Linguistic categories explaining how words are used. Examples are the verb, the noun, the pronoun, the adjective, the adverb, the preposition, the conjunction, and the interjection.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

2
votes
3answers
268 views

fun - part of speech [closed]

Compared to other languages, English is in practice pretty indifferent with regards to parts of speech. The lines are often blurry. I'm curious about the following phrase: It's fun. Usually, ...
2
votes
2answers
753 views

What's the part of speech of the noun after 'twice'?

He could earn twice his present salary at the new job. Twice two is four. Merriam-Webster says ‘twice’ followed by a noun is an adverb. In this case, is the noun still called a noun or something ...
2
votes
2answers
751 views

Can a “who” act as both a pronoun and a conjunction at the same time?

Example: I will sue the person who murdered my neighbour. In the preceding example, should we treat who as a relative pronoun, a conjunction, or both?
2
votes
2answers
1k views

What does “just between you and me” function as?

We are trying to figure out the parts of speech in the following sentence and have been stumped by the first phrase: Just between you and me, those boots aren't cool this year. I say ...
2
votes
4answers
37k views

“As of late” or “as of lately”?

The title pretty much summarizes my question. For example, in the following sentence She has developed an accent while living overseas, which as of late(ly) became more pronounced. I usually ...
2
votes
3answers
4k views

What are the parts of speech of “at” and “least” in “at least”?

As in “It travels faster than sound at least.” After considering the alternative at the very least, I'm thinking at is a preposition, and least is — well, stumping me. Can we have it be as normal, a ...
2
votes
2answers
523 views

checking parts of speech pattern of this sentence

I wonder if the following sentence is grammatically correct. Foobar is a novel, set in a scenic landscape of farmland and ancient woodland on the banks of the River Foo. I suppose the word "set" ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

What is the defiant “HMPH!” sound called?

What's the name of the sound a child makes after an angry, declarative and usually defiant statement. Parent: John, you can't take a cookie out of the cookie jar. Child: Yes, I can! HMPH!
2
votes
1answer
129 views

What's the name for a part of speech which is not quite rhetorical, but not expected to be answered directly, either?

What's the name for a part of speech which is not quite rhetorical, but not expected to be answered directly, either? I know the word exists, it refers to greetings such as "How are you" and similar. ...
2
votes
2answers
204 views

What is/are the part(s) of “out of” in the phrase “move out of the way”?

In the phrase “move out of the way”, what is the part of speech of the word “out”? of the word “of”?
2
votes
2answers
784 views

'to' / 'rather than' / 'but' [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is correct: “prefer X to Y” or “prefer X over Y”? I prefer walking to taking the bus I prefer walking rather than taking the bus ...
2
votes
3answers
121 views

Can “those” be used in “those good at writing” or “those who …”?

Can "those" be used in "those good at writing" or "those who ..." to refer to a group of people shared the same attribute described by the phrase after "those"? If it is possible (since I have found ...
2
votes
1answer
153 views

“…three years in.” What does it mean when placing 'in' at the end of a sentence?

I read on Gabriel Weinberg's recent blog: "Startups are a long-term game. My best advice is to treat entrepreneurship as a career path, but it is easier said than done absent some amount of ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Is “12:30” (the time of day) an abstract noun?

Nothing else to add, I just want to make sure.
2
votes
2answers
2k views

What part of speech is the “be + verb” here? What tense are these sentences in?

I shall have him be killed. She is to be stoned for adultery. What are the constructions be +verb called, grammatically? I feel like the above sentences are very adjectival in nature, more ...
2
votes
2answers
43 views

Is “unaided” an adjective or an adverb?

The Oxford Learner's Dictionary lists "unaided" as an adjective. You can see it here. However, in two of the examples listed there: Did she produce this work unaided? He can now walk unaided. ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Part of speech: “I am disappointed with”

In a construction such as, "John is disappointed with Alice", what part of speech is disappointed with? It appears to me that the "am" is a linking verb. Similarly, "Jessica is sad", it seems to me ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

What are the parts of speech in “he's fifty years old”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Adjective Pluralization He's a fifty-year-old man. He's fifty years old. I'm fine with the first of these two sentences, in which "fifty-year-old" is a ...
2
votes
2answers
428 views

What's the grammatical function of “not” and “to” in this sentence?

What's the grammatical function of not and to in this sentence? It is legitimate for Slovenia not to allow the merger. How do I analyse the verb phrase? Allow is the headword, but what are not ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

The difference between “parts of speech”, “word classes”, “word categories”?

As a foreign language speaker, I find it hard to distinguish these terms. I've searched on the net; on wikipedia, on grammar.about.com, and some other pages, yet still having difficulties. One just ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the function of “doing” in “when doing something”?

Can anyone please explain if "doing" in "When doing something" is a base+ing verbal, or a present participle used as a verb in an elliptical sentence, or something else entirely. Here's an example of ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

How can I identify the role of an infinitive in a sentence?

Infinitives may function as nouns, adjectives or adverbs. Since infinitives are derived from verbs, they do express actions or states of being. However, there is some difficulty in identifying the ...
2
votes
2answers
184 views

Pronunciation of “compact” across English dialects, when used as different parts of speech

Googling suggests that compact has the stress on the last syllable when used as an adjective and on the first syllable when used as a noun. Is this common for all English dialects or are there ...
2
votes
3answers
93 views

the function of “as” in the following sentence

"But so far, we haven't seen a groundswell of private donations as we often see in major disasters." In the sentence above, is "as" a conjunction or a relative pronoun? I ask this question ...
2
votes
2answers
71 views

Is there a pre-defined way to describe this grammatical mistake?

I'm wondering if there's a dictionary defined expression for expressions like: "There are many facets to the world in which we live in". One of those "in"s is redundant. But I'm curious if there's a ...
2
votes
3answers
6k views

When is “here” an adverb or a noun?

