Linguistic categories explaining how words are used. Examples are the verb, the noun, the pronoun, the adjective, the adverb, the preposition, the conjunction, and the interjection.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

3
votes
2answers
1k views

Correct usage of “in that”

I've heard in that used as a synonym for because, but I don't think that this is semantically correct in all cases. That car is nice, in that it is blue. This sentence generally makes sense to ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Usage of “than”

Buying on margin means borrowing money from a broker to buy more securities than can be purchased with one's own money alone. I was wondering if than in the above example is a conjunction or ...
13
votes
2answers
1k views

Is it true that a word ending in -y is more likely to be an adjective than a noun?

Claim: a word ending in -y is most likely not a noun but an adjective. Don't have my tagged corpus handy to check. Anyone have the stats on Parts-Of-Speech of words ending in y and assuming they ...
9
votes
1answer
641 views

What is the word for using one part of speech where another would be more grammatical?

There's a Greek word that means using the wrong part of speech somewhere in a sentence, as in: I don't know the who or the how or the when. Where "who", "how", and "when" are being used for ...
5
votes
7answers
15k views

What part of speech is “there” when used in “There is (blah blah)”?

What part of speech is there in the sentence “There is a book on the table?” Also, while typing it out, another question pops up vis-à-vis punctuation. In my complete first sentence above, I ended it ...
0
votes
2answers
244 views

Question regarding “does”/“do”

What rule of grammar does this sentence break? (I mean the "does" part of the following sentence) What does the status indicators mean? Also, why does english.stackexchange.com have a code ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

Is there a term for the part of a sentence that is in the form “Customers who …” or “Products that …”?

For the purpose of building a dynamic user interface within an software application I wish to separate parts of a set of phrases which would be in the form of the examples below. Examples: ...
9
votes
2answers
1k views

Do all words have a part of speech?

Do all words have a part of speech? The closest counterexample I can think of is yes. The dictionary says its supposed to be an adverb but it doesn't really strike me as something that modifies a ...
0
votes
4answers
266 views

Is “predicable” a noun or an adjective?

Is it "the policy is a predicable" or "the policy is predicable"?
5
votes
2answers
5k views

The grammatical function of “How”

What is the grammatical function of "how" in this sentence: He told us how to do it.
1
vote
3answers
26k views

“As of late” or “as of lately”?

The title pretty much summarizes my question. For example, in the following sentence She has developed an accent while living overseas, which as of late(ly) became more pronounced. I usually ...
4
votes
4answers
43k views

Part of speech of “very,” “extremely,” “really,” and “quite”

While working on developing the lexicon in one of my constructed languages, I encountered a slight difficulty in using standard classifications for words like very, extremely, really, and quite. To ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

To use “test” as an adjectival noun, is the proper form “test” or “testing”?

When I write a document, I am confused when to use test or testing in my document. For example, which one makes a better statement below? A test engineer vs A testing engineer software test tool vs ...
4
votes
2answers
685 views

How to categorize “grrrr”, “errhh”, “argh”,..?

What are these called in English? Are they same thing as "Gosh" or "Gee"? Maybe sounds of emotional changes?
4
votes
1answer
426 views

Is “it is a fun game” correct?

"It is a lot of fun," sounds correct, but not, "it is a fun game." Isn't fun a noun? Then why is it used as an adjective? I have heard this usage even by literary giants, so this cannot be a common ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

What is the defiant “HMPH!” sound called?

What's the name of the sound a child makes after an angry, declarative and usually defiant statement. Parent: John, you can't take a cookie out of the cookie jar. Child: Yes, I can! HMPH!
2
votes
2answers
2k views

What part of speech is the “be + verb” here? What tense are these sentences in?

I shall have him be killed. She is to be stoned for adultery. What are the constructions be +verb called, grammatically? I feel like the above sentences are very adjectival in nature, more ...
4
votes
5answers
2k views

Can someone help me diagram this sentence?

I'm trying to do a sentence/phrase analysis of the following sentence. I just can't figure out, what would “No matter the season” be (Adv. of ...) in terms of sentence elements. And the next question ...
2
votes
2answers
315 views

What's the grammatical function of “not” and “to” in this sentence?

