Linguistic categories explaining how words are used. Examples are the verb, the noun, the pronoun, the adjective, the adverb, the preposition, the conjunction, and the interjection.

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61 views

Can “those” be used in “those good at writing” or “those who …”?

Can "those" be used in "those good at writing" or "those who ..." to refer to a group of people shared the same attribute described by the phrase after "those"? If it is possible (since I have found ...
2
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1answer
98 views

Can 'to' in 'to + verb' be an adverb?

The 'to infinitive' has the structure to + verb as in to go, to eat, to ride, etc. The word 'to' is thought to be a preposition. However, since a preposition needs an object and a verb cannot be an ...
2
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1answer
1k views

The difference between “parts of speech”, “word classes”, “word categories”?

As a foreign language speaker, I find it hard to distinguish these terms. I've searched on the net; on wikipedia, on grammar.about.com, and some other pages, yet still having difficulties. One just ...
2
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1answer
574 views

What is the function of “doing” in “when doing something”?

Can anyone please explain if "doing" in "When doing something" is a base+ing verbal, or a present participle used as a verb in an elliptical sentence, or something else entirely. Here's an example of ...
2
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1answer
1k views

How can I identify the role of an infinitive in a sentence?

Infinitives may function as nouns, adjectives or adverbs. Since infinitives are derived from verbs, they do express actions or states of being. However, there is some difficulty in identifying the ...
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3answers
31k views

What part of speech is “that” in each of the following sentences that mean the same?

It was all planned well before today that I can be sure about. Here I believe that that is subordinating conjunction. It was all planned well before today; I can be sure about that. Here I ...
2
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3answers
59 views

the function of “as” in the following sentence

"But so far, we haven't seen a groundswell of private donations as we often see in major disasters." In the sentence above, is "as" a conjunction or a relative pronoun? I ask this question ...
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2answers
58 views

Is there a pre-defined way to describe this grammatical mistake?

I'm wondering if there's a dictionary defined expression for expressions like: "There are many facets to the world in which we live in". One of those "in"s is redundant. But I'm curious if there's a ...
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2answers
2k views

How do I identify “infinitive clauses/phrases” and “subjects”?

In sentences such as the following, there is (as I understand it) an infinitive clause and an infinitive phrase. Which part is the infinitive clause and which part is the infinitive phrase? And what ...
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3answers
4k views

When is “here” an adverb or a noun?

In the sentence "I hope you are all paying attention, here is a sentence I made earlier", is here an adverb or a noun? I think it is a noun, but if I substitute a noun or a pronoun for here, the ...
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2answers
525 views

“sufferings” is plural though it is uncountable,but how?

We know that there is no plural form of the "uncountable noun," but, for example, we write: His sufferings force us to retain pity for him. Is it possible to make an uncountable noun plural? If ...
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2answers
187 views

What is the part of speech for words suffixed with “ity”?

This may be a dumb question, but I am bad at grammar (software engineer). Example: practical becomes practicality, equal becomes equality The dictionary calls them nouns, but nouns are defined as ...
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4answers
2k views

What is the name of the difference between “doesn't” and “don't”?

I came across a phrase like this today, which is obviously incorrect: The car don't run. The correct version of this would be: The car doesn't run. I wanted to explain the issue to ...
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4answers
164 views

Decomposing “fingerprint”

I somehow ended up in a small argument about the first part of the compound word "fingerprint". The other person insists that the first word "finger" is an adjective, which I cannot agree with. ...
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4answers
91 views

What is the general term that describes subjects and objects? (direct, indirect and prepositional objects)

John gave Jack money with enthusiasm. John is the subject, Jack the indirect object, money the direct object, and enthusiasm a prepositional object. Is there a general term that describes the ...
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2answers
143 views

The use of the word “what” [closed]

Which of the two following sentences is or are correct? Excessive logging of forests in the past century has resulted in what becomes known as deforestation. Excessive logging of forests in the past ...
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1answer
603 views

How to identify adjectives [closed]

I’m revisiting/studying about adjectives in “Adjectives” at Capital Community College Guide to Grammar and Writing. First I learn that articles are adjectives, but then there follows a paragraph in ...
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3answers
529 views

Grammatical analysis of “feared drowned”

What is the precise meaning of "feared drowned" in http://www.deccanchronicle.com/channels/nation/south/6-gitam-students-feared-drowned-rushukonda-326. I got the intended meaning, but I am confused ...
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2answers
168 views

Analysing “So amazed he cannot speak” [closed]

In the sentence: "So amazed he cannot speak", is "amazed" an adjective?
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4answers
632 views

Is there a term for the phenomenon where the same word forms more than one part of speech?

Is there a term for e.g. the lexical symbol "duck"? It is both a verb and a noun, in contemporary use having no apparent connection, and so would appear to be represent two words. Then, is the a ...
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2answers
669 views

What part of speech are “plus”, “times”, and “minus”

In mathematics one will often say "This plus that" or "This times that". This means "This added too that" and "This multiplied by that". Multiply, Add, Subtract, Divide - All are verbs. But what part ...
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3answers
207 views

Can the word 'formatting' be used as a noun?

Can the word formatting be used as a noun like in the following sentence: Consider the formatting of this JavaScript code... Or is it a gerund which should be used without an article: Consider ...
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2answers
3k views

Word to describe the quality of being optional or mandatory

Something like 'Optionality' or 'Ordinality'? (It's similar in kind to the words "Arity" and "Cardinality") Example: "Fred listed the XXXity of each parameter, noting whether it was optional or ...
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3answers
26k views

“As of late” or “as of lately”?

