Linguistic categories explaining how words are used. Examples are the verb, the noun, the pronoun, the adjective, the adverb, the preposition, the conjunction, and the interjection.

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2
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0answers
36 views

Are “this” and “next” demonstrative determiners?

In the following, is this a demonstrative determiner: I will go to the store this week. If so, then what class is next in the following: I will go to the store next week. It seems that ...
0
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2answers
10k views

What part of speech is 'there' in this sentence?

What part of speech is there in the sentence "There is a book on the table?" Also, while typing it out, another question pops up vis-a-vis punctuation. In my complete first sentence above, I ended it ...
0
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2answers
35 views

using has to or have to [closed]

I have example of two sentences here He has to write a report.' with he, she,it we will be using has. but why we are using have here instead of has with "She" She doesn't have to wear a uniform ...
2
votes
1answer
73 views

The difference between “parts of speech”, “word classes”, “word categories”?

As a foreign language speaker, I find it hard to distinguish these terms. I've searched on the net; on wikipedia, on grammar.about.com, and some other pages, yet still having difficulties. One just ...
1
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2answers
2k views

What part of speech are the words in the phrase “as well as”?

In the sentence: My car as well as my lap top were stolen last night. What part of speech are the words in the phrase as well as? I believe the first as is the preposition of the phrase, that ...
5
votes
3answers
96 views

Particle or preposition?

I'm studying Spanish and I have some questions about the grammatical parallels in English. Le gustan cocinar y hornear. He likes to cook and (to) bake. When an infinitive is used in ...
0
votes
0answers
42 views

“Me neither” - why oblique case?

I don't like white wine. Me neither. We're talking about subjects here, so naturally the pronoun should be "I". The use of "me" would only make sense to me if "neither" was a postposition. ...
0
votes
3answers
124 views

Can the word 'formatting' be used as a noun?

Can the word formatting be used as a noun like in the following sentence: Consider the formatting of this JavaScript code... Or is it a gerund which should be used without an article: Consider ...
5
votes
5answers
297 views

“Love me tender”: adverb or adjective?

Is the last word in each of these phrases an adverb or an adjective? How can we know? love me tender treat me nice hold me tight
6
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4answers
4k views

What part of speech does “here” have in “I am here”?

What part of speech does here have in the following sentence? I am here. I say that in that sentence, here must be an adverb because: It modifies the verb am by describing where I am. Am is a ...
1
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0answers
26 views

Degree objective [closed]

I want to know the meaning of "degree objective".
2
votes
3answers
2k views

When is “here” an adverb or a noun?

In the sentence "I hope you are all paying attention, here is a sentence I made earlier", is here an adverb or a noun? I think it is a noun, but if I substitute a noun or a pronoun for here, the ...
7
votes
5answers
2k views

How many different parts of speech can the f-word be used as?

In an "interesting" thread of comments we began to look at the word fuck in several different uses. Most of them were interjections and verb uses as would be expected. But, perhaps dialectally, the ...
-1
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2answers
28 views

is it possible making plural of 'conceit'? [closed]

i think, 'conceit' means pride or something like this.then it is an abstract form.but i find a sentence as_their conceits are sometimes not based on wit.
1
vote
1answer
46 views

Is 'overreach' just a verb?

Reading an article on the New York Times website, I came across the verb 'overreach' functioning as a noun. I immediately looked it up on the net and apparently it's just a verb, so I wanted to know ...
0
votes
1answer
80 views

What part of speech is “that” in this phrase?

I know that "that" can function as many different parts of speech, so what part of speech is it in the phrase "the stuff that dreams are made of"?
1
vote
3answers
16k views

What part of speech is “that” in each of the following sentences that mean the same?

It was all planned well before today that I can be sure about. Here I believe that that is subordinating conjunction. It was all planned well before today; I can be sure about that. Here I ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Word to describe the quality of being optional or mandatory

Something like 'Optionality' or 'Ordinality'? (It's similar in kind to the words "Arity" and "Cardinality") Example: "Fred listed the XXXity of each parameter, noting whether it was optional or ...
4
votes
5answers
5k views

Is “architect” a verb and a noun?

I hear the word architect used as a verb in the technical field and now more often in other industries and groups, for example: We need to architect a better solution to the problem. I am ...
3
votes
2answers
138 views

“Now that x, y,” vs. “Now x, y” (“Now” in dependent clauses): British vs. American English

I have noticed that British English speakers tend not to use that after now in certain dependent clauses where American English speakers will almost certainly use it. BE version of two examples: ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

In «In addition to *his being a great writer*,» what is «his being a great writer»?

Is that a gerund-like construction? A noun phrase? What kind of part of speech is that? I apologize in advance if there is some thread that already deals with this issue, but since I don't really know ...
0
votes
1answer
291 views

What part of speech are articles before possessive adjectives?

Today I was diagramming a sentence when I noticed something that confused me. I had a sentence that was basically like this: A parent's greatest concern is rearing his children correctly. ...
0
votes
2answers
19k views

“As of late” or “as of lately”?

The title pretty much summarizes my question. For example, in the following sentence She has developed an accent while living overseas, which as of late(ly) became more pronounced. I usually ...
6
votes
3answers
367 views

What part-of-speech will the new “because” be?

The American Dialect Society has voted because as the Word of the Year owing to its increased use in phrases such as "because happy," "because sad," and "because bored." Since it takes an object, it ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

Is “but” really a conjunction here?

But can be used to introduce an exclamation of surprise. Here's an example from Game of Thrones (not verbatim) But you're a pretty girl! The sentence was supposed to mean roughly My god/Wow, ...
10
votes
6answers
17k views

Is “yesterday” a noun?

