Linguistic categories explaining how words are used. Examples are the verb, the noun, the pronoun, the adjective, the adverb, the preposition, the conjunction, and the interjection.

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46 views

Proper nouns : Which parts of speech commonly surround proper nouns

I am building an automated system to seek out the proper nouns from a piece of text. I have some algorithms available to me that can correctly determine the POS tag of a word in some text. The problem ...
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1answer
34 views

Is it possible for a sentence to have a direct object and predicate adjective?

In school, I was taught that action verbs have direct objects and linking verbs have predicate adjectives or nominatives; however, some verbs seem to use both simultaneously. For example, in "I made ...
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2answers
81 views

Is the “of” in “a lot of” a preposition?

Is "of" in "a lot of time" a preposition? I am working on a task about the identification of prepositions and their objects. I am not sure about "a lot of", and for some reason it seems unbreakable.
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1answer
1k views

In this sentence, what parts of speech are the words 'next' and 'last'?

Could someone please tell me what the word 'next' and 'last' are? I mean the word class. 'it's your turn next ish' 'I read the letters last ish' Thank you!
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1answer
73 views

Am I right in thinking that I'm using “opposite” as both a noun and an adjective?

I am using the word opposite in two ways: 1) To refer to something that has an opposite; 'heat' is an opposite because it has an opposite, 'cold', whereas 'three' is not an opposite because there is ...
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9answers
1k views

Is “times” really a plural noun?

In the question What part of speech are "plus", "times", and "minus", we discover that plus is a preposition, and are left to assume that so is times, in phrases such as ...
13
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8answers
668 views

“Cry foul” - is foul a noun?

Is the the word "foul" in the saying "cry foul" a noun, an adjective or an adverb? I had a disagreement with my teacher, where I think it's a noun. As in screaming "Foul!", saying that the action is ...
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3answers
82 views

Why is the “to” in “we may see the price to rise” is wrong?

My friend is trying to tell me that the use of "to" in the sentence "we may see the price to rise" (meaning "we expect the price to rise" or "we may see the price rise") is correct. I'm fairly certain ...
4
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1answer
53 views

What syntactic function does 'us' have here?

We (subject) need (verb) you (object) to meet (infinitive) us (object?) at the library (prepositional phrase) at 7 (prepositional phrase) tonight (adverb). What type of object is "us"?
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2answers
80 views

What are these “[verb]-ing” forms called? [duplicate]

How would you describe the bolded words here? They don't intuitively seem like present participles to me, but I might be wrong.   List X can be created by appending the contents of List B to ...
4
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2answers
52 views

What part of speech is the phrase “Notwithstanding the foregoing?”

In a contract document I'm reading, I found the following sentence: Notwithstanding the foregoing, your employment is also subject to the following terms: My question concerns the phrase, ...
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1answer
51 views

Is there a name for the irregular spelling difference between some nouns and verbs?

Most words that have a noun-form and a verb-form (noun/verb pairs) have identical spelling, e.g. a jump (n.), to jump (v.). However, some words have different spelling: advice (n.), advise (v.) ...
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2answers
87 views

Enumeration of different parts of speech

I assume it is bad style but I'm not sure whether it is grammatically incorrect to have an enumeration with different parts of speech (for example a prepositional phrase and an adjective) like: "He ...
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2answers
61 views

which is more correct? “of my own age” or “of my same age”

I really faced that problem a lot. So, I want to end these frustrations and make it clear for me in order to improve my English Thanks in advance.
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2answers
72 views

Collocation 'bolt upright'

What part of speech is the word 'bolt' in the adverb 'bolt upright'?
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4answers
419 views

Is “now” a “preposition”?

My question starts from this question which asks about difference between currently and right now, which is not that complicated. However, in the middle of exchanging comments, I found a few points ...
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3answers
1k views

What is the grammatical function of 'Celsius' in “ten degrees Celsius”?

In this sentence: Iron melts at around 770 degrees Celsius, 1,400 degrees Fahrenheit. What is the grammatical function of the words 'Celsius' and 'Fahrenheit' ?
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3answers
12k views

Is “of ” necessary in “all of ”?

Listen to all your fans vs Listen to all of  your fans OR Name all the states vs Name all of  the states What part of language is of  in these examples? Is it necessary or ...
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6answers
3k views

How can I prove a word is a noun?

When I read a sentence, I can identify nouns. But now I need to give proof that they are indeed nouns, and that is where it goes wrong. I can think of one or two things sometimes (like combining it ...
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1answer
32 views

Graduate or Graduated student [duplicate]

Should I say that I was awarded the Dean's Award for the Best Graduated Student or Deans's Award for the best Graduate? Also, is it "for the best..." or "as the best..." I'm talking about someone who ...
4
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4answers
204 views

Can “Christmas” be used as an adjective?

I was just wondering whether I can write Christmas-colored stockings Christmas can be a modifier like Christmas gift, but can it be used as an adjective?
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4answers
1k views

“Employee” in the phrase “employee ID” is a determiner, not an adjective—right?

I am a software developer with a bit of a linguistic slant. We were recently given some training on how to name database fields and were told to avoid adjectives in names. Then we were given an ...
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3answers
134 views

Is “keep off” considered a phrasal verb, as in “keep off the grass”?

Or is "off" simply a preposition in this case? If it's a phrasal verb, would it still be considered so in the phrase: Keep your hands off her.
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2answers
4k views

'dynamical' vs. 'dynamic'

The adjective 'dynamical' is widely used in astronomy, perhaps science in general, but it seems like it has the exact same meaning and usage as 'dynamic', and further, seems to be the same part of ...
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2answers
55 views

Part of speech of “that” [closed]

In the phrase: He demonstrated that he was true What word class does that belong to? In general, which word classes can it belong to? For example, relative pronoun, determiner, ... THX
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2answers
604 views

What evidence is there that 'to' belongs to any particular part of speech?

