A participle is a form of a verb that is used in a sentence to modify a noun, noun phrase, verb or verb phrase, and thus plays a role similar to that of an adjective or adverb.

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How do I choose between a noun and a participle when picking one to use as an adjective?

I know that I can use both a noun and a particle as an adjective but what do I have to ask myself when choosing between them? For instance: Talking points, talk points Information ...
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24 views

Had + past participle or Would Have + past participle?

I would like to know which sentence is grammatically correct and why? If I am talking about a hypothetical case and I want to know what would happen if something have occurred. For example: I turned ...
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81 views

What are these “[verb]-ing” forms called? [duplicate]

How would you describe the bolded words here? They don't intuitively seem like present participles to me, but I might be wrong.   List X can be created by appending the contents of List B to ...
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54 views

Comma before adverbial participial phrases (reduced adverbial phrases) and participial prepositions

Another tricky comma question that has recently popped up in my line work that I have not been able to resolve to my satisfaction. Apologies it's a bit long, but all parts are related and additional ...
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Why is there no comma between this participle phrase and the main clause

I searched around, and they said that all the participle phrases are happening concurrently with the main clause. Hm, I thought they are consecutively happening, according to ...
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86 views

Nobody was surprised at John being absent (present participle or gerund?)

Some time ago I learned the difference between Present Participle and Gerund and today I decided to pass any online test to make sure I get it. So, I passed it having made the only mistake which is ...
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48 views

Present participle and perfect participle in subordinate clause [closed]

In what case can the present participle / perfect participle replace a subordinate clause? If the subject of the main clause differs from the subject in the subordinate clause, how is the subordinate ...
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34 views

“Not to have been asked” vs “not being asked”- what's the difference?

Sentence Transformation: She will be upset that she wasn't asked. The answer to this statement is as follows: She will be upset not to have been asked. Could this also be possible? She ...
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32 views

The way the past participle is used in these sentences

First, this is the meaning I am trying to put in writing: She could not tolerate the sight of them as they were being put to death. And I want the progressive aspect to be clear. Which of ...
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36 views

Present perfect or present perfect continuous with a participle? [duplicate]

I'm trying to figure out what tense (or tenses) are involved when you have a participle with "to be." Examples: Ballet is performed in the theatre. Decorum is maintained in the ballroom. English is ...
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20 views

Categorization & Validity of a clause

if I have the sentence "A killing B is called murder." is "A killing B" a regular participle clause or is that impossible because it has a subject? In other words: Can a participle clause have a ...
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39 views

Using preposition “with” [closed]

I don't know what the difference between these sentences is, especially the use of present participle and past participle. One is "with my back leaning against the wall", the other is "with arms ...
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How are Old English participles declened to English participles? (both present and past) [duplicate]

I'm trying to learn about differences between English and Old English and I found that there are some noticeable differences in the use of participle markings. I think historically, there had been the ...
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81 views

Seem small clause

It is said that the omission of "to be" is allowed only when the adjective (phrases), noun (phrases), or prepositional phrase comes after the to be like this: a He seemed (to be) angry about the ...
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39 views

Why did the author use “muttering” instead of “mutters” in this sentence?

"He wanders away from the group, muttering something about fingers and toes." - The hunger game, Mockingjay. And can you give me the name of this grammar structure? Is it short form of relative ...
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50 views

Participle phrase at the end of the sentence

When participle phrase comes at the end of the sentence, it usually modifies the subject. 1 He smiled nervously with a chocolate in his hands, thinking that the end has come. Here, participle ...
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44 views

Which clauses with phrases

Can which clause modify participle phrases? Which clause is usually used for summarizing or explaining the clause before it. 1 His wife was stunning, which was always his pride. 2 I left ...
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59 views

Adverb of manner and participle in subjective participle construction

Why is an adverb of manner placed before participle in the sentence "We watched the temperature gradually rising"? I know that if the verb is transitive, then the adverb of manner can be placed ...
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33 views

participle phrase or to-infinitive phrase

In response to the long-term measures recommended by the School Board, the then Principal initiated the Pledge Day on “Clean LA", to encourage all schools to make the “Clean LA” commitment on ...
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171 views

'Participle phrase', 'Participle clause', 'Participle construction'

I am studying in Korean. In my grammar book, below sentences are called 'participle phrase' 1) Seeing police officer, he ran away. 2) Buying it online, you have to use a paypal. 3) Realizing his ...
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545 views

“Complicated” or “complicating”

Can anyone tell me why sentence (A) is wrong, and (B) is correct? (A) "The topic of landmines is very heavy and complicating." (B) "The topic of landmines is very heavy and complicated." To ...
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2answers
868 views

'Relates to' vs. 'Is Related to'

Does the choice between passive/active voice make any difference in the examples below? My question relates to your earlier work. My question is related to you earlier work. Nerve cells relate to ...
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98 views

Are copulars considered linking, helping, or auxiliaries?

I'm having a hard time understanding why most people consider the infinitive to be and all of its verb base forms helping verbs. I've consulted multiple English grammar sites and forums, and most of ...
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Is this the correct explanation of the difference between “excited” and “exciting”, “bored” and “boring”, etc?

