Linguistic categories explaining how words are used. Examples are the verb, the noun, the pronoun, the adjective, the adverb, the preposition, the conjunction, and the interjection.

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38 views

What online resource can I use to find sentences that use a word in a specific part of speech?

I recall there is an online service that lets you search for a word (like "sky") and shows you sentences that use that word but you can filter by part of speech (the noun "sky" vs. the verb "to sky"). ...
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0answers
21 views

“Come home.” — other adverbs which refer to the noun versions of themselves?

In the phrase Come home. the word 'home' is playing the role of adverb, and essentially means 'to or towards home'. It is interesting to me that it has a rather recursive definition; are there ...
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4answers
31k views

“As of late” or “as of lately”?

The title pretty much summarizes my question. For example, in the following sentence She has developed an accent while living overseas, which as of late(ly) became more pronounced. I usually ...
2
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2answers
137 views

Pronunciation of “compact” across English dialects, when used as different parts of speech

Googling suggests that compact has the stress on the last syllable when used as an adjective and on the first syllable when used as a noun. Is this common for all English dialects or are there ...
104
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19answers
21k views

Is “women men girls love meet die” a valid sentence?

Is "women men girls love meet die" a valid sentence? If so, what does it mean? The sentence shows up in academic papers about the "Sausage Machine" for natural language processing. (A google will ...
2
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2answers
635 views

Can a “who” act as both a pronoun and a conjunction at the same time?

Example: I will sue the person who murdered my neighbour. In the preceding example, should we treat who as a relative pronoun, a conjunction, or both?
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5answers
2k views

What part of speech are non-human “interjections” like “oink” and “bang”?

As a spin-off from this comment: If a human exclaims something like "ouch!", I believe it's considered an interjection. But if a pig exclaims "oink!", what is the part of speech? And if a bell goes ...
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1answer
58 views

What part of speech is “touch” in the phrase “sense of touch”? [closed]

Is it just a noun, or is there a more precise name? It seems like an object of the preposition, but I'm not sure.
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1answer
45 views

how can Use the title 'Mr'

Use of titles in English language, can we use title Mr if we use the designation like Secretary Sports Mr Saleem Akhtar, etc, or we skip it. i am asking in reference to make a news report or news ...
0
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1answer
59 views

Expressions starting with 'as' - does 'as' imply a rhetorical obviousness?

Being a non-native speaker I might have the wrong instinct about this, but I feel a common theme in the following expressions: as God is my witness as I hope to be saved as you value your life To ...
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3answers
5k views

Is “of ” necessary in “all of ”?

Listen to all your fans vs Listen to all of  your fans OR Name all the states vs Name all of  the states What part of language is of  in these examples? Is it necessary or ...
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6answers
1k views

How can I prove a word is a noun?

When I read a sentence, I can identify nouns. But now I need to give proof that they are indeed nouns, and that is where it goes wrong. I can think of one or two things sometimes (like combining it ...
3
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2answers
177 views

Telling if a word is a verb in the imperative mood

I'm working on a static analysis tool for the documentation in the Python programming language (PEP257). For this, I need to check if the first word in a documentation string is a verb in the ...
4
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7answers
1k views

What is the difference between a part of speech and a syntactic function / grammatical relation?

What is the difference between a part-of-speech and a function? In other words: What is a part of speech. (e.g. noun) What is a grammatical function. (e.g. head, subject) [read "grammatical ...
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3answers
5k views

When is “here” an adverb or a noun?

In the sentence "I hope you are all paying attention, here is a sentence I made earlier", is here an adverb or a noun? I think it is a noun, but if I substitute a noun or a pronoun for here, the ...
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0answers
29 views

“Data card deposited with Jon Doe.” Is this sentence correct?

"Data card deposited with Jon Doe." Vs "Data card deposited to Jon Doe." which is the correct sentence? Situation is that some device has been returned to the concerned department personnel.
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2answers
178 views

Is there a verb form for 'Logistics'?

