Linguistic categories explaining how words are used. Examples are the verb, the noun, the pronoun, the adjective, the adverb, the preposition, the conjunction, and the interjection.

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1answer
223 views

What is there in the English corpus beside nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, etc?

As you can see from this NGram, the total number of words in the indexed English corpus that were nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, determinants, pronouns, adpositions, numerals, conjunctions, or ...
4
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2answers
7k views

Can the word ‘genius’ be used as an adjective?

Can the word 'genius' be used as an adjective? For example: 'A genius plan' or 'This is a genius piece of work'?
4
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2answers
501 views

'dynamical' vs. 'dynamic'

The adjective 'dynamical' is widely used in astronomy, perhaps science in general, but it seems like it has the exact same meaning and usage as 'dynamic', and further, seems to be the same part of ...
4
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1answer
317 views

Building a phrase structure of “On the weekend …”

I'm reading Foundations of Statistical Natural Language Processing, and I'm doing one of the early exercises, trying to work out some of the language infliction about the word 'fun'. On the ...
4
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1answer
133 views

Can “stemwind” be used as a verb?

Further to my question on the suitability of the word, heartland to “shout-out” in today’s New York Times’ article, “The Rough Rider and the Professor,” I have one more question about the usage of the ...
4
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2answers
518 views

What part of speech is the word “found” in the sentence below

A whale found dead on the southern Spanish coast was found to have swallowed 17 kg of plastic waste, including plastic bags. I assumed it was a verb, as in a reduced passive form (a whale that was ...
4
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4answers
267 views

When to use “not to” and “to not”

I wonder what "structure" should one use, "to not" or "not to"? Is there a difference? is one more accepted? "It's human nature to not do what someone else wants" "Like I needed another reason ...
4
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1answer
337 views

Identifying the class of this word

I'm reading the Wikipedia page on garden-path sentences. One example is: The government plans to raise taxes were defeated. What class of word is government in this sentence? I read this ...
4
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1answer
417 views

Most Common Parses of the English language?

I hope I've got the right forum. I want to know about English specifically, although this is a linguistics question. A common task in NLP and Computational Linguistics is to generate parse trees for ...
4
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3answers
618 views

What part of speech is “chiropractic”?

"Chiropractic" sounds like an adjective because of the "ic", but the title "Doctor of Chiropractic" seems like a noun. Am I just confused?
4
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0answers
91 views

Are there nouns that embody adjectives+verbs? (Not asking about attributive nouns) [closed]

I'm not sure if there's a better way for me to word my question. I've sorted through "noun" + "adjective" search results here on SE, but found nothing approximating what I'm after. I'm trying to ...
3
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4answers
571 views

Usage of the word “understatement”

What does it mean when some book says that some algorithm is not so obvious, and then in brackets () says that this is possibly “the biggest understatement in this book”? Is the writer actually ...
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4answers
3k views

What part of speech is “back” in “put the book back on the table”?

Put the book back on the table. I'm having trouble. I think it is a preposition.
3
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4answers
1k views

Is there a term for the part of a sentence that is in the form “Customers who …” or “Products that …”?

For the purpose of building a dynamic user interface within an software application I wish to separate parts of a set of phrases which would be in the form of the examples below. Examples: ...
3
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3answers
3k views

What part of speech is “only” in “Fame lights a fuse that leads only to extinguishment”?

My impulse is that it's modifying the verb leads, and is thus an adverb; yet it seems that a case could also be made that it's exerting power on the phrase to extinguishment, a noun, which would make ...
3
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2answers
793 views

What is the grammatical function of “never”?

What is the grammatical function of "never" in the following sentence? You will have to do something you've never done. Is it an adverb? My father disagrees with this. In "I have studied" vs. ...
3
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3answers
1k views

Postpositions in English and “ago”

I was informed earlier today that the word ago is actually a postposition and the only one of its kind in English. Is this correct? If so, why do dictionaries not use this classification and prefer ...
3
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2answers
2k views

To use “test” as an adjectival noun, is the proper form “test” or “testing”?