Are words like "yesterday" and "tomorrow" considered nouns, adjectives, or even adverbs? I'm getting mixed signals from several references. In a case like "I have an important meeting tomorrow," it ...
7
votes
2answers
391 views

How did 'mad' come to be a determiner?

There's a group of words — I think they're called determiners — used to indicate number in some way... like many, few, most, etc. During a linguistics class my professor said this was a closed group ...
3
votes
3answers
179 views

Does “away” serve as an adverb or an adjective in the following sentence?

The shop is five minutes away. According to the dictionary, away is an adverb. An adverb modifies a verb. In the above example, what word does away modify? Why is away not an adjective? ...
4
votes
2answers
411 views

What part of speech is the word “found” in the sentence below

A whale found dead on the southern Spanish coast was found to have swallowed 17 kg of plastic waste, including plastic bags. I assumed it was a verb, as in a reduced passive form (a whale that was ...
4
votes
2answers
172 views

'dynamical' vs. 'dynamic'

The adjective 'dynamical' is widely used in astronomy, perhaps science in general, but it seems like it has the exact same meaning and usage as 'dynamic', and further, seems to be the same part of ...
-2
votes
1answer
3k views

What part of speech are the words the, a, my, that, your, each, every, etc, or what category do they fall under? [closed]

What part of speech are the a my that your each every etc, or what category do they fall under? The reason I am asking this is that I am programming a sentence generator, and my sentence ...
1
vote
2answers
147 views

Can the verb “intake” be used intransitively? [closed]

Can a combustion engine be said to intake oxygen?
0
votes
1answer
1k views

How to know what part of speech is “there” in some cases? [closed]

I've been doing some ELA homework and I noticed that 'there' is not always the same POS. It seems to be an adverb, a noun, a pronoun, and several other POS in various contexts. How would one ...
0
votes
1answer
85 views

Adverb or adjective?

In this sentence, is "declining" an adverb? Gerund (noun that uses a verb + ing form)? Or adjective? The university's board of trustees, being worried over declining student enrollments and ...
1
vote
2answers
282 views

What part of speech are “plus”, “times”, and “minus”

In mathematics one will often say "This plus that" or "This times that". This means "This added too that" and "This multiplied by that". Multiply, Add, Subtract, Divide - All are verbs. But what part ...
2
votes
1answer
225 views

What is the function of “doing” in “when doing something”?

Can anyone please explain if "doing" in "When doing something" is a base+ing verbal, or a present participle used as a verb in an elliptical sentence, or something else entirely. Here's an example of ...
1
vote
2answers
84 views

Part of speech for non reflexive “oneself”

The words myself, yourself, himself and the like usually function as reflexive pronouns. However, they are also used in context that do not fulfill the common definitions of reflexive. Neither the ...
0
votes
2answers
381 views

What part of speech is “down” in “down went the Titanic”?

Down went the Titanic. What part of speech is down in this context? I have to choose between a) Preposition, b) Noun, c) Verb, and d) Adjective. But I think the correct answer should be "adverb", ...
1
vote
2answers
80 views

How to find words which are related morphologically?

I'm looking for a book, or any other source, which lists words that are morphologically related, like this: imagine verb imagination noun imaginative adjective Or this: medic ...
1
vote
1answer
74 views

Is this “debate” a noun or a verb?

Monday's vote opens the floor to debate on the bill and the Senate is expected to schedule a full vote by week's end.
4
votes
4answers
589 views

Adverbial form of “timely”

The following sentence seems incorrect to me, because the adjective timely is being used as an adverb: Payments not received timely will be returned and additional interest will be due. That ...
-1
votes
1answer
4k views

Is There a Way to Remember Nouns, Verbs & Adjectives [closed]

Is there a simple and concise way to remember nouns, adjectives and verbs aside from poems? I am aware of a number of poems available to aid memory, but I am looking for something a lot more simple. ...
1
vote
1answer
200 views

Diagramming and use of please as interjection

When diagramming the sentence, "Simon, would you please sing now?", should I diagram Simon or you as the subject? Would you be diagrammed as pronoun and please as an interjection? I am trying to help ...
0
votes
1answer
298 views

I am looking forward to …? (followed by a Gerund)?

I know, that I am looking forward to hearing from you. is correct. But I am not sure, if this holds also for other verbs? So is I am looking forward to taste your cookies. or is I ...
1
vote
2answers
601 views

Part of speech: “early” [closed]

What part of speech is early in "I had my lunch early"? Is it an adjective or an adverb?
3
votes
3answers
2k views

What part of speech is “only” in “Fame lights a fuse that leads only to extinguishment”?

My impulse is that it's modifying the verb leads, and is thus an adverb; yet it seems that a case could also be made that it's exerting power on the phrase to extinguishment, a noun, which would make ...
5
votes
3answers
252 views

Female adjective re job title

Why is it common to hear "women writers" or "woman doctor" but not "man author"? Isn't an adjective required in both cases, thus "female guitarist" and "male accountant"? I am asking about why the ...
7
votes
2answers
558 views

What kind of word is “place” in “take place”?

I'm currently analyzing verbs with Stanford CoreNLP and WordNet. I'm interested in particular in verb meanings. I came across sentences like "The scene takes place on the grass." and I found the verb ...
1
vote
1answer
278 views

Is “British” a noun or an adjective in “British PM”?

While reading through this question another occurred to me. If a headline reads British PM says no to inflatable cars. Is British a noun or an adjective? Granted, there are other noun forms of ...
4
votes
4answers
181 views

When to use “not to” and “to not”

I wonder what "structure" should one use, "to not" or "not to"? Is there a difference? is one more accepted? "It's human nature to not do what someone else wants" "Like I needed another reason ...