Reopen note: There is a quite finite and modest amount of evidence in the literature about this issue, which members can record here as they see fit. Less than there is for example about what a noun ...
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2answers
112 views

Is “which” a preposition? Because because

Backstory: Back in 2013 the American Dialect Society appointed because Word of the Year. People had begun using a new syntax: noun-phrases and adjectives could now follow because. In response Geoffrey ...
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2answers
76 views

Is “Due” a Participle?

The word "due" is a funny little thing.  The etymology is that the Latin debere produced the Anglo-French dever which has the participle form deu.  In effect, English borrows (or has ...
3
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1answer
71 views

What type of word is “certain”?

What type of word is "certain"? As in the sentence: "John wants to own a certain piano which used to belong to a famous pianist." I have looked for some information. It tends to be classified as an ...
4
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1answer
52 views

In “Never speak ill of friends”, what part of speech is 'ill'?

Is ill here a noun, and thus the object of speak; is it an adjective, or an adverb modifying speak?
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1answer
44 views

Why do some words change inflection when used differently?

Are there rules that determine if a word changes inflection depending on its part of speech? Some words seems to change inflection whether a noun or a verb, while others are pronounced the same. I ...
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3answers
182 views

What online resource can I use to find sentences that use a word in a specific part of speech?

I recall there is an online service that lets you search for a word (like "sky") and shows you sentences that use that word but you can filter by part of speech (the noun "sky" vs. the verb "to sky"). ...
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4answers
1k views

Is this noun used as an adjective?

I read this recently in The Economist: At the end of the summit, the French and European officials had claimed a points victory over the Germans by getting them to agree more firmly to a ...
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3answers
712 views

They call me “Tater Salad.” What is the part of speech of “Tater Salad”?

What is the part of speech of "Tater Salad" in the sentence 'They call me "Tater Salad."'? What about "crazy" in "They call me crazy."? For that matter, is "me" the object of the verb "call" in both ...
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1answer
39 views

'Really!' Is it still an adverb?

I understand that 'really' is an adverb when it is describing an adjective in a sentence but what if it was an exclamation as in 'Really! I had no idea that was the case.' What part of speech would it ...
0
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2answers
103 views

Expressions starting with 'as' - does 'as' imply a rhetorical obviousness?

Being a non-native speaker I might have the wrong instinct about this, but I feel a common theme in the following expressions: as God is my witness as I hope to be saved as you value your life To ...
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4answers
4k views

How do I identify “infinitive clauses/phrases” and “subjects”?

In sentences such as the following, there is (as I understand it) an infinitive clause and an infinitive phrase. Which part is the infinitive clause and which part is the infinitive phrase? And what ...
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2answers
3k views

What part of speech is “down” in “Put your pencils down”?

I need to know what down in this specific sentence means. I don't know if it is a preposition or an adverb.
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4answers
3k views

More on 'who should she see': what part of speech is 'should' in this phrase?

Prompted by What does 'should' mean in this sentence?, instead of asking what it means, I'm interested in what part of speech it is. The sentence is: She walked through the forest, and who should ...
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0answers
42 views

What type of prose poetry is this?

When I use the first line as a metaphor/imagery and the second line as its literal translation, as in this oversimplified example: She is my coffeehouse She restores my energy or even ...
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8answers
2k views

What is the difference between a part of speech and a syntactic function / grammatical relation?

What is the difference between a part-of-speech and a function? In other words: What is a part of speech. (e.g. noun) What is a grammatical function. (e.g. head, subject) [read "grammatical ...
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1answer
67 views

What kind of question is this?

When someone asks a question strictly to impart knowledge, as in: Or do you presume on the riches of his kindness and forbearance and patience, not knowing that God’s kindness is meant to lead ...
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4answers
97 views

Part of speech: “each” in “they each gave me a kiss”

Which part of speech is "each" in this sentence? They each gave me a kiss. Some thoughts: The dictionary says "each" can be an adjective, pronoun or adverb. Adverb? That sounds plausible by ...
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2answers
119 views

What part of speech is the word “sleep?” [closed]

What part of speech is the word "sleep" in this sentence? You should have eight hours of sleep each night.
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2answers
4k views

Grammar of “married” in “getting married”

What is the grammar of the word married in this sentence? They are getting married in April.
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3answers
1k views

What parts of speech are in the sentence, “He went to the moon”?

What parts of speech are in this sentence: He went to the moon. I’m confused about part of speech to assign to “to the moon”.
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9answers
14k views

Is “architect” a verb and a noun?

I hear the word architect used as a verb in the technical field and now more often in other industries and groups, for example: We need to architect a better solution to the problem. I am ...
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3answers
179 views

What part of speech is “asleep” in “sound asleep”?

My husband was sound asleep. According to Merriam Webster, the word "sound" in "sound asleep" is an adverb. What part of speech, then, is "asleep"? ("Asleep" can only be an adjective or adverb, and ...
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2answers
2k views

What part of speech is “down” in “down went the Titanic”?

Down went the Titanic. What part of speech is down in this context? I have to choose between a) Preposition, b) Noun, c) Verb, and d) Adjective. But I think the correct answer should be "adverb", ...
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2answers
217 views

Pronunciation of “compact” across English dialects, when used as different parts of speech

Googling suggests that compact has the stress on the last syllable when used as an adjective and on the first syllable when used as a noun. Is this common for all English dialects or are there ...