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-1
votes
2answers
38 views

In writing and speaking, which one can I use? have took or taken [closed]

Which one is correct? I have took the class or I have taken the class? Would it be ok it I use I have took in spoken language?
1
vote
1answer
111 views

“I let him do it” and “I allow him to do it”, why exactly does one require 'to'?

I let him do it. and I allow him to do it. Why does the latter require to? What are the "rules" of using to with an infinitive? When is it necessary?
0
votes
2answers
51 views

“Made look better” vs. “made to look better”

Results are made to look better by... Results are made look better by... Are both correct? Is there another way of phrasing this sentence?
5
votes
3answers
373 views

Particle or preposition?

I'm studying Spanish and I have some questions about the grammatical parallels in English. Le gustan cocinar y hornear. He likes to cook and (to) bake. When an infinitive is used in ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

“How to *verb* this thing *another verb*…” vs. “How to *verb* this thing TO *another verb*…”?

Which one from the following two variants is the correct one? How to make this thing to work...? How to make this thing work...? I'm not an English speaker, but for me, the first variant sounds ...
3
votes
1answer
77 views

“I can't remember things as I used” — why not “as I used to”?

There's a line in Alice in Wonderland: I can't remember things as I used—and I don't keep the same size for ten minutes together! I wonder why the 'to' has been omitted from the verb 'used to'. ...
0
votes
2answers
86 views

What is the second “to” in “to take this opportunity to foreground poetry”?

That’s why it’s particularly appropriate for us to take this opportunity to foreground poetry as an aural experience. — Source Is this "to" the same as "something to say?" P.S.: Isn't ...
1
vote
2answers
99 views

What is the function of this “to” here?

Old people did not know enough once, perchance, to fetch fresh fuel to keep the fire a-going; new people put a little dry wood under a pot, and are whirled round the globe with the speed of birds, ...
0
votes
1answer
214 views

“Do you still want me to do X” vs. “do you still want that I do X”

Which is correct? Do you still want me to do the project for you? Do you still want that I do the project for you?
1
vote
1answer
96 views

Is the second “to” grammatical in “I plan to help build and then to start”?

I wrote this sentence: I plan to help build a strategic vision for Arabic digital content and then to start implementing that vision. I want to produce value-added information in a specific ...
1
vote
0answers
3k views

How to use particles like 'back', 'on', 'off', 'around', 'up', 'down' or 'out' are used sometimes with phrasal verbs? Use of English [closed]

How to use particles like 'back', 'on', 'off', 'around', 'up', 'down' or 'out' are used sometimes with phrasal verbs? back - return on - continue off - travel to another place around - do ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

What's the difference between “a year”, “per year” and “out of a year”?

Suppose I want to say that I'm at sea seven months out of twelve. (Just an example.) I think I can say "I'm at sea 7 months a year" or "I'm at sea 7 months per year" or "I'm at sea 7 ...
0
votes
2answers
84 views

Is there any semantic difference to have a particle after transitive verb?

“There was a time when I supposed my job was to pass on the teaching of the Church.” (The Secret Intensity of Everyday Life) The example has the phrasal verb, pass on, and its object (the ...
2
votes
3answers
531 views

give a lift to or without “to”?

Reading a text I have seen the following: A man and two girls he gave a lift to. But doesn't this mean that I can say "give a lift to"? What about this: I gave my friend a lift. I gave a ...
7
votes
2answers
436 views

“put X down to” vs. “put down X to”: subjects of verbs with two particles

I expect I would have to put down many coats to do the job. (SOURCE) One factor to distinguish phrasal verbs from prepositional verbs is particle movement. Phrasal verbs can place the particle ...
2
votes
2answers
126 views

“Down” in “hung down the front…”

"A bush grew out of the gutter and hung down the front of the house." Could anybody please explain where in the above sentence 'down' belongs? It could belong to 'hang' a bit like a phrasal verb, or ...
4
votes
4answers
295 views

The verb “to get” + particle …?

In the phrase "to get all crazy" am I correct when I say that the "all crazy" is a particle phrase? Example: I'm up for tonight's party. I'm going to get all crazy.
1
vote
0answers
98 views

Is it correct to say “John helps you talk with people”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the correct way to use infinitive after the verb "help": with or without "to"? Sorry if this is a stupid question, but English is not my first language. For me ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

“To enable him to escape” vs. “to enable him escape”

I have been coming across this kind of sentence more and more: She gave him a key to enable him to escape capture. She gave him a key to enable him escape capture. Which sentence is correct? ...
28
votes
10answers
50k views

What is the correct way to use infinitive after the verb “help”: with or without “to”?

What is the correct way to use infinitive after the verb "help": with or without "to"? For example: Please, help me to understand this. or: Please, help me understand this.