What's the grammatical function of not and to in this sentence? It is legitimate for Slovenia not to allow the merger. How do I analyse the verb phrase? Allow is the headword, but what are not ...
5
votes
1answer
20k views

Is “is” an auxiliary verb? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is "is" an auxiliary verb? My Mum's bag is blue. Is is an auxillary verb in that sentence? If not, what part of speech is it?
0
votes
3answers
2k views

What part of speech is “turn” in the phrase “it's my turn”? What's its origin?

Hey! It's my turn! This is a very acceptable usage of the word turn. It seems to me that in this sentence, turn is a noun, because it's something that I own. Now, I could be really wrong ...
13
votes
6answers
2k views

Is “so” a pronoun?

Reminded by What is the grammatical function of so in this sentence, something that has always bothered me is that the word "so" can be used as a pronoun: It looks like rain Responding with: ...
4
votes
2answers
8k views

Can the word ‘genius’ be used as an adjective?

Can the word 'genius' be used as an adjective? For example: 'A genius plan' or 'This is a genius piece of work'?
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Can adjectives always be used as nouns when they denote a plural and are preceded by the definite article?

An adjective appears to be used as a noun when denoting an animate plural and preceded by the definite article: 'The successful are those who strive.' 'The foolish are those who ...
8
votes
4answers
2k views

More on 'who should she see': what part of speech is 'should' in this phrase?

Prompted by What does 'should' mean in this sentence?, instead of asking what it means, I'm interested in what part of speech it is. The sentence is: She walked through the forest, and who should ...
29
votes
6answers
3k views

What is the lexical class of the word 'worth' when used in a sentence like “Is this apple worth $3?”

The question "Not worth the paper it's printed on" - wrong meaning? got me thinking about what part of speech, or lexical class, the word 'worth' takes? A comment in "Is it worth ...
4
votes
3answers
700 views

What part of speech is “chiropractic”?

"Chiropractic" sounds like an adjective because of the "ic", but the title "Doctor of Chiropractic" seems like a noun. Am I just confused?
5
votes
6answers
8k views

Is “architect” a verb and a noun?

I hear the word architect used as a verb in the technical field and now more often in other industries and groups, for example: We need to architect a better solution to the problem. I am ...
10
votes
6answers
27k views

Is “yesterday” a noun?

Are words like "yesterday" and "tomorrow" considered nouns, adjectives, or even adverbs? I'm getting mixed signals from several references. In a case like "I have an important meeting tomorrow," it ...
4
votes
2answers
396 views

What is the word “who”?

Is the word "who" an adverb? If not, what is it? If it is an adverb, what type of adverb is it?
8
votes
2answers
467 views

How did 'mad' come to be a determiner?

There's a group of words — I think they're called determiners — used to indicate number in some way... like many, few, most, etc. During a linguistics class my professor said this was a closed group ...
6
votes
3answers
477 views

The verb form of “Is entered in the race”

[I'm not much of an expert in English usage, just an armchair boffin, so I hope I'm not out of line asking what may be a dumb question, to the regulars here...] I am trying to figure out the form of ...
2
votes
3answers
645 views

They call me “Tater Salad.” What is the part of speech of “Tater Salad”?

What is the part of speech of "Tater Salad" in the sentence 'They call me "Tater Salad."'? What about "crazy" in "They call me crazy."? For that matter, is "me" the object of the verb "call" in both ...
3
votes
1answer
595 views

Are both the “special” and the “needs” in “special needs” adjectives?

In the sentence, "she is a special needs child" (referring to someone with a disability), what parts of speech are the words "special needs"? Are both adjectives on their own, or do they only form an ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

Using 'stuck' as a verb

The visual studio kept stucking under RDP yesterday Should 'stuck' become a present tense verb? It seems like "getting stuck" is too long for the modern world where it happens much more ...
17
votes
4answers
7k views

What part of speech is “on” in “on fire”?

A while ago, there was an answer on Jeopardy! along the following lines: In the sentence he was on fire, the word on is this part of speech. The judges ruled that it was a preposition. But I ...
12
votes
4answers
1k views

New Oxford American Dictionary describes “the” as an adjective

When I look at the definition given from the Mac OS X Dictionary (I have set American English as interface language, and the dictionary used is then the New Oxford American Dictionary), I read: ...
11
votes
4answers
718 views

“Employee” in the phrase “employee ID” is a determiner, not an adjective—right?

I am a software developer with a bit of a linguistic slant. We were recently given some training on how to name database fields and were told to avoid adjectives in names. Then we were given an ...