In the sentence "I hope you are all paying attention, here is a sentence I made earlier", is here an adverb or a noun? I think it is a noun, but if I substitute a noun or a pronoun for here, the ...
1
vote
2answers
297 views

What is the part of speech for words suffixed with “ity”?

This may be a dumb question, but I am bad at grammar (software engineer). Example: practical becomes practicality, equal becomes equality The dictionary calls them nouns, but nouns are defined as ...
1
vote
4answers
3k views

What is the name of the difference between “doesn't” and “don't”?

I came across a phrase like this today, which is obviously incorrect: The car don't run. The correct version of this would be: The car doesn't run. I wanted to explain the issue to ...
1
vote
4answers
301 views

Decomposing “fingerprint”

I somehow ended up in a small argument about the first part of the compound word "fingerprint". The other person insists that the first word "finger" is an adjective, which I cannot agree with. ...
1
vote
4answers
233 views

What is the general term that describes subjects and objects? (direct, indirect and prepositional objects)

John gave Jack money with enthusiasm. John is the subject, Jack the indirect object, money the direct object, and enthusiasm a prepositional object. Is there a general term that describes the ...
1
vote
2answers
341 views

The use of the word “what” [closed]

Which of the two following sentences is or are correct? Excessive logging of forests in the past century has resulted in what becomes known as deforestation. Excessive logging of forests in the past ...
1
vote
1answer
772 views

How to identify adjectives [closed]

I’m revisiting/studying about adjectives in “Adjectives” at Capital Community College Guide to Grammar and Writing. First I learn that articles are adjectives, but then there follows a paragraph in ...
1
vote
3answers
707 views

Grammatical analysis of “feared drowned”

What is the precise meaning of "feared drowned" in http://www.deccanchronicle.com/channels/nation/south/6-gitam-students-feared-drowned-rushukonda-326. I got the intended meaning, but I am confused ...
1
vote
2answers
200 views

Analysing “So amazed he cannot speak” [closed]

In the sentence: "So amazed he cannot speak", is "amazed" an adjective?
1
vote
4answers
852 views

Is there a term for the phenomenon where the same word forms more than one part of speech?

Is there a term for e.g. the lexical symbol "duck"? It is both a verb and a noun, in contemporary use having no apparent connection, and so would appear to be represent two words. Then, is the a ...
1
vote
1answer
226 views

What part of speech is “know” in “let us know”? [closed]

What part of speech is "know" in: Let us know. "You" is the implied subject, "let" is the verb, and "us" is the indirect object. But I'm confused about "know" - what is its grammatical ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

What part of speech are “plus”, “times”, and “minus”

In mathematics one will often say "This plus that" or "This times that". This means "This added too that" and "This multiplied by that". Multiply, Add, Subtract, Divide - All are verbs. But what part ...
1
vote
3answers
273 views

Can the word 'formatting' be used as a noun?

Can the word formatting be used as a noun like in the following sentence: Consider the formatting of this JavaScript code... Or is it a gerund which should be used without an article: Consider ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

What part of speech is 'pooped' in “I am pooped”

I have a wager that 'pooped' in "I am pooped" is not an adjective; however the betting party contends that it is an adjective since "it describes the state of the subject, I". The other party also ...
1
vote
3answers
348 views

I'm looking for a word that is the noun-form of “poorly-constructed” and ends with the -ation suffiix

I'm going for some alliteration in a paper I'm writing discussing the history and once-current state of a particular navy, and one of the three things I want to talk about is the possibility of ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Part of speech: “early” [closed]

What part of speech is early in "I had my lunch early"? Is it an adjective or an adverb?
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Is “British” a noun or an adjective in “British PM”?

While reading through this question another occurred to me. If a headline reads British PM says no to inflatable cars. Is British a noun or an adjective? Granted, there are other noun forms of ...
1
vote
1answer
266 views

Grammatical role of “kind of” [closed]

I would like to know what the grammatical construct "kind of + v" is? I kind of like cold weather or I kind of eat everything".
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Is “on” part of a verb phrase in “Put Item on Hold?”

For an interface I'm working on, there's a command available to a user called "Put Item On Hold." Or possibly it should be "Put Item on Hold," since the style guide I'm using says that prepositions ...
1
vote
2answers
6k views

What part of speech are the words in the phrase “as well as”?

In the sentence: My car as well as my lap top were stolen last night. What part of speech are the words in the phrase as well as? I believe the first as is the preposition of the phrase, that ...
1
vote
2answers
8k views

What is a difference between “what if” and “if”

My English teacher asked me what's the difference between what if and if last week. I can't search anything about that. What only I know is what if is a question sentence. And if is a general(?) ...
1
vote
1answer
181 views

Can 'to' in 'to + verb' be an adverb?

The 'to infinitive' has the structure to + verb as in to go, to eat, to ride, etc. The word 'to' is thought to be a preposition. However, since a preposition needs an object and a verb cannot be an ...
1
vote
1answer
374 views

What are these types of sentences called, and am I missing any?

All the "pluperfect" and "preterit" (sp?) stuff makes my head swim. I have tried to make a list of all the different basic sentence types using a common theme. Could somebody identify the term for ...
1
vote
1answer
149 views

In «In addition to *his being a great writer*,» what is «his being a great writer»?

Is that a gerund-like construction? A noun phrase? What kind of part of speech is that? I apologize in advance if there is some thread that already deals with this issue, but since I don't really know ...
1
vote
2answers
662 views

Part of speech for non reflexive “oneself”

The words myself, yourself, himself and the like usually function as reflexive pronouns. However, they are also used in context that do not fulfill the common definitions of reflexive. Neither the ...