Linguistic categories explaining how words are used. Examples are the verb, the noun, the pronoun, the adjective, the adverb, the preposition, the conjunction, and the interjection.

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1answer
18 views

Is 'I don't know' an adjective? [on hold]

Other than being an interjection, does 'I don't know' serve as an adjective?
0
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1answer
93 views

Am I right in thinking that I'm using “opposite” as both a noun and an adjective?

I am using the word opposite in two ways: 1) To refer to something that has an opposite; 'heat' is an opposite because it has an opposite, 'cold', whereas 'three' is not an opposite because there is ...
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3answers
254 views

Is the “of” in “a lot of” a preposition?

Is "of" in "a lot of time" a preposition? I am working on a task about the identification of prepositions and their objects. I am not sure about "a lot of", and for some reason it seems unbreakable.
0
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1answer
29 views

If “nice” is an adjective, what kind of word is “niceness”?

Say you have the adjective "nice". If something is nice, then it has the quality of niceness. What type of word is "niceness"? Is it still an adjective?
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1answer
36 views

What is the sentence starter, “as a result”? Is it a transitional word?

What part of speech is "as a result"? Is it transitional or a conjunction or neither.
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3answers
94 views

Collocation 'bolt upright'

What part of speech is the word 'bolt' in the adverb 'bolt upright'?
1
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1answer
31 views

Proper punctuation when using “as is” to make a comparison

I'm wondering what the proper punctuation is when using "as is" to make a comparison. Example: "Venus and Mars are planets, as is Earth when referring to the whole world." I've noticed in this ...
0
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1answer
25 views

What part of speech would these words be considered as?

I am trying to figure out what part of speech the bolded words are: Spanish is spoken in parts of South America and, Football is played in America.
0
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0answers
19 views

compound words and their uses [duplicate]

When using compound words, their mean can still be retained when "de-compounding" them in one of two ways. The first way: bookstore = store of books For this compound word, one just adds an ...
4
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2answers
124 views

Are pronouns nouns?

In the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Huddleston & Pullum 2002) and many other grammars, the English pronouns are viewed as a subcategory of the English nouns. In other grammars, such ...
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1answer
54 views

Proper nouns : Which parts of speech commonly surround proper nouns

I am building an automated system to seek out the proper nouns from a piece of text. I have some algorithms available to me that can correctly determine the POS tag of a word in some text. The problem ...
5
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1answer
97 views

“Bright” Part of speech

"Bright" is listed in the OED as an adjective. However, in front of a color being used as an adjective, it performs as an adverb since adverbs(not adjectives) modify adjectives. Ex. "The bright ...
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2answers
58 views

What is “that” in “The Mouse that Roared”? e.g [closed]

I can't figure out if "that" in this construction is a conjunction, a preposition, or what, and therefore whether it should have an intial cap in headline style.
5
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2answers
74 views

Why do nouns and verbs which are stressed differently all exhibit the same variation?

I recently stumbled upon an interesting quirk regarding words that are both nouns and verbs. They seem to all follow the same stress pattern. Here are a few examples: NOUNS I have a really long ...
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3answers
75 views

What part of speech is 'as' in this sentence?

Science doesn't fare as well for pessimists. They not only have lower levels of happiness compared to optimists, but research shows that people with negative thoughts are 3 times as likely to ...
5
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3answers
3k views

Postpositions in English and “ago”

I was informed earlier today that the word ago is actually a postposition and the only one of its kind in English. Is this correct? If so, why do dictionaries not use this classification and prefer ...
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2answers
51 views

“Where is the cat?” - What part of speech is the word “where”?

In the sentence, "Where is the cat?", what part of speech is the word "where"?
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0answers
56 views

No one made above a B today — adverbial or ellipsis

So as I was watching a movie, there was this sentence: No one made above a B today. It stimulated my curiosity greatly. "Make" is supposed to be a transitive verb in this sentence, and therefore ...
0
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1answer
152 views

Looking for a collection of alternate words - not a thesaurus

I'm looking for a database of alternate words, not like a thesarus, but as they're listed in a dictionary. E.G. not "terrible" => "bad, awful" etc but "terrible" => "terribly". Is there a specific ...
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2answers
53 views

parts of speech the word 'that' can belong to [closed]

Is the THAT in the following sentence a conjunction? There is strong evidence that Zika is spreading fast all over Brazil.
0
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1answer
58 views

Reflexive pronoun: direct object or predicate noun?

In the sentence: He considered himself wise. I would parse this as He - subject considered - transitive verb himself - direct object wise = object complement adjective My kids ask ...
4
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2answers
2k views

What is the grammatical function of “never”?

What is the grammatical function of "never" in the following sentence? You will have to do something you've never done. Is it an adverb? My father disagrees with this. In "I have studied" vs. ...
32
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6answers
3k views

What is the lexical class of the word 'worth' when used in a sentence like “Is this apple worth $3?”

The question "Not worth the paper it's printed on" - wrong meaning? got me thinking about what part of speech, or lexical class, the word 'worth' takes? A comment in "Is it worth ...
1
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2answers
87 views

Is “crazy” a noun?

The traditional grammar taught us that only noun, noun phrase or its equivalent, e.g., to infinitive or gerund (in traditional grammatical sense) could be a subject of a sentence. Now, I watched a ...
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3answers
301 views

What part of speech is “righteous” in this sentence?

I'm wondering about the word class. It does not mean to make righteous just, but to declare or pronounce righteous. As far as I know the word "righteous" or "just" is an adjective. But in the ...
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7answers
289 views

Word for a phrase that is very commonly used to describe something [closed]

What is a word to describe a phrase such as "Anything can happen", which is often made in reference to baseball. This is frequently said, but "platitude" and "cliche" aren't the right terms. What ...
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3answers
2k views

Is “on” part of a verb phrase in “Put Item on Hold?”

