Linguistic categories explaining how words are used. Examples are the verb, the noun, the pronoun, the adjective, the adverb, the preposition, the conjunction, and the interjection.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

0
votes
1answer
37 views

Graduate or Graduated student [duplicate]

Should I say that I was awarded the Dean's Award for the Best Graduated Student or Deans's Award for the best Graduate? Also, is it "for the best..." or "as the best..." I'm talking about someone who ...
4
votes
1answer
82 views

In “Never speak ill of friends”, what part of speech is 'ill'?

Is ill here a noun, and thus the object of speak; is it an adjective, or an adverb modifying speak?
1
vote
1answer
76 views

Why do some words change inflection when used differently?

Are there rules that determine if a word changes inflection depending on its part of speech? Some words seems to change inflection whether a noun or a verb, while others are pronounced the same. I ...
1
vote
3answers
463 views

Is the “of” in “a lot of” a preposition?

Is "of" in "a lot of time" a preposition? I am working on a task about the identification of prepositions and their objects. I am not sure about "a lot of", and for some reason it seems unbreakable.
0
votes
1answer
111 views

Am I right in thinking that I'm using “opposite” as both a noun and an adjective?

I am using the word opposite in two ways: 1) To refer to something that has an opposite; 'heat' is an opposite because it has an opposite, 'cold', whereas 'three' is not an opposite because there is ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

'Really!' Is it still an adverb?

I understand that 'really' is an adverb when it is describing an adjective in a sentence but what if it was an exclamation as in 'Really! I had no idea that was the case.' What part of speech would it ...
24
votes
2answers
4k views

What part of speech is “down” in “Put your pencils down”?

I need to know what down in this specific sentence means. I don't know if it is a preposition or an adverb.
0
votes
0answers
45 views

What type of prose poetry is this?

When I use the first line as a metaphor/imagery and the second line as its literal translation, as in this oversimplified example: She is my coffeehouse She restores my energy or even ...
1
vote
1answer
146 views

What kind of question is this?

When someone asks a question strictly to impart knowledge, as in: Or do you presume on the riches of his kindness and forbearance and patience, not knowing that God’s kindness is meant to lead ...
1
vote
4answers
107 views

Part of speech: “each” in “they each gave me a kiss”

Which part of speech is "each" in this sentence? They each gave me a kiss. Some thoughts: The dictionary says "each" can be an adjective, pronoun or adverb. Adverb? That sounds plausible by ...
0
votes
2answers
217 views

What part of speech is the word “sleep?” [closed]

What part of speech is the word "sleep" in this sentence? You should have eight hours of sleep each night.
0
votes
3answers
306 views

What part of speech is “asleep” in “sound asleep”?

My husband was sound asleep. According to Merriam Webster, the word "sound" in "sound asleep" is an adverb. What part of speech, then, is "asleep"? ("Asleep" can only be an adjective or adverb, and ...
0
votes
1answer
123 views

What part of speech is “Commemorates”?

I know that "Commemorate" is a verb, but what part of speech is "Commemorates"? (What part of speech is it when you add the 's' to the end?)
1
vote
0answers
94 views

What part of speech is “on” in the phrase “Bring it on home (to me)”?

If I had to guess I'd say it's an adverb, modifying the verb "bring," but it seems like it could also be interpreted as a preposition with "home" as the object. Both? Neither? Thanks for any help.
1
vote
2answers
1k views

her: a determiner or a pronoun?

Her has two forms: Possessive form of 'she': This is her pen; She is her mother Object form of 'she': Give it to her; I know her For simplicity, please let me refer to the first form of her as ...
2
votes
2answers
85 views

Is “unaided” an adjective or an adverb?

The Oxford Learner's Dictionary lists "unaided" as an adjective. You can see it here. However, in two of the examples listed there: Did she produce this work unaided? He can now walk unaided. Isn'...
5
votes
2answers
98 views

What the heck is “not”, anyway?

Consider the following sentences: Enough are present to form a quorum. Not enough are present to form a quorum. M-W and Wiktionary both label enough as a pronoun in this usage, but they also ...
5
votes
1answer
83 views

What is the name of the phrase that repeats the preceding noun?

I, Motes, don't know this. "Motes" is? I think it starts with an 'A'.
1
vote
1answer
2k views

What part of speech is “know” in “let us know”? [closed]

What part of speech is "know" in: Let us know. "You" is the implied subject, "let" is the verb, and "us" is the indirect object. But I'm confused about "know" - what is its grammatical ...
0
votes
0answers
41 views

“Come home.” — other adverbs which refer to the noun versions of themselves?

In the phrase Come home. the word 'home' is playing the role of adverb, and essentially means 'to or towards home'. It is interesting to me that it has a rather recursive definition; are there ...
110
votes
19answers
23k views

Is “women men girls love meet die” a valid sentence?