Ok, there are many websites that explain this, but I think they are not clear. Here is what I came up with: -the adjective with "-ed" like excited or bored: a person or other animal has received ...
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40 views

pronoun/noun followed by present participle [duplicate]

I would really resent him doing this project. I would really resent his doing this project. What I suspect is that the difference between in these sentences is that the emphasis is put upon ...
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328 views

Posititon of an adverb of manner with participles

I have seen many rules about position of an adverbs with finite forms of verbs but I can't find the rule about where to place an adverb with nonfinitive verbs. For example which of the sentence sounds ...
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61 views

Which one is correct: “to have verbed” or “verbing”?

I have two confusing sentences and I am in two minds whether the first or the second is more grammatically correct: He was by far the most knowledgeable person to have commented on the subject, so ...
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139 views

“Escaped” and “retired”

I want to check if what I know is correct or not. We can say "escaped prisoners". In this phrase, "escaped" works as a pre-modifier of "prisoner". But, we cannot use it as a post-modifier like "the ...
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623 views

using both Past Simple and Past Perfect in the same paragraph

Is there a rule about consistency within a paragraph, of using past tense and past participle in alternate sentences? In my writing class, I notice some writers mix the two freely. Since I see this ...
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Confused: I have a tendency to begin sentences after semicolon by using verbs in the participle. What am I doing wrong?

From the marker of my essay: The author has a tendency to begin sentences after semicolon by using verbs in the participle. bold is the problem. I have made up some sentences which demonstrate this ...
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115 views

Participle clauses with past participles

I have read many times that "participle clauses with past participles have a passive meaning" but I came across this sentence which made me confused.Is this sentence grammatically correct? ...
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81 views

Participle phrases

When I was studying participle phrases, I came across a sentence on a grammar teaching website, which I find trustful.The sentence is : Opening the envelope, I found two concert tickets. And ...
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105 views

Survey Question

I have drafted an internal employee survey focused around "inclusion". One of the questions has been vetoed incorrect by my supervisor, while I maintain that the original is grammatically correct. ...
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'watch her run' vs 'watch her running' [duplicate]

QUESTION 1 I'm trying to figure out the seemingly subtle difference(s) between a sentence modified by a bare infinitive and one modified by a participle phrase. What do you get out of these: I ...
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282 views

Is there a better term for “perfect infinitive”, “perfect participle” or “perfect gerund”?

BACKGROUND There are grammar terms such as 'present perfect' and 'past perfect' as in: She has learned English for 10 years. [present perfect] She had learned English when she was little. ...
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85 views

grammatical elements in 'as + ing'?

In dictionary, I see phrases in the form of 'as + ing' quite many times, for example, attribute : regard something as being caused by (something or someone) Is 'as' here a preposition or ...
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68 views

A question regarding a parallel

I came across a very neat parallel, but I wonder if I can use the structure today without setting off alarm in an editor's head. A stretch of a series is any piece taken out of it, and not having ...
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692 views

Existential sentence…in the passive voice?

Now, a friend over the internet wanted me to explain the passive voice to him. He began by providing his story's "readability statistics" of Microsoft Word, which said that 7% of his sentences were ...
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3answers
137 views

is “imperative” correct here

I am writing a piece of software related to meetings. Participants are invited to a meeting using a button which the command "invite" is written to be pressed by the person who wished to do the ...
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126 views

Is the participle clause in “the marlin left a blood trail attracting sharks” correct? [closed]

I'm writing a summary of the novel "The old man and the sea". And I'm trying to use participle clauses (a subject that I'm currently learning). I've learnt that you can use a participle clause to ...
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225 views

Word order of participial modifiers and proper nouns

This is a follow-up to this earlier question. I want to say that I met a person and they were drunk at the time. Which should I use: I saw intoxicated John. I saw the intoxicated John. I saw John ...
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682 views

Infinitive of purpose or “for verb-ing”

The chambers inside the pyramid were closed (to/for) visitors (to clean and repair/for cleaning and repairing). Which is the correct alternative in both the brackets, and why? Please explain in ...
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172 views

“IT projects gone awry…” Qualifying a reduced relative clause rule

"IT projects gone awry because they were conceived on too massive a scale, and good money thrown after bad, are financial nuisances far from unique to the Beeb." ['Beeb' = BBC] I've been trying to ...
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829 views

Participles Modifying Direct Objects

Here's a simple question: Is is possible for a participle -- past or present -- to modify a direct object? "You deserve every ounce of respect garnered." Is this correct? My reasoning is based on the ...
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What is the word meaning “going on and on for miles and miles”?

Edit: I was walking down an intolerably long sidewalk one day, and every time a mounted another hill, I saw more of it seeming to stretch out before me. It got me to thinking: is there a word for ...
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2answers
98 views

Is this participle or gerund? [closed]

"Disturbed, she consulted her doctor about the symptoms."
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106 views

Can a present participle follow a subject?

Which is correct, and why? some days we went on adventures — him maneuvering our scooter, me resting my chin … or some days we went on adventures — he maneuvering our scooter, I resting my ...
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130 views

Can a participle contain a comparison to other object?

Can a participle contain a comparison to another object in the same sentence? For example, is the following sentence grammatically correct? "I can't see any vehicle moving at higher speed that ...
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600 views

Can a past participle phrase stand at the end of a sentence?

For a present participle phrase, I've seen: Seeking advice from the pros, she visited the website. She visited the website, seeking advice from the pros. For a past participle phrase, ...
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What is the correct use of present participle and “by” in a sequence of actions?

When writing a sequence of actions that happen after each other I get regularly confused about the correct use of the present participle. For example in: A: I prefer learning by gaining an ...