Linguistic categories explaining how words are used. Examples are the verb, the noun, the pronoun, the adjective, the adverb, the preposition, the conjunction, and the interjection.

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2answers
775 views

Part of speech: “early” [closed]

What part of speech is early in "I had my lunch early"? Is it an adjective or an adverb?
7
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2answers
666 views

What kind of word is “place” in “take place”?

I'm currently analyzing verbs with Stanford CoreNLP and WordNet. I'm interested in particular in verb meanings. I came across sentences like "The scene takes place on the grass." and I found the verb ...
1
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1answer
395 views

Is “British” a noun or an adjective in “British PM”?

While reading through this question another occurred to me. If a headline reads British PM says no to inflatable cars. Is British a noun or an adjective? Granted, there are other noun forms of ...
4
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4answers
247 views

When to use “not to” and “to not”

I wonder what "structure" should one use, "to not" or "not to"? Is there a difference? is one more accepted? "It's human nature to not do what someone else wants" "Like I needed another reason ...
1
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4answers
845 views

Can “Apple” be an adjective? [duplicate]

What role is the word "apple" playing in the sentence "I ate the apple pie." Is apple an adjective? Or are apple and pie treated together as one noun. Is this true of all words used like this? Can ...
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1answer
146 views

Grammatical role of “kind of” [closed]

I would like to know what the grammatical construct "kind of + v" is? I kind of like cold weather or I kind of eat everything".
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1answer
904 views

How can I identify the role of an infinitive in a sentence?

Infinitives may function as nouns, adjectives or adverbs. Since infinitives are derived from verbs, they do express actions or states of being. However, there is some difficulty in identifying the ...
5
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3answers
260 views

Female adjective re job title

Why is it common to hear "women writers" or "woman doctor" but not "man author"? Isn't an adjective required in both cases, thus "female guitarist" and "male accountant"? I am asking about why the ...
1
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1answer
505 views

what form of grammar is the word “why” used as a pause? [duplicate]

In this sentence: If you're going to take that pie I just baked, why, you've got a lot of nerve. what role does the word "why" take? I know I've heard it in conversational speech enough to know ...
5
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3answers
175 views

Origin of “City of …”, “County of …”, “Town of …”

I'm curious about the numerous civic names (at least in Canada) which are in the 'of' form, by which I mean: City of Toronto, County of Wellington, etc. To me, this form sounds antiquated. I can ...
2
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1answer
132 views

“…three years in.” What does it mean when placing 'in' at the end of a sentence?

I read on Gabriel Weinberg's recent blog: "Startups are a long-term game. My best advice is to treat entrepreneurship as a career path, but it is easier said than done absent some amount of ...
0
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1answer
222 views

What is the function of “that” in this sentence?

What is the funcition of "that" in this sentence? The paper notes that conditions in the last warm period in the Atlantic are broadly similar to those observed now. — BBC News, October 7, ...
4
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1answer
218 views

What is there in the English corpus beside nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, etc?

As you can see from this NGram, the total number of words in the indexed English corpus that were nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, determinants, pronouns, adpositions, numerals, conjunctions, or ...
4
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1answer
327 views

Identifying the class of this word

I'm reading the Wikipedia page on garden-path sentences. One example is: The government plans to raise taxes were defeated. What class of word is government in this sentence? I read this ...
1
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1answer
652 views

Part of speech: “I am disappointed with”

In a construction such as, "John is disappointed with Alice", what part of speech is disappointed with? It appears to me that the "am" is a linking verb. Similarly, "Jessica is sad", it seems to me ...
2
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3answers
21k views

What part of speech is “that” in each of the following sentences that mean the same?

It was all planned well before today that I can be sure about. Here I believe that that is subordinating conjunction. It was all planned well before today; I can be sure about that. Here I ...
2
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3answers
3k views

When is “here” an adverb or a noun?

In the sentence "I hope you are all paying attention, here is a sentence I made earlier", is here an adverb or a noun? I think it is a noun, but if I substitute a noun or a pronoun for here, the ...
0
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2answers
142 views

Part of speech of “clean” in “burn the prophet clean”

Please guide me for the part of speech of clean here in this extract: He had schooled him in the evils that befall prophets; in those that come from the world, which are trifling, and those that ...
4
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3answers
661 views

What part of speech is “methinks”?

Dictionaries call this word a verb, but it doesn't seem to behave like any other verb in the English language. Another question on this site calls it a “conjoined pronoun-verb combination”, which ...
6
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4answers
5k views

What part of speech does “here” have in “I am here”?

What part of speech does here have in the following sentence? I am here. I say that in that sentence, here must be an adverb because: It modifies the verb am by describing where I am. Am is a ...
0
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1answer
513 views

What are the possible part of speech combinations for compound nouns?

I am currently working through allowable part of speech combinations for the first two words of an English sentence. It seems troubling to me to allow the first two words of a sentence to both be ...
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2answers
2k views

Word to describe the quality of being optional or mandatory

Something like 'Optionality' or 'Ordinality'? (It's similar in kind to the words "Arity" and "Cardinality") Example: "Fred listed the XXXity of each parameter, noting whether it was optional or ...
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1answer
148 views

What part of speech is “(noun) the (noun)”? [closed]

What part of speech is the part boldfaced in these sentences? Chell the protagonist of Portal is a woman. Ludwig Wittgenstein the Austrian-British philosopher worked primarily in logic. Tim ...
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1answer
221 views

Interpretation of 'have' as stative or dynamic

Please bear with me. It's been a long time since I looked up grammatical concepts. The sentence is: I can quite clearly see the bewildered looks you will be having on your faces on reading this. ...
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2answers
118 views

Usage of the article 'a' before bait in this particular instance

Is it acceptable to use the article 'a' before 'bait' in this sentence? Is there a difference in meaning here when you use 'a' or drop it? "You would not have sent it to me for no reason. It was a ...
2
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2answers
102 views

What is/are the part(s) of “out of” in the phrase “move out of the way”?