Is "women men girls love meet die" a valid sentence? If so, what does it mean? The sentence shows up in academic papers about the "Sausage Machine" for natural language processing. (A google will ...
1
vote
1answer
114 views

how can Use the title 'Mr'

Use of titles in English language, can we use title Mr if we use the designation like Secretary Sports Mr Saleem Akhtar, etc, or we skip it. i am asking in reference to make a news report or news ...
-1
votes
1answer
217 views

What part of speech is “touch” in the phrase “sense of touch”? [closed]

Is it just a noun, or is there a more precise name? It seems like an object of the preposition, but I'm not sure.
1
vote
3answers
212 views

What online resource can I use to find sentences that use a word in a specific part of speech?

I recall there is an online service that lets you search for a word (like "sky") and shows you sentences that use that word but you can filter by part of speech (the noun "sky" vs. the verb "to sky"). ...
0
votes
2answers
121 views

Expressions starting with 'as' - does 'as' imply a rhetorical obviousness?

Being a non-native speaker I might have the wrong instinct about this, but I feel a common theme in the following expressions: as God is my witness as I hope to be saved as you value your life To ...
20
votes
6answers
3k views

How can I prove a word is a noun?

When I read a sentence, I can identify nouns. But now I need to give proof that they are indeed nouns, and that is where it goes wrong. I can think of one or two things sometimes (like combining it ...
0
votes
0answers
120 views

“Data card deposited with Jon Doe.” Is this sentence correct?

"Data card deposited with Jon Doe." Vs "Data card deposited to Jon Doe." which is the correct sentence? Situation is that some device has been returned to the concerned department personnel.
0
votes
0answers
354 views

What is the grammatical function of “in my opinion”?

In phrases such as "X is better than Y in my opinion" what is the grammatical function of the phrase "in my opinion"? I know that prepositional phrases can function as adverbs or adjective depending ...
0
votes
2answers
933 views

Is there a verb form for 'Logistics'?

Is there a verb form for 'Logistics'? We logistic your growth. Does this sentence make sense in English?
8
votes
1answer
2k views

Why does Pinker classify these words as prepositions in *The Sense of Style*?

In his recent book, The Sense of Style, Steven Pinker explains permissible uses of commas and writes this sentence And when the writer pinpoints the coherence relation he has in mind with an ...
2
votes
3answers
745 views

fun - part of speech [closed]

Compared to other languages, English is in practice pretty indifferent with regards to parts of speech. The lines are often blurry. I'm curious about the following phrase: It's fun. Usually, I'...
3
votes
2answers
237 views

A question about this here adjective

I have already seen these here questions: Can "here" be an adjective? What part of speech does “here” have in “I am here”? but they don't appear to me to answer the question I am about to ...
0
votes
1answer
157 views

Looking for a collection of alternate words - not a thesaurus

I'm looking for a database of alternate words, not like a thesarus, but as they're listed in a dictionary. E.G. not "terrible" => "bad, awful" etc but "terrible" => "terribly". Is there a specific ...
1
vote
1answer
699 views

What kind of noun is “iPhone”? [duplicate]

I've always found it a bit peculiar that Apple's marketing refers to iPhone without an article. There is a question here which discusses why it feels more natural to use an article, but I'm wondering ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Adjectives versus Noun Adjuncts [duplicate]

What determines whether something is a "noun adjunct" or just a garden-variety adjective? Does it matter in any meaningful way? Here is my hypothesis, but I can't find any authoritative source to ...
9
votes
5answers
4k views

Parts of speech and functions: “Bob made a book collector happy the other day”

Having been bamboozled by various questions and answers on this site, I'd like to know what are the parts of speech (POS) and grammatical functions of the words and phrases in the following sentence: ...
14
votes
4answers
799 views

Grammatical role of “the hell”?

I’m wondering exactly which grammatical role the word hell takes on in expressions such as Get the hell out of here the hell in this case seems to modify the phrasal verb to get out (get out ...
4
votes
8answers
2k views

What is the difference between a part of speech and a syntactic function / grammatical relation?

What is the difference between a part-of-speech and a function? In other words: What is a part of speech. (e.g. noun) What is a grammatical function. (e.g. head, subject) [read "grammatical ...
3
votes
2answers
416 views

Telling if a word is a verb in the imperative mood

I'm working on a static analysis tool for the documentation in the Python programming language (PEP257). For this, I need to check if the first word in a documentation string is a verb in the ...
1
vote
2answers
169 views

Is there a word for “types of nouns”?

I know "parts of speech" is used to mean nouns, adjectives, verbs, etc., but is there a word or phrase for "types of nouns" that would include subject, direct object, indirect object, etc.?
4
votes
3answers
483 views

Are modal verbs and auxiliary verbs actually verbs?

A friend recently told me that "can" is a rare verb without an infinitive. I have since looked it up and discovered it is an auxiliary verb. In my mind it modifies a "proper" verb in much the same way ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

In this sentence, what parts of speech are the words 'next' and 'last'?

Could someone please tell me what the word 'next' and 'last' are? I mean the word class. 'it's your turn next ish' 'I read the letters last ish' Thank you!
2
votes
4answers
457 views

What is the general term that describes subjects and objects? (direct, indirect and prepositional objects)

John gave Jack money with enthusiasm. John is the subject, