Linguistic categories explaining how words are used. Examples are the verb, the noun, the pronoun, the adjective, the adverb, the preposition, the conjunction, and the interjection.

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6
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4answers
1k views

Is this noun used as an adjective?

I read this recently in The Economist: At the end of the summit, the French and European officials had claimed a points victory over the Germans by getting them to agree more firmly to a ...
13
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3answers
12k views

Is “of ” necessary in “all of ”?

Listen to all your fans vs Listen to all of  your fans OR Name all the states vs Name all of  the states What part of language is of  in these examples? Is it necessary or ...
6
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5answers
13k views

What part of speech does “here” have in “I am here”?

What part of speech does here have in the following sentence? I am here. I say that in that sentence, here must be an adverb because: It modifies the verb am by describing where I am. Am is a ...
6
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7answers
21k views

What part of speech is “there” when used in “There is (blah blah)”?

What part of speech is there in the sentence “There is a book on the table?” Also, while typing it out, another question pops up vis-à-vis punctuation. In my complete first sentence above, I ended it ...
32
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6answers
3k views

What is the lexical class of the word 'worth' when used in a sentence like “Is this apple worth $3?”

The question "Not worth the paper it's printed on" - wrong meaning? got me thinking about what part of speech, or lexical class, the word 'worth' takes? A comment in "Is it worth ...
15
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6answers
3k views

Is “so” a pronoun?

Reminded by What is the grammatical function of so in this sentence, something that has always bothered me is that the word "so" can be used as a pronoun: It looks like rain Responding with: ...
11
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4answers
1k views

“Employee” in the phrase “employee ID” is a determiner, not an adjective—right?

I am a software developer with a bit of a linguistic slant. We were recently given some training on how to name database fields and were told to avoid adjectives in names. Then we were given an ...
9
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5answers
3k views

Parts of speech and functions: “Bob made a book collector happy the other day”

Having been bamboozled by various questions and answers on this site, I'd like to know what are the parts of speech (POS) and grammatical functions of the words and phrases in the following sentence: ...
11
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5answers
3k views

What part of speech are non-human “interjections” like “oink” and “bang”?

As a spin-off from this comment: If a human exclaims something like "ouch!", I believe it's considered an interjection. But if a pig exclaims "oink!", what is the part of speech? And if a bell goes ...
4
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2answers
4k views

Grammar of “married” in “getting married”

What is the grammar of the word married in this sentence? They are getting married in April.
1
vote
4answers
972 views

Is there a term for the phenomenon where the same word forms more than one part of speech?

Is there a term for e.g. the lexical symbol "duck"? It is both a verb and a noun, in contemporary use having no apparent connection, and so would appear to be represent two words. Then, is the a ...
20
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6answers
3k views

How can I prove a word is a noun?

When I read a sentence, I can identify nouns. But now I need to give proof that they are indeed nouns, and that is where it goes wrong. I can think of one or two things sometimes (like combining it ...
11
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4answers
430 views

Is “now” a “preposition”?

My question starts from this question which asks about difference between currently and right now, which is not that complicated. However, in the middle of exchanging comments, I found a few points ...
7
votes
3answers
3k views

What part-of-speech will the new “because” be?

The American Dialect Society has voted because as the Word of the Year owing to its increased use in phrases such as "because happy," "because sad," and "because bored." Since it takes an object, it ...
4
votes
2answers
607 views

What evidence is there that 'to' belongs to any particular part of speech?

Reopen note: There is a quite finite and modest amount of evidence in the literature about this issue, which members can record here as they see fit. Less than there is for example about what a noun ...
13
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4answers
3k views

New Oxford American Dictionary describes “the” as an adjective

When I look at the definition given from the Mac OS X Dictionary (I have set American English as interface language, and the dictionary used is then the New Oxford American Dictionary), I read: ...
9
votes
4answers
2k views

What part of speech is “worth”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the lexical class of the word 'worth' when used in a sentence like “Is this apple worth $3?” In a sentence like the following: The ...
4
votes
3answers
3k views

Postpositions in English and “ago”

I was informed earlier today that the word ago is actually a postposition and the only one of its kind in English. Is this correct? If so, why do dictionaries not use this classification and prefer ...
4
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8answers
2k views

What is the difference between a part of speech and a syntactic function / grammatical relation?