When I write a document, I am confused when to use test or testing in my document. For example, which one makes a better statement below? A test engineer vs A testing engineer software test tool vs ...
3
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1answer
2k views

Grammar of “married” in “getting married”

What is the grammar of the word married in this sentence? They are getting married in April.
3
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4answers
990 views

Using 'stuck' as a verb

The visual studio kept stucking under RDP yesterday Should 'stuck' become a present tense verb? It seems like "getting stuck" is too long for the modern world where it happens much more ...
3
votes
1answer
190 views

Why is the word “so” in the line, “To a ill-informed person I would have so answer yes,” shown in Italic to stress the word?

I am interested in the word, “so” in the following sentence in Jeffery Archer’s novel, “The Prodigal Daughter.” Florentina Kane who is the chairman of an international hotel empire she succeeded ...
3
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3answers
467 views

Does “away” serve as an adverb or an adjective in the following sentence?

The shop is five minutes away. According to the dictionary, away is an adverb. An adverb modifies a verb. In the above example, what word does away modify? Why is away not an adjective? ...
3
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2answers
468 views

What part of speech is “atom” in “hydrogen atom”?

What is the type (adjective, noun, etc.) of the word atom in hydrogen atom? I think that atom here does not qualify hydrogen in any way and we can use it or not, and the meaning of the word hydrogen ...
3
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2answers
928 views

Correct usage of “in that”

I've heard in that used as a synonym for because, but I don't think that this is semantically correct in all cases. That car is nice, in that it is blue. This sentence generally makes sense to ...
3
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1answer
545 views

Are both the “special” and the “needs” in “special needs” adjectives?

In the sentence, "she is a special needs child" (referring to someone with a disability), what parts of speech are the words "special needs"? Are both adjectives on their own, or do they only form an ...
3
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1answer
1k views

What is the defiant “HMPH!” sound called?

What's the name of the sound a child makes after an angry, declarative and usually defiant statement. Parent: John, you can't take a cookie out of the cookie jar. Child: Yes, I can! HMPH!
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2answers
666 views

Gerund Phrase as Subject

Is it acceptable to use a gerund phrase as the subject of a sentence? More generally, can a gerund phrase be used interchangeably with other nouns? For example: Understanding history enhances ...
3
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1answer
66 views

What is the Specific Type of Word that Includes Stellar, Sylvan, etc

I have recently become fixated on the idea of words which are defined as "of, or relating to, [noun]"- stellar means "of stars", sylvan means "of trees". These are the only two samples that I have ...
3
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1answer
74 views

What is the part of speech of a word that refers to the word itself

If I say: Some words that I like are: "desk", "lovely", and "enticingly". What parts of speech are the quoted words? Used in a typical sentence they'd be: noun, adjective, and adverb ...
3
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2answers
159 views

“Now that x, y,” vs. “Now x, y” (“Now” in dependent clauses): British vs. American English

I have noticed that British English speakers tend not to use that after now in certain dependent clauses where American English speakers will almost certainly use it. BE version of two examples: ...
3
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4answers
908 views

Is “messaging” a noun, a verb, or an adjective?

In the cruel jargon of software, it is common to see the phrase "messaging system", as if "messaging" were an adjective. Yet if I am "brushing" my teeth, it's a verb. There is an act of "brushing", ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Is 'this this' correct?

The ability to echo words and still make a meaningful statement has always bugged me. Take this example sentence: "Thank you for bringing this issue to my attention. We will take care of this this ...
2
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3answers
617 views

They call me “Tater Salad.” What is the part of speech of “Tater Salad”?

What is the part of speech of "Tater Salad" in the sentence 'They call me "Tater Salad."'? What about "crazy" in "They call me crazy."? For that matter, is "me" the object of the verb "call" in both ...
2
votes
2answers
454 views

What's the part of speech of the noun after 'twice'?

