crazy" am I correct when I say that the "all crazy" is a particle phrase? Example: I'm up for tonight's party. I'm going to get all crazy.
1
vote
0answers
98 views

Is it correct to say “John helps you talk with people”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the correct way to use infinitive after the verb "help": with or without "to"? Sorry if this is a stupid question, but English is not my first language. For me ...
27
votes
10answers
46k views

What is the correct way to use infinitive after the verb “help”: with or without “to”?

What is the correct way to use infinitive after the verb "help": with or without "to"? For example: Please, help me to understand this. or: Please, help me understand this.