What is the difference between a part-of-speech and a function? In other words: What is a part of speech. (e.g. noun) What is a grammatical function. (e.g. head, subject) [read "grammatical ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Can adjectives always be used as nouns when they denote a plural and are preceded by the definite article?

An adjective appears to be used as a noun when denoting an animate plural and preceded by the definite article: 'The successful are those who strive.' 'The foolish are those who ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

I am looking forward to …? (followed by a Gerund)? [duplicate]

I know, that I am looking forward to hearing from you. is correct. But I am not sure, if this holds also for other verbs? So is I am looking forward to taste your cookies. or is I ...
13
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2answers
2k views

Is it true that a word ending in -y is more likely to be an adjective than a noun?

Claim: a word ending in -y is most likely not a noun but an adjective. Don't have my tagged corpus handy to check. Anyone have the stats on Parts-Of-Speech of words ending in y and assuming they ...
11
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5answers
10k views

How many different parts of speech can the f-word be used as?

In an "interesting" thread of comments we began to look at the word fuck in several different uses. Most of them were interjections and verb uses as would be expected. But, perhaps dialectally, the ...
11
votes
6answers
51k views

Is “yesterday” a noun?

Are words like "yesterday" and "tomorrow" considered nouns, adjectives, or even adverbs? I'm getting mixed signals from several references. In a case like "I have an important meeting tomorrow," it ...
12
votes
7answers
2k views

What part of speech is “telling” in “that would be telling”?

In the phrase "that would be telling", what is the word "telling"? I think it would be either an adjective or a verb, but which is it? Neither seems to be obviously wrong. I think the former would ...
8
votes
9answers
20k views

What word can fulfill the most parts of speech?

I know there are several parts of speech: Noun Verb Pronoun Adjective Adverb Preposition Conjunction Interjection There might be others as well. Sometimes a word, depending on how it is used, can ...
10
votes
1answer
22k views

Yes, no, adverbs, and interjections

There appears to be some disagreement over what function yes and no perform in the following sentences: Yes, you are right. No, you are mistaken. According to ODO (yes, no), they are being used as ...
6
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5answers
2k views

“Love me tender”: adverb or adjective?

Is the last word in each of these phrases an adverb or an adjective? How can we know? love me tender treat me nice hold me tight
2
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2answers
2k views

Part of speech: “I am disappointed with”

In a construction such as, "John is disappointed with Alice", what part of speech is disappointed with? It appears to me that the "am" is a linking verb. Similarly, "Jessica is sad", it seems to me ...
0
votes
1answer
17k views

How to know what part of speech is “there” in some cases? [closed]

I've been doing some ELA homework and I noticed that 'there' is not always the same POS. It seems to be an adverb, a noun, a pronoun, and several other POS in various contexts. How would one ...
12
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0answers
1k views

“They are Australian” vs “They are Australians” [migrated]

On the very first page of "Essential Grammar in Use" book of R.Murphy. He wrote Those people aren't English. They're Australian. My question are Is this sentence grammatically correct? What ...
7
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9answers
14k views

Is “architect” a verb and a noun?

I hear the word architect used as a verb in the technical field and now more often in other industries and groups, for example: We need to architect a better solution to the problem. I am ...
5
votes
2answers
113 views

Is “which” a preposition? Because because

Backstory: Back in 2013 the American Dialect Society appointed because Word of the Year. People had begun using a new syntax: noun-phrases and adjectives could now follow because. In response Geoffrey ...
4
votes
4answers
3k views

Does “away” serve as an adverb or an adjective in the following sentence?

The shop is five minutes away. According to the dictionary, away is an adverb. An adverb modifies a verb. In the above example, what word does away modify? Why is away not an adjective? ...
4
votes
5answers
70k views

Part of speech of “very,” “extremely,” “really,” and “quite”

While working on developing the lexicon in one of my constructed languages, I encountered a slight difficulty in using standard classifications for words like very, extremely, really, and quite. To ...
4
votes
5answers
2k views

Can someone help me diagram this sentence?

I'm trying to do a sentence/phrase analysis of the following sentence. I just can't figure out, what would “No matter the season” be (Adv. of ...) in terms of sentence elements. And the next question ...
3
votes
3answers
7k views

When is “here” an adverb or a noun?

In the sentence "I hope you are all paying attention, here is a sentence I made earlier", is here an adverb or a noun? I think it is a noun, but if I substitute a noun or a pronoun for here, the ...
2
votes
2answers
899 views

'to' / 'rather than' / 'but' [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is correct: “prefer X to Y” or “prefer X over Y”? I prefer walking to taking the bus I prefer walking rather than taking the bus ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

“sufferings” is plural though it is uncountable,but how?

We know that there is no plural form of the "uncountable noun," but, for example, we write: His sufferings force us to retain pity for him. Is it possible to make an uncountable noun plural? If ...
8
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2answers
1k views

English parts of speech — better new treatments

Can anyone please recommend a better treatment of English parts of speech / word classes than that offered by most traditional grammars? Many of the latter stick with the sacrosanct 8 of antiquity, ...
6
votes
4answers
13k views

Part of speech for “please” followed by a verb

I know that "please" can be many different parts of speech; interjection, an adverb, or a verb, depending on how it's used. I'm looking specifically to find out what part of speech "please" is when ...
5
votes
3answers
384 views

Female adjective re job title

Why is it common to hear "women writers" or "woman doctor" but not "man author"? Isn't an adjective required in both cases, thus "female guitarist" and "male accountant"? I am asking about why the ...
4
votes
1answer
604 views

Is “it is a fun game” correct?

"It is a lot of fun," sounds correct, but not, "it is a fun game." Isn't fun a noun? Then why is it used as an adjective? I have heard this usage even by literary giants, so this cannot be a common ...
3
votes
2answers
994 views

Gerund Phrase as Subject

Is it acceptable to use a gerund phrase as the subject of a sentence? More generally, can a gerund phrase be used interchangeably with other nouns? For example: Understanding history enhances ...
2
votes
4answers
348 views

What is the general term that describes subjects and objects? (direct, indirect and prepositional objects)

John gave Jack money with enthusiasm. John is the subject, Jack the indirect object, money the direct object, and enthusiasm a prepositional object. Is there a general term that describes the ...
2
votes
1answer
154 views

What's the name for a part of speech which is not quite rhetorical, but not expected to be answered directly, either?

What's the name for a part of speech which is not quite rhetorical, but not expected to be answered directly, either? I know the word exists, it refers to greetings such as "How are you" and similar. ...
2
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2answers
2k views

Is “12:30” (the time of day) an abstract noun?

Nothing else to add, I just want to make sure.
1
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2answers
2k views

What part of speech are “plus”, “times”, and “minus”

In mathematics one will often say "This plus that" or "This times that". This means "This added too that" and "This multiplied by that". Multiply, Add, Subtract, Divide - All are verbs. But what part ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Is “British” a noun or an adjective in “British PM”?

While reading through this question another occurred to me. If a headline reads British PM says no to inflatable cars. Is British a noun or an adjective? Granted, there are other noun forms of ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

Is “on” part of a verb phrase in “Put Item on Hold?”

For an interface I'm working on, there's a command available to a user called "Put Item On Hold." Or possibly it should be "Put Item on Hold," since the style guide I'm using says that prepositions ...