In the phrase “move out of the way”, what is the part of speech of the word “out”? of the word “of”?
2
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2answers
2k views

What are the parts of speech of “at” and “least” in “at least”?

As in “It travels faster than sound at least.” After considering the alternative at the very least, I'm thinking at is a preposition, and least is — well, stumping me. Can we have it be as normal, a ...
3
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4answers
862 views

Is “messaging” a noun, a verb, or an adjective?

In the cruel jargon of software, it is common to see the phrase "messaging system", as if "messaging" were an adjective. Yet if I am "brushing" my teeth, it's a verb. There is an act of "brushing", ...
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1answer
104 views

“Bongo is screaming”: is “screaming” an adjective? [closed]

If I say, "Bongo is screaming", would screaming be an adjective?
4
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4answers
696 views

Adverbial form of “timely”

The following sentence seems incorrect to me, because the adjective timely is being used as an adverb: Payments not received timely will be returned and additional interest will be due. That ...
2
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2answers
435 views

What's the part of speech of the noun after 'twice'?

He could earn twice his present salary at the new job. Twice two is four. Merriam-Webster says ‘twice’ followed by a noun is an adverb. In this case, is the noun still called a noun or something ...
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2answers
506 views

Is “on” part of a verb phrase in “Put Item on Hold?”

For an interface I'm working on, there's a command available to a user called "Put Item On Hold." Or possibly it should be "Put Item on Hold," since the style guide I'm using says that prepositions ...
4
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1answer
304 views

Building a phrase structure of “On the weekend …”

I'm reading Foundations of Statistical Natural Language Processing, and I'm doing one of the early exercises, trying to work out some of the language infliction about the word 'fun'. On the ...
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2answers
3k views

What part of speech are the words in the phrase “as well as”?

In the sentence: My car as well as my lap top were stolen last night. What part of speech are the words in the phrase as well as? I believe the first as is the preposition of the phrase, that ...
3
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2answers
746 views

What is the grammatical function of “never”?

What is the grammatical function of "never" in the following sentence? You will have to do something you've never done. Is it an adverb? My father disagrees with this. In "I have studied" vs. ...
1
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1answer
578 views

How to identify adjectives [closed]

I’m revisiting/studying about adjectives in “Adjectives” at Capital Community College Guide to Grammar and Writing. First I learn that articles are adjectives, but then there follows a paragraph in ...
3
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3answers
1k views

Postpositions in English and “ago”

I was informed earlier today that the word ago is actually a postposition and the only one of its kind in English. Is this correct? If so, why do dictionaries not use this classification and prefer ...
6
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3answers
621 views

Is this noun used as an adjective?

I read this recently in The Economist: At the end of the summit, the French and European officials had claimed a points victory over the Germans by getting them to agree more firmly to a ...
6
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1answer
906 views

Adverb vs. direct object [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What exactly is an “adverb”? Consider the following sentences: She went home. He swam yesterday. Are the words "home" and "yesterday" adverbs or direct ...
1
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3answers
464 views

Grammatical analysis of “feared drowned”

What is the precise meaning of "feared drowned" in http://www.deccanchronicle.com/channels/nation/south/6-gitam-students-feared-drowned-rushukonda-326. I got the intended meaning, but I am confused ...
3
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2answers
656 views

Gerund Phrase as Subject

Is it acceptable to use a gerund phrase as the subject of a sentence? More generally, can a gerund phrase be used interchangeably with other nouns? For example: Understanding history enhances ...
2
votes
1answer
996 views

What are the parts of speech in “he's fifty years old”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Adjective Pluralization He's a fifty-year-old man. He's fifty years old. I'm fine with the first of these two sentences, in which "fifty-year-old" is a ...
9
votes
4answers
929 views

What part of speech is “worth”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the lexical class of the word 'worth' when used in a sentence like “Is this apple worth $3?” In a sentence like the following: The ...
2
votes
2answers
411 views

Can a “who” act as both a pronoun and a conjunction at the same time?

Example: I will sue the person who murdered my neighbour. In the above example, should we treat who as a relative pronoun, a conjunction, or both?
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Is “of ” necessary in “all of ”?

Listen to all your fans vs Listen to all of  your fans OR Name all the states vs Name all of  the states What part of language is of  in these examples? Is it necessary or ...
4
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1answer
411 views

Most Common Parses of the English language?

I hope I've got the right forum. I want to know about English specifically, although this is a linguistics question. A common task in NLP and Computational Linguistics is to generate parse trees for ...
2
votes
2answers
554 views

'to' / 'rather than' / 'but' [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is correct: “prefer X to Y” or “prefer X over Y”? I prefer walking to taking the bus I prefer walking rather than taking the bus ...
10
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1answer
8k views

Yes, no, adverbs, and interjections

There appears to be some disagreement over what function yes and no perform in the following sentences: Yes, you are right. No, you are mistaken. According to ODO (yes, no), they are being used as ...
1
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2answers
653 views

What part of speech is 'pooped' in “I am pooped”

I have a wager that 'pooped' in "I am pooped" is not an adjective; however the betting party contends that it is an adjective since "it describes the state of the subject, I". The other party also ...
4
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6answers
400 views

The name of “Scientific American” — two adjectives without a substantive?

Does the name Scientific American consist of two adjectives? What is the substantive?