Linguistic categories explaining how words are used. Examples are the verb, the noun, the pronoun, the adjective, the adverb, the preposition, the conjunction, and the interjection.

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3
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2answers
681 views

Gerund Phrase as Subject

Is it acceptable to use a gerund phrase as the subject of a sentence? More generally, can a gerund phrase be used interchangeably with other nouns? For example: Understanding history enhances ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

What are the parts of speech in “he's fifty years old”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Adjective Pluralization He's a fifty-year-old man. He's fifty years old. I'm fine with the first of these two sentences, in which "fifty-year-old" is a ...
9
votes
4answers
1k views

What part of speech is “worth”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the lexical class of the word 'worth' when used in a sentence like “Is this apple worth $3?” In a sentence like the following: The ...
2
votes
2answers
462 views

Can a “who” act as both a pronoun and a conjunction at the same time?

Example: I will sue the person who murdered my neighbour. In the above example, should we treat who as a relative pronoun, a conjunction, or both?
6
votes
2answers
2k views

Is “of ” necessary in “all of ”?

Listen to all your fans vs Listen to all of  your fans OR Name all the states vs Name all of  the states What part of language is of  in these examples? Is it necessary or ...
4
votes
1answer
428 views

Most Common Parses of the English language?

I hope I've got the right forum. I want to know about English specifically, although this is a linguistics question. A common task in NLP and Computational Linguistics is to generate parse trees for ...
2
votes
2answers
597 views

'to' / 'rather than' / 'but' [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is correct: “prefer X to Y” or “prefer X over Y”? I prefer walking to taking the bus I prefer walking rather than taking the bus ...
10
votes
1answer
10k views

Yes, no, adverbs, and interjections

There appears to be some disagreement over what function yes and no perform in the following sentences: Yes, you are right. No, you are mistaken. According to ODO (yes, no), they are being used as ...
1
vote
2answers
721 views

What part of speech is 'pooped' in “I am pooped”

I have a wager that 'pooped' in "I am pooped" is not an adjective; however the betting party contends that it is an adjective since "it describes the state of the subject, I". The other party also ...
5
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6answers
414 views

The name of “Scientific American” — two adjectives without a substantive?

Does the name Scientific American consist of two adjectives? What is the substantive?
3
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4answers
587 views

Usage of the word “understatement”

What does it mean when some book says that some algorithm is not so obvious, and then in brackets () says that this is possibly “the biggest understatement in this book”? Is the writer actually ...
1
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2answers
165 views

Analysing “So amazed he cannot speak” [closed]

In the sentence: "So amazed he cannot speak", is "amazed" an adjective?
-2
votes
1answer
801 views

Verb, gerund or participle? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What's the difference between a gerund and a participle? The doctor was talking to the patient. Here 'talking' is used as verb, gerund or participle?
6
votes
1answer
178 views

Is “postchoice” a well-used word?

I came upon the word postchoice in the following sentence of Time magazine’s (May 28) article titled “The optimism bias,” dealing with the benefits of positive thinking: According to social ...
5
votes
3answers
862 views

Can adverbs be also direct objects?

"The irate customer asked for the chef." The irate customer asked something. (Noun phrase?) Since you can fill in something in place of 'for the chef,' does that mean it is a direct object and an ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Is 'this this' correct?

The ability to echo words and still make a meaningful statement has always bugged me. Take this example sentence: "Thank you for bringing this issue to my attention. We will take care of this this ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

English parts of speech — better new treatments

Can anyone please recommend a better treatment of English parts of speech / word classes than that offered by most traditional grammars? Many of the latter stick with the sacrosanct 8 of antiquity, ...
3
votes
4answers
3k views

What part of speech is “back” in “put the book back on the table”?

Put the book back on the table. I'm having trouble. I think it is a preposition.
-1
votes
1answer
161 views

Is “leaning” not a verb? [closed]

Please see the following sentence: Detaching itself from the main body of traffic, a lone auto-rickshaw drew up near Porus, the driver leaning out expectantly. Looking at http://tfd.com/leaning ...
3
votes
3answers
3k views

What part of speech is “only” in “Fame lights a fuse that leads only to extinguishment”?

My impulse is that it's modifying the verb leads, and is thus an adverb; yet it seems that a case could also be made that it's exerting power on the phrase to extinguishment, a noun, which would make ...
4
votes
1answer
242 views

What part of the sentence is “you” in “telling you who that is”?

The object is "who that is", right? And the verb is "telling", but what is "you"? Further sentences: Did they give 'him' a reward? Will you be able to find 'them' a home? I have given 'her' a lot ...
2
votes
2answers
349 views

checking parts of speech pattern of this sentence

I wonder if the following sentence is grammatically correct. Foobar is a novel, set in a scenic landscape of farmland and ancient woodland on the banks of the River Foo. I suppose the word "set" ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Is there a simple word -> noun/verb/pronoun table? [closed]

I'm after a basic list of words and their "role" in language. It could be plain text, excel, csv, but all I want is, eg: cat noun run verb etc. Simple as that. I'm teaching a young friend who's ...
1
vote
4answers
564 views

Is there a term for the phenomenon where the same word forms more than one part of speech?

Is there a term for e.g. the lexical symbol "duck"? It is both a verb and a noun, in contemporary use having no apparent connection, and so would appear to be represent two words. Then, is the a ...
11
votes
1answer
2k views

What form of verb is “thank” in “thank you”?

Is the word thank in Thank you! a verb? If not, what part of speech is it then? If it is a verb, is it in the imperative mood? I'm asking because I've seen someone write Do thank you! which ...
11
votes
4answers
2k views

What part of speech are non-human “interjections” like “oink” and “bang”?

As a spin-off from this comment: If a human exclaims something like "ouch!", I believe it's considered an interjection. But if a pig exclaims "oink!", what is the part of speech? And if a bell goes ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

What does “just between you and me” function as?

We are trying to figure out the parts of speech in the following sentence and have been stumped by the first phrase: Just between you and me, those boots aren't cool this year. I say ...
3
votes
2answers
481 views

What part of speech is “atom” in “hydrogen atom”?

What is the type (adjective, noun, etc.) of the word atom in hydrogen atom? I think that atom here does not qualify hydrogen in any way and we can use it or not, and the meaning of the word hydrogen ...
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vote
4answers
3k views

What part of speech would “color” be in, “Mercury is the color red”? [closed]

Mercury is red. Mercury is the color red. Red is describing Mercury. What part of speech would color be?
4
votes
1answer
136 views

Can “stemwind” be used as a verb?

Further to my question on the suitability of the word, heartland to “shout-out” in today’s New York Times’ article, “The Rough Rider and the Professor,” I have one more question about the usage of the ...
0
votes
1answer
5k views

What is a difference between “what if” and “if”

My English teacher asked me what's the difference between what if and if last week. I can't search anything about that. What only I know is what if is a question sentence. And if is a general(?) ...
6
votes
4answers
7k views

Part of speech for “please” followed by a verb

I know that "please" can be many different parts of speech; interjection, an adverb, or a verb, depending on how it's used. I'm looking specifically to find out what part of speech "please" is when ...
7
votes
9answers
11k views

What word can fulfill the most parts of speech?

I know there are several parts of speech: Noun Verb Pronoun Adjective Adverb Preposition Conjunction Interjection There might be others as well. Sometimes a word, depending on how it is used, can ...
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vote
4answers
2k views

What is the name of the difference between “doesn't” and “don't”?

I came across a phrase like this today, which is obviously incorrect: The car don't run. The correct version of this would be: The car doesn't run. I wanted to explain the issue to ...
1
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3answers
253 views

Grammar–are there any PoS patterns that are incorrect/to be avoided?

I don't know if there are any patterns/rules for "grammatical don'ts" that pertain to Parts of Speech. For the sake of clarity, I refer to things such as: 1) Noun Noun Noun 2) Verb Noun Adverb 3) ...
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votes
2answers
1k views

Grammar of 'over' in 'The accident was already over when we arrived' [closed]

What is the grammar of the word 'over' in the example:'The accident was already over when we arrived' I know it means finished and I think it's an adjective but didn't find the same meaning in the ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

Grammar of “married” in “getting married”

What is the grammar of the word married in this sentence? They are getting married in April.
3
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2answers
1k views

Correct usage of “in that”

I've heard in that used as a synonym for because, but I don't think that this is semantically correct in all cases. That car is nice, in that it is blue. This sentence generally makes sense to ...
1
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1answer
1k views

Usage of “than”

Buying on margin means borrowing money from a broker to buy more securities than can be purchased with one's own money alone. I was wondering if than in the above example is a conjunction or ...
13
votes
2answers
1k views

Is it true that a word ending in -y is more likely to be an adjective than a noun?

Claim: a word ending in -y is most likely not a noun but an adjective. Don't have my tagged corpus handy to check. Anyone have the stats on Parts-Of-Speech of words ending in y and assuming they ...
9
votes
1answer
603 views

What is the word for using one part of speech where another would be more grammatical?

There's a Greek word that means using the wrong part of speech somewhere in a sentence, as in: I don't know the who or the how or the when. Where "who", "how", and "when" are being used for ...
5
votes
7answers
13k views

What part of speech is “there” when used in “There is (blah blah)”?

What part of speech is there in the sentence “There is a book on the table?” Also, while typing it out, another question pops up vis-à-vis punctuation. In my complete first sentence above, I ended it ...
0
votes
2answers
242 views

Question regarding “does”/“do”

What rule of grammar does this sentence break? (I mean the "does" part of the following sentence) What does the status indicators mean? Also, why does english.stackexchange.com have a code ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

Is there a term for the part of a sentence that is in the form “Customers who …” or “Products that …”?

For the purpose of building a dynamic user interface within an software application I wish to separate parts of a set of phrases which would be in the form of the examples below. Examples: ...
9
votes
2answers
1k views

Do all words have a part of speech?

Do all words have a part of speech? The closest counterexample I can think of is yes. The dictionary says its supposed to be an adverb but it doesn't really strike me as something that modifies a ...
0
votes
4answers
261 views

Is “predicable” a noun or an adjective?

Is it "the policy is a predicable" or "the policy is predicable"?
5
votes
2answers
5k views

The grammatical function of “How”

What is the grammatical function of "how" in this sentence: He told us how to do it.
1
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3answers
24k views

“As of late” or “as of lately”?

The title pretty much summarizes my question. For example, in the following sentence She has developed an accent while living overseas, which as of late(ly) became more pronounced. I usually ...
4
votes
4answers
38k views

Part of speech of “very,” “extremely,” “really,” and “quite”

While working on developing the lexicon in one of my constructed languages, I encountered a slight difficulty in using standard classifications for words like very, extremely, really, and quite. To ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

To use “test” as an adjectival noun, is the proper form “test” or “testing”?

When I write a document, I am confused when to use test or testing in my document. For example, which one makes a better statement below? A test engineer vs A testing engineer software test tool vs ...