A participle is a form of a verb that is used in a sentence to modify a noun, noun phrase, verb or verb phrase, and thus plays a role similar to that of an adjective or adverb.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

6
votes
3answers
1k views

Past participle of a verb created from an acronym

Standard GPL would require that those applications be GPL'd (or compatible licensing), whereas LGPL requires only the library's source to be made available. Is the use of words like GPL'd common ...
27
votes
3answers
47k views

What's the difference between a gerund and a participle?

What is the difference between a gerund and a participle?
2
votes
2answers
519 views

Order of participial adjective

I'm proof-reading a thesis by one of my friends and there's some recurring construct which I always mark as false but I'd like to check with you. In the comments I was told that the example I ...
27
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the name for the process which turned “iced cream” into “ice cream”?

There are several words (mostly related to food) which are shortenings of their historical forms. For example, the cold treat ice cream was originally known as iced cream in the 1680s. The -ed ending ...
18
votes
6answers
5k views

When can the -ing form of a verb be placed before a noun?

My native-speaker's grammatical intuition tells me that: There is a sleeping man under the tree. is fine but There is a fishing man by the river bank. is wrong. Why? I've thought about ...
3
votes
8answers
4k views

“Visualized” equivalent adjective for audio

Are there such words as "audiolized" or "audibilized"? EDIT: Merriam-Webster has the word Audibilized indexed with no definition! What I was trying to achieve was to say that something is an ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

Looking forward to follow vs. following [duplicate]

I was reading this today: We look forward to following your progress. Am I correct in thinking that it is missing a be or that -ing should be removed? So We look forward to be following your ...
1
vote
1answer
91 views

Can a present participle follow a subject?

Which is correct, and why? some days we went on adventures — him maneuvering our scooter, me resting my chin … or some days we went on adventures — he maneuvering our scooter, I resting my ...
20
votes
9answers
11k views

Can anyone give me a grammatical explanation as to why “that being said” is proper English?

A certain pedant is claiming that beginning a sentence with "That being said" is grammatically incorrect owing to the apparent logical contradiction in claiming that something in the past (e.g. the ...
6
votes
2answers
571 views

Participial clause?

On ELL a user has asked how to parse the emphasized -ing form in this sentence from Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone: Harry swung at it with the bat to stop it from breaking his nose, and ...
7
votes
3answers
2k views

Why do non-native English speakers get the present participle wrong?

I see people saying things like this: With a new infusion of cash it allows to make the film. ...instead of... With a new infusion of cash it allows making the film. I can't find a ...
5
votes
4answers
5k views

“Sour cream” versus “soured cream”

Does anyone besides my husband insist on adding an -ed to sour cream? Etymonline dates "sour cream" to 1855, but has no mention of "soured", so I don't think this is analogous to "iced tea" or "ice ...
3
votes
2answers
541 views

Is “hanging bats” a participial phrase, gerund phrase, or simple noun phrase?

In the sentence "Hanging bats populate most of the caves in North America," what is the role of "hanging bats"? I believe it is a simple noun phrase containing the participle "hanging" (which ...
2
votes
2answers
440 views

Dangling Participial Phrase [closed]

Here’s the original: The veterinarian was caught off guard when, regaining consciousness, we were again attacked by the cat. My rewrite of this sentence is either: The veterinarian was ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Is that an adverbial participle? Should there be a comma?

I found the following sentence: In part of my spare time, I work on fun projects. I am not sure as to whether there should be a comma. If it is there, then this obeys some rules, for example on ...
0
votes
1answer
196 views

Word order of participial modifiers and proper nouns

This is a follow-up to this earlier question. I want to say that I met a person and they were drunk at the time. Which should I use: I saw intoxicated John. I saw the intoxicated John. I saw John ...