He could earn twice his present salary at the new job. Twice two is four. Merriam-Webster says ‘twice’ followed by a noun is an adverb. In this case, is the noun still called a noun or something ...
2
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2answers
430 views

Can a “who” act as both a pronoun and a conjunction at the same time?

Example: I will sue the person who murdered my neighbour. In the above example, should we treat who as a relative pronoun, a conjunction, or both?
2
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2answers
1k views

What does “just between you and me” function as?

We are trying to figure out the parts of speech in the following sentence and have been stumped by the first phrase: Just between you and me, those boots aren't cool this year. I say ...
2
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2answers
324 views

checking parts of speech pattern of this sentence

I wonder if the following sentence is grammatically correct. Foobar is a novel, set in a scenic landscape of farmland and ancient woodland on the banks of the River Foo. I suppose the word "set" ...
2
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2answers
3k views

What are the parts of speech of “at” and “least” in “at least”?

As in “It travels faster than sound at least.” After considering the alternative at the very least, I'm thinking at is a preposition, and least is — well, stumping me. Can we have it be as normal, a ...
2
votes
2answers
577 views

'to' / 'rather than' / 'but' [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is correct: “prefer X to Y” or “prefer X over Y”? I prefer walking to taking the bus I prefer walking rather than taking the bus ...
2
votes
1answer
136 views

“…three years in.” What does it mean when placing 'in' at the end of a sentence?

I read on Gabriel Weinberg's recent blog: "Startups are a long-term game. My best advice is to treat entrepreneurship as a career path, but it is easier said than done absent some amount of ...
2
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2answers
2k views

What part of speech is the “be + verb” here? What tense are these sentences in?

I shall have him be killed. She is to be stoned for adultery. What are the constructions be +verb called, grammatically? I feel like the above sentences are very adjectival in nature, more ...
2
votes
2answers
102 views

What is/are the part(s) of “out of” in the phrase “move out of the way”?

In the phrase “move out of the way”, what is the part of speech of the word “out”? of the word “of”?
2
votes
1answer
1k views

What are the parts of speech in “he's fifty years old”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Adjective Pluralization He's a fifty-year-old man. He's fifty years old. I'm fine with the first of these two sentences, in which "fifty-year-old" is a ...
2
votes
2answers
286 views

What's the grammatical function of “not” and “to” in this sentence?

What's the grammatical function of not and to in this sentence? It is legitimate for Slovenia not to allow the merger. How do I analyse the verb phrase? Allow is the headword, but what are not ...
2
votes
1answer
659 views

The difference between “parts of speech”, “word classes”, “word categories”?

As a foreign language speaker, I find it hard to distinguish these terms. I've searched on the net; on wikipedia, on grammar.about.com, and some other pages, yet still having difficulties. One just ...
2
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1answer
384 views

What is the function of “doing” in “when doing something”?

Can anyone please explain if "doing" in "When doing something" is a base+ing verbal, or a present participle used as a verb in an elliptical sentence, or something else entirely. Here's an example of ...
2
votes
1answer
961 views

How can I identify the role of an infinitive in a sentence?

Infinitives may function as nouns, adjectives or adverbs. Since infinitives are derived from verbs, they do express actions or states of being. However, there is some difficulty in identifying the ...
2
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3answers
23k views

What part of speech is “that” in each of the following sentences that mean the same?

It was all planned well before today that I can be sure about. Here I believe that that is subordinating conjunction. It was all planned well before today; I can be sure about that. Here I ...
2
votes
3answers
3k views

When is “here” an adverb or a noun?

In the sentence "I hope you are all paying attention, here is a sentence I made earlier", is here an adverb or a noun? I think it is a noun, but if I substitute a noun or a pronoun for here, the ...
1
vote
2answers
463 views

“sufferings” is plural though it is uncountable,but how?

We know that there is no plural form of the "uncountable noun," but, for example, we write: His sufferings force us to retain pity for him. Is it possible to make an uncountable noun plural? If ...