Is there a verb form for 'Logistics'? We logistic your growth. Does this sentence make sense in English?
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2answers
2k views

Is 'this this' correct?

The ability to echo words and still make a meaningful statement has always bugged me. Take this example sentence: "Thank you for bringing this issue to my attention. We will take care of this this ...
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0answers
78 views

What is the grammatical function of “in my opinion”?

In phrases such as "X is better than Y in my opinion" what is the grammatical function of the phrase "in my opinion"? I know that prepositional phrases can function as adverbs or adjective depending ...
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8answers
10k views

Is “architect” a verb and a noun?

I hear the word architect used as a verb in the technical field and now more often in other industries and groups, for example: We need to architect a better solution to the problem. I am ...
7
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1answer
170 views

Why does Pinker classify these words as prepositions in *The Sense of Style*?

In his recent book, The Sense of Style, Steven Pinker explains permissible uses of commas and writes this sentence And when the writer pinpoints the coherence relation he has in mind with an ...
2
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3answers
118 views

fun - part of speech [closed]

Compared to other languages, English is in practice pretty indifferent with regards to parts of speech. The lines are often blurry. I'm curious about the following phrase: It's fun. Usually, ...
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2answers
3k views

How do I identify “infinitive clauses/phrases” and “subjects”?

In sentences such as the following, there is (as I understand it) an infinitive clause and an infinitive phrase. Which part is the infinitive clause and which part is the infinitive phrase? And what ...
3
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2answers
79 views

A question about this here adjective

I have already seen these here questions: Can "here" be an adjective? What part of speech does “here” have in “I am here”? but they don't appear to me to answer the question I am about to ...
8
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2answers
2k views

'dynamical' vs. 'dynamic'

The adjective 'dynamical' is widely used in astronomy, perhaps science in general, but it seems like it has the exact same meaning and usage as 'dynamic', and further, seems to be the same part of ...
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5answers
1k views

Parts of speech and functions: “Bob made a book collector happy the other day”

Having been bamboozled by various questions and answers on this site, I'd like to know what are the parts of speech (POS) and grammatical functions of the words and phrases in the following sentence: ...
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1answer
96 views

What kind of noun is “iPhone”? [duplicate]

I've always found it a bit peculiar that Apple's marketing refers to iPhone without an article. There is a question here which discusses why it feels more natural to use an article, but I'm wondering ...
3
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2answers
421 views

Adjectives versus Noun Adjuncts [duplicate]

What determines whether something is a "noun adjunct" or just a garden-variety adjective? Does it matter in any meaningful way? Here is my hypothesis, but I can't find any authoritative source to ...
6
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4answers
897 views

Is this noun used as an adjective?

I read this recently in The Economist: At the end of the summit, the French and European officials had claimed a points victory over the Germans by getting them to agree more firmly to a ...
14
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4answers
706 views

Grammatical role of “the hell”?

I’m wondering exactly which grammatical role the word hell takes on in expressions such as Get the hell out of here the hell in this case seems to modify the phrasal verb to get out (get out ...
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1answer
140 views

Can 'to' in 'to + verb' be an adverb?

The 'to infinitive' has the structure to + verb as in to go, to eat, to ride, etc. The word 'to' is thought to be a preposition. However, since a preposition needs an object and a verb cannot be an ...
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2answers
91 views

Is there a word for “types of nouns”?

I know "parts of speech" is used to mean nouns, adjectives, verbs, etc., but is there a word or phrase for "types of nouns" that would include subject, direct object, indirect object, etc.?
0
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1answer
73 views

Part of Speech, adverb or adjective? [closed]

From a part of Pollyanna written by Elenor Porter: "There ain't no tellin'," sobbed Nancy. "She lay back that white an' still she might easy be dead; but Miss Polly said she wa'n't dead--an' ...
2
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1answer
2k views

What is the defiant “HMPH!” sound called?