The title pretty much summarizes my question. For example, in the following sentence She has developed an accent while living overseas, which as of late(ly) became more pronounced. I usually ...
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3answers
177 views

I'm looking for a word that is the noun-form of “poorly-constructed” and ends with the -ation suffiix

I'm going for some alliteration in a paper I'm writing discussing the history and once-current state of a particular navy, and one of the three things I want to talk about is the possibility of ...
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2answers
1k views

Part of speech: “early” [closed]

What part of speech is early in "I had my lunch early"? Is it an adjective or an adverb?
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1answer
692 views

Is “British” a noun or an adjective in “British PM”?

While reading through this question another occurred to me. If a headline reads British PM says no to inflatable cars. Is British a noun or an adjective? Granted, there are other noun forms of ...
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1answer
173 views

Grammatical role of “kind of” [closed]

I would like to know what the grammatical construct "kind of + v" is? I kind of like cold weather or I kind of eat everything".
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2answers
653 views

Is “on” part of a verb phrase in “Put Item on Hold?”

For an interface I'm working on, there's a command available to a user called "Put Item On Hold." Or possibly it should be "Put Item on Hold," since the style guide I'm using says that prepositions ...
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2answers
4k views

What part of speech are the words in the phrase “as well as”?

In the sentence: My car as well as my lap top were stolen last night. What part of speech are the words in the phrase as well as? I believe the first as is the preposition of the phrase, that ...
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2answers
807 views

What part of speech is 'pooped' in “I am pooped”

I have a wager that 'pooped' in "I am pooped" is not an adjective; however the betting party contends that it is an adjective since "it describes the state of the subject, I". The other party also ...
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1answer
135 views

What are these types of sentences called, and am I missing any?

All the "pluperfect" and "preterit" (sp?) stuff makes my head swim. I have tried to make a list of all the different basic sentence types using a common theme. Could somebody identify the term for ...
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1answer
100 views

In «In addition to *his being a great writer*,» what is «his being a great writer»?

Is that a gerund-like construction? A noun phrase? What kind of part of speech is that? I apologize in advance if there is some thread that already deals with this issue, but since I don't really know ...
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2answers
162 views

Part of speech for non reflexive “oneself”

The words myself, yourself, himself and the like usually function as reflexive pronouns. However, they are also used in context that do not fulfill the common definitions of reflexive. Neither the ...
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2answers
112 views

How to find words which are related morphologically?

I'm looking for a book, or any other source, which lists words that are morphologically related, like this: imagine verb imagination noun imaginative adjective Or this: medic ...
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1answer
123 views

Is this “debate” a noun or a verb?

Monday's vote opens the floor to debate on the bill and the Senate is expected to schedule a full vote by week's end.
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1answer
1k views

what form of grammar is the word “why” used as a pause? [duplicate]

In this sentence: If you're going to take that pie I just baked, why, you've got a lot of nerve. what role does the word "why" take? I know I've heard it in conversational speech enough to know ...
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2answers
943 views

Part of speech: “I am disappointed with”

In a construction such as, "John is disappointed with Alice", what part of speech is disappointed with? It appears to me that the "am" is a linking verb. Similarly, "Jessica is sad", it seems to me ...
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1answer
2k views

Is there a simple word -> noun/verb/pronoun table? [closed]

I'm after a basic list of words and their "role" in language. It could be plain text, excel, csv, but all I want is, eg: cat noun run verb etc. Simple as that. I'm teaching a young friend who's ...
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1answer
36 views

What’s Up: Adverb vs Preposition

I start with a simple sentence: “I climb the ladder.” This contains a nice transitive verb with a clear direct object. If I slightly modify the sentence: “I climb up the ladder.” I believe that I ...
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1answer
79 views

The grammatical parts of speech in 'As ____ as when ___'

What parts of speech are the each of the individual words in as penniless as when. For example when used in the following sentence: They were as penniless as when the little man found them.
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1answer
103 views

What is the word for adjectives like 'correct' which may not provide complete meaning without previous sentence?

While working on my project, I came across this sentence: Obi is correct My question is can we say that 'correct' in the above sentence defines the state of a man, since is is a form of 'be' - ...
1
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1answer
74 views

Is 'overreach' just a verb?

Reading an article on the New York Times website, I came across the verb 'overreach' functioning as a noun. I immediately looked it up on the net and apparently it's just a verb, so I wanted to know ...
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1answer
328 views

Diagramming and use of please as interjection

When diagramming the sentence, "Simon, would you please sing now?", should I diagram Simon or you as the subject? Would you be diagrammed as pronoun and please as an interjection? I am trying to help ...
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3answers
265 views

Grammar–are there any PoS patterns that are incorrect/to be avoided?

I don't know if there are any patterns/rules for "grammatical don'ts" that pertain to Parts of Speech. For the sake of clarity, I refer to things such as: 1) Noun Noun Noun 2) Verb Noun Adverb 3) ...
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1answer
1k views

Usage of “than”

Buying on margin means borrowing money from a broker to buy more securities than can be purchased with one's own money alone. I was wondering if than in the above example is a conjunction or ...
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1answer
52 views

Subject of 'asking' in: 'sent a letter asking'

In the sentence ... The client sent me a letter asking if we could change the information for them. ... what is the semantic/syntactic subject of the verb asking? Are there any tests we can do ...
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2answers
347 views

Can the verb “intake” be used intransitively? [closed]

Can a combustion engine be said to intake oxygen?
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4answers
1k views

Can “Apple” be an adjective? [duplicate]

What role is the word "apple" playing in the sentence "I ate the apple pie." Is apple an adjective? Or are apple and pie treated together as one noun. Is this true of all words used like this? Can ...
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4answers
3k views

What part of speech would “color” be in, “Mercury is the color red”? [closed]

Mercury is red. Mercury is the color red. Red is describing Mercury. What part of speech would color be?