Linguistic categories explaining how words are used. Examples are the verb, the noun, the pronoun, the adjective, the adverb, the preposition, the conjunction, and the interjection.

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7
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2answers
3k views

Is “of ” necessary in “all of ”?

Listen to all your fans vs Listen to all of  your fans OR Name all the states vs Name all of  the states What part of language is of  in these examples? Is it necessary or ...
30
votes
6answers
3k views

What is the lexical class of the word 'worth' when used in a sentence like “Is this apple worth $3?”

The question "Not worth the paper it's printed on" - wrong meaning? got me thinking about what part of speech, or lexical class, the word 'worth' takes? A comment in "Is it worth ...
6
votes
3answers
755 views

Is this noun used as an adjective?

I read this recently in The Economist: At the end of the summit, the French and European officials had claimed a points victory over the Germans by getting them to agree more firmly to a ...
6
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5answers
7k views

What part of speech does “here” have in “I am here”?

What part of speech does here have in the following sentence? I am here. I say that in that sentence, here must be an adverb because: It modifies the verb am by describing where I am. Am is a ...
5
votes
7answers
15k views

What part of speech is “there” when used in “There is (blah blah)”?

What part of speech is there in the sentence “There is a book on the table?” Also, while typing it out, another question pops up vis-à-vis punctuation. In my complete first sentence above, I ended it ...
11
votes
4answers
2k views

What part of speech are non-human “interjections” like “oink” and “bang”?

As a spin-off from this comment: If a human exclaims something like "ouch!", I believe it's considered an interjection. But if a pig exclaims "oink!", what is the part of speech? And if a bell goes ...
11
votes
4answers
727 views

“Employee” in the phrase “employee ID” is a determiner, not an adjective—right?

I am a software developer with a bit of a linguistic slant. We were recently given some training on how to name database fields and were told to avoid adjectives in names. Then we were given an ...
1
vote
4answers
664 views

Is there a term for the phenomenon where the same word forms more than one part of speech?

Is there a term for e.g. the lexical symbol "duck"? It is both a verb and a noun, in contemporary use having no apparent connection, and so would appear to be represent two words. Then, is the a ...
3
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1answer
3k views

Grammar of “married” in “getting married”

What is the grammar of the word married in this sentence? They are getting married in April.
13
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6answers
2k views

Is “so” a pronoun?

Reminded by What is the grammatical function of so in this sentence, something that has always bothered me is that the word "so" can be used as a pronoun: It looks like rain Responding with: ...
9
votes
4answers
1k views

What part of speech is “worth”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the lexical class of the word 'worth' when used in a sentence like “Is this apple worth $3?” In a sentence like the following: The ...
13
votes
2answers
1k views

Is it true that a word ending in -y is more likely to be an adjective than a noun?

Claim: a word ending in -y is most likely not a noun but an adjective. Don't have my tagged corpus handy to check. Anyone have the stats on Parts-Of-Speech of words ending in y and assuming they ...
11
votes
7answers
1k views

What part of speech is “telling” in “that would be telling”?

In the phrase "that would be telling", what is the word "telling"? I think it would be either an adjective or a verb, but which is it? Neither seems to be obviously wrong. I think the former would ...
10
votes
6answers
28k views

Is “yesterday” a noun?

Are words like "yesterday" and "tomorrow" considered nouns, adjectives, or even adverbs? I'm getting mixed signals from several references. In a case like "I have an important meeting tomorrow," it ...
9
votes
5answers
5k views

How many different parts of speech can the f-word be used as?

In an "interesting" thread of comments we began to look at the word fuck in several different uses. Most of them were interjections and verb uses as would be expected. But, perhaps dialectally, the ...
7
votes
3answers
2k views

What part-of-speech will the new “because” be?

The American Dialect Society has voted because as the Word of the Year owing to its increased use in phrases such as "because happy," "because sad," and "because bored." Since it takes an object, it ...
7
votes
9answers
12k views

What word can fulfill the most parts of speech?

I know there are several parts of speech: Noun Verb Pronoun Adjective Adverb Preposition Conjunction Interjection There might be others as well. Sometimes a word, depending on how it is used, can ...
4
votes
2answers
338 views

What evidence is there that 'to' belongs to any particular part of speech?

What part of speech is to as in: I need to know. To err is human, to forgive divine. What am I to do? This question is not really about the difference in meaning between the examples. It is a ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Postpositions in English and “ago”

I was informed earlier today that the word ago is actually a postposition and the only one of its kind in English. Is this correct? If so, why do dictionaries not use this classification and prefer ...
0
votes
1answer
9k views

How to know what part of speech is “there” in some cases? [closed]

I've been doing some ELA homework and I noticed that 'there' is not always the same POS. It seems to be an adverb, a noun, a pronoun, and several other POS in various contexts. How would one ...
5
votes
7answers
8k views

Is “architect” a verb and a noun?

I hear the word architect used as a verb in the technical field and now more often in other industries and groups, for example: We need to architect a better solution to the problem. I am ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Does “away” serve as an adverb or an adjective in the following sentence?

The shop is five minutes away. According to the dictionary, away is an adverb. An adverb modifies a verb. In the above example, what word does away modify? Why is away not an adjective? ...
1
vote
2answers
991 views

Part of speech: “I am disappointed with”

In a construction such as, "John is disappointed with Alice", what part of speech is disappointed with? It appears to me that the "am" is a linking verb. Similarly, "Jessica is sad", it seems to me ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

English parts of speech — better new treatments

Can anyone please recommend a better treatment of English parts of speech / word classes than that offered by most traditional grammars? Many of the latter stick with the sacrosanct 8 of antiquity, ...
4
votes
4answers
44k views

Part of speech of “very,” “extremely,” “really,” and “quite”

While working on developing the lexicon in one of my constructed languages, I encountered a slight difficulty in using standard classifications for words like very, extremely, really, and quite. To ...
4
votes
1answer
433 views

Is “it is a fun game” correct?

"It is a lot of fun," sounds correct, but not, "it is a fun game." Isn't fun a noun? Then why is it used as an adjective? I have heard this usage even by literary giants, so this cannot be a common ...
3
votes
2answers
806 views

Gerund Phrase as Subject

Is it acceptable to use a gerund phrase as the subject of a sentence? More generally, can a gerund phrase be used interchangeably with other nouns? For example: Understanding history enhances ...
2
votes
3answers
4k views

When is “here” an adverb or a noun?

In the sentence "I hope you are all paying attention, here is a sentence I made earlier", is here an adverb or a noun? I think it is a noun, but if I substitute a noun or a pronoun for here, the ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Is “12:30” (the time of day) an abstract noun?

Nothing else to add, I just want to make sure.
1
vote
1answer
740 views

Is “British” a noun or an adjective in “British PM”?

While reading through this question another occurred to me. If a headline reads British PM says no to inflatable cars. Is British a noun or an adjective? Granted, there are other noun forms of ...
1
vote
2answers
689 views

Is “on” part of a verb phrase in “Put Item on Hold?”

For an interface I'm working on, there's a command available to a user called "Put Item On Hold." Or possibly it should be "Put Item on Hold," since the style guide I'm using says that prepositions ...
0
votes
0answers
53 views

“Me neither” - why oblique case? [duplicate]

I don't like white wine. Me neither. We're talking about subjects here, so naturally the pronoun should be "I". The use of "me" would only make sense to me if "neither" was a postposition. ...
0
votes
1answer
385 views

What is the function of “that” in this sentence?

What is the funcition of "that" in this sentence? The paper notes that conditions in the last warm period in the Atlantic are broadly similar to those observed now. — BBC News, October 7, ...
-2
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2answers
1k views

Grammar of 'over' in 'The accident was already over when we arrived' [closed]

What is the grammar of the word 'over' in the example:'The accident was already over when we arrived' I know it means finished and I think it's an adjective but didn't find the same meaning in the ...