What's the name of the sound a child makes after an angry, declarative and usually defiant statement. Parent: John, you can't take a cookie out of the cookie jar. Child: Yes, I can! HMPH!
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2answers
105 views

Subject of 'asking' in: 'sent a letter asking'

In the sentence ... The client sent me a letter asking if we could change the information for them. ... what is the semantic/syntactic subject of the verb asking? Are there any tests we can do ...
0
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2answers
104 views

Part of speech of “that”?

In this sentence: Its shape resembles that of a kangaroo’s hind foot. What part of speech would that be?
6
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5answers
9k views

What part of speech does “here” have in “I am here”?

What part of speech does here have in the following sentence? I am here. I say that in that sentence, here must be an adverb because: It modifies the verb am by describing where I am. Am is a ...
4
votes
3answers
221 views

Are modal verbs and auxiliary verbs actually verbs?

A friend recently told me that "can" is a rare verb without an infinitive. I have since looked it up and discovered it is an auxiliary verb. In my mind it modifies a "proper" verb in much the same way ...
4
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2answers
403 views

What evidence is there that 'to' belongs to any particular part of speech? [closed]

What part of speech is to as in: I need to know. To err is human, to forgive divine. What am I to do? This question is not really about the difference in meaning between the examples. It is a ...
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4answers
156 views

What is the general term that describes subjects and objects? (direct, indirect and prepositional objects)

John gave Jack money with enthusiasm. John is the subject, Jack the indirect object, money the direct object, and enthusiasm a prepositional object. Is there a general term that describes the ...
2
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2answers
1k views

Part of speech: “I am disappointed with”

In a construction such as, "John is disappointed with Alice", what part of speech is disappointed with? It appears to me that the "am" is a linking verb. Similarly, "Jessica is sad", it seems to me ...
1
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1answer
98 views

What’s Up: Adverb vs Preposition

I start with a simple sentence: “I climb the ladder.” This contains a nice transitive verb with a clear direct object. If I slightly modify the sentence: “I climb up the ladder.” I believe that I ...
2
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3answers
70 views

the function of “as” in the following sentence

"But so far, we haven't seen a groundswell of private donations as we often see in major disasters." In the sentence above, is "as" a conjunction or a relative pronoun? I ask this question ...
13
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6answers
2k views

Is “so” a pronoun?

Reminded by What is the grammatical function of so in this sentence, something that has always bothered me is that the word "so" can be used as a pronoun: It looks like rain Responding with: ...
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4answers
254 views

Decomposing “fingerprint”

I somehow ended up in a small argument about the first part of the compound word "fingerprint". The other person insists that the first word "finger" is an adjective, which I cannot agree with. ...
1
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2answers
7k views

What is a difference between “what if” and “if”

My English teacher asked me what's the difference between what if and if last week. I can't search anything about that. What only I know is what if is a question sentence. And if is a general(?) ...
2
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3answers
87 views

Can “those” be used in “those good at writing” or “those who …”?

Can "those" be used in "those good at writing" or "those who ..." to refer to a group of people shared the same attribute described by the phrase after "those"? If it is possible (since I have found ...
6
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5answers
661 views

Why is the word “how” considered an adverb, even if the answer is an adjective?

Consider this question and its related answer: Question: How was the pizza? Answer: It was delicious. The question is asking how, which is defined in every dictionary as an ...
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1answer
339 views

Is the phrase “for one of both of us” grammatically correct?

In portal, Glados at one point says this: "and I thought of a solution that would be the best for one of both of us." I am debating about whether or not the construction of "for one of both of us" is ...
2
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1answer
112 views

What's the name for a part of speech which is not quite rhetorical, but not expected to be answered directly, either?

What's the name for a part of speech which is not quite rhetorical, but not expected to be answered directly, either? I know the word exists, it refers to greetings such as "How are you" and similar. ...