Linguistic categories explaining how words are used. Examples are the verb, the noun, the pronoun, the adjective, the adverb, the preposition, the conjunction, and the interjection.

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1answer
27 views

A few miles into the town — verbless clause, or adverbial phrase?

A few miles into the town, I saw a beautiful building that was now abandoned. I don't know if "a few miles into the town" is a verbless clause like this (Being) a few miles into the town, I saw ...
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1answer
1k views

Is the phrase “for one of both of us” grammatically correct?

In portal, Glados at one point says this: "and I thought of a solution that would be the best for one of both of us." I am debating about whether or not the construction of "for one of both of us" is ...
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1answer
42 views

Infinitive's Part of Speech in “Scientists have struggled for so many years to find them.”

Is "to find them" an adverbial of purpose or an adverbial of result? In other words, which of the following two sentences is closer to the sentence in the subject line: Scientists have ...
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0answers
88 views

Part of speech in a sentence

In the sentence: " I let him take the pen ... are the mentioned functions correct? I = subject let = main verb him = indirect Object take = the second verb (bare infinitive) the pen = Direct ...
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0answers
94 views

What part of speech is “on” in the phrase “Bring it on home (to me)”?

If I had to guess I'd say it's an adverb, modifying the verb "bring," but it seems like it could also be interpreted as a preposition with "home" as the object. Both? Neither? Thanks for any help.
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0answers
12 views

Is “to say” in Hamlet's “and by a sleep to say we end” an infinitive or an adverb?

I was trying to identify the word classes of Hamlet's famous monologue "To be or not to be", and I'm really having trouble deciding what word class "to say" in "and by sleep to say we end the ...
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0answers
42 views

Resolution for the double “the” problem

Consider the following sentence: "With the Nike shirt, your workout will be complete". How will I say the same thing about a shirt of the brand "The North Face"? The least awkward option will ...
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0answers
51 views

Pronunciation of “Attribute”

My question: Is it common to use the same pronunciation of the word "attribute" for both the verb and noun? If so, how does this vary geographically? Explanation: I'm from Michigan and have always ...
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0answers
14 views

Is this a prepositional phrase?

I'm trying to remember the grammatical term used to describe this part of speech. The term "prepositional phrase" comes to mind, but I think it might be something different. It's the part of a ...
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0answers
60 views

No one made above a B today — adverbial or ellipsis

So as I was watching a movie, there was this sentence: No one made above a B today. It stimulated my curiosity greatly. "Make" is supposed to be a transitive verb in this sentence, and therefore ...
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0answers
45 views

What type of prose poetry is this?

When I use the first line as a metaphor/imagery and the second line as its literal translation, as in this oversimplified example: She is my coffeehouse She restores my energy or even ...
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0answers
41 views

“Come home.” — other adverbs which refer to the noun versions of themselves?

In the phrase Come home. the word 'home' is playing the role of adverb, and essentially means 'to or towards home'. It is interesting to me that it has a rather recursive definition; are there ...
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0answers
120 views

“Data card deposited with Jon Doe.” Is this sentence correct?

"Data card deposited with Jon Doe." Vs "Data card deposited to Jon Doe." which is the correct sentence? Situation is that some device has been returned to the concerned department personnel.
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0answers
349 views

What is the grammatical function of “in my opinion”?

In phrases such as "X is better than Y in my opinion" what is the grammatical function of the phrase "in my opinion"? I know that prepositional phrases can function as adverbs or adjective depending ...
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0answers
83 views

“All of” + possessives

May I ask a question about the correct use of all of? As far as I understood from a previous post, of must be used when followed by a pronoun. What happens with possessives? In this example: ...