For an interface I'm working on, there's a command available to a user called "Put Item On Hold." Or possibly it should be "Put Item on Hold," since the style guide I'm using says that prepositions ...
1
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1answer
42 views

Is it possible for a sentence to have a direct object and predicate adjective?

In school, I was taught that action verbs have direct objects and linking verbs have predicate adjectives or nominatives; however, some verbs seem to use both simultaneously. For example, in "I made ...
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1answer
1k views

In this sentence, what parts of speech are the words 'next' and 'last'?

Could someone please tell me what the word 'next' and 'last' are? I mean the word class. 'it's your turn next ish' 'I read the letters last ish' Thank you!
13
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9answers
1k views

Is “times” really a plural noun?

In the question What part of speech are "plus", "times", and "minus", we discover that plus is a preposition, and are left to assume that so is times, in phrases such as ...
13
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8answers
720 views

“Cry foul” - is foul a noun?

Is the the word "foul" in the saying "cry foul" a noun, an adjective or an adverb? I had a disagreement with my teacher, where I think it's a noun. As in screaming "Foul!", saying that the action is ...
2
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3answers
91 views

Why is the “to” in “we may see the price to rise” is wrong?

My friend is trying to tell me that the use of "to" in the sentence "we may see the price to rise" (meaning "we expect the price to rise" or "we may see the price rise") is correct. I'm fairly certain ...
4
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1answer
60 views

What syntactic function does 'us' have here?

We (subject) need (verb) you (object) to meet (infinitive) us (object?) at the library (prepositional phrase) at 7 (prepositional phrase) tonight (adverb). What type of object is "us"?
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2answers
111 views

What are these “[verb]-ing” forms called? [duplicate]

How would you describe the bolded words here? They don't intuitively seem like present participles to me, but I might be wrong.   List X can be created by appending the contents of List B to ...
4
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2answers
71 views

What part of speech is the phrase “Notwithstanding the foregoing?”

In a contract document I'm reading, I found the following sentence: Notwithstanding the foregoing, your employment is also subject to the following terms: My question concerns the phrase, ...
0
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1answer
63 views

Is there a name for the irregular spelling difference between some nouns and verbs?

Most words that have a noun-form and a verb-form (noun/verb pairs) have identical spelling, e.g. a jump (n.), to jump (v.). However, some words have different spelling: advice (n.), advise (v.) ...
1
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2answers
111 views

Enumeration of different parts of speech

I assume it is bad style but I'm not sure whether it is grammatically incorrect to have an enumeration with different parts of speech (for example a prepositional phrase and an adjective) like: "He ...
0
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2answers
105 views

which is more correct? “of my own age” or “of my same age”

I really faced that problem a lot. So, I want to end these frustrations and make it clear for me in order to improve my English Thanks in advance.
11
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4answers
680 views

Is “now” a “preposition”?

My question starts from this question which asks about difference between currently and right now, which is not that complicated. However, in the middle of exchanging comments, I found a few points ...
14
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3answers
1k views

What is the grammatical function of 'Celsius' in “ten degrees Celsius”?

In this sentence: Iron melts at around 770 degrees Celsius, 1,400 degrees Fahrenheit. What is the grammatical function of the words 'Celsius' and 'Fahrenheit' ?
13
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3answers
15k views

Is “of ” necessary in “all of ”?

Listen to all your fans vs Listen to all of  your fans OR Name all the states vs Name all of  the states What part of language is of  in these examples? Is it necessary or ...
20
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6answers
3k views

How can I prove a word is a noun?

When I read a sentence, I can identify nouns. But now I need to give proof that they are indeed nouns, and that is where it goes wrong. I can think of one or two things sometimes (like combining it ...
0
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1answer
35 views

Graduate or Graduated student [duplicate]

Should I say that I was awarded the Dean's Award for the Best Graduated Student or Deans's Award for the best Graduate? Also, is it "for the best..." or "as the best..." I'm talking about someone who ...
4
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4answers
214 views

Can “Christmas” be used as an adjective?

I was just wondering whether I can write Christmas-colored stockings Christmas can be a modifier like Christmas gift, but can it be used as an adjective?
11
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4answers
1k views

“Employee” in the phrase “employee ID” is a determiner, not an adjective—right?

I am a software developer with a bit of a linguistic slant. We were recently given some training on how to name database fields and were told to avoid adjectives in names. Then we were given an ...
4
votes
3answers
143 views

Is “keep off” considered a phrasal verb, as in “keep off the grass”?

Or is "off" simply a preposition in this case? If it's a phrasal verb, would it still be considered so in the phrase: Keep your hands off her.
9
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2answers
5k views

'dynamical' vs. 'dynamic'

The adjective 'dynamical' is widely used in astronomy, perhaps science in general, but it seems like it has the exact same meaning and usage as 'dynamic', and further, seems to be the same part of ...
1
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2answers
60 views

Part of speech of “that” [closed]

In the phrase: He demonstrated that he was true What word class does that belong to? In general, which word classes can it belong to? For example, relative pronoun, determiner, ... THX
4
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2answers
631 views

What evidence is there that 'to' belongs to any particular part of speech?

Reopen note: There is a quite finite and modest amount of evidence in the literature about this issue, which members can record here as they see fit. Less than there is for example about what a noun ...
5
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2answers
119 views

Is “which” a preposition? Because because

Backstory: Back in 2013 the American Dialect Society appointed because Word of the Year. People had begun using a new syntax: noun-phrases and adjectives could now follow because. In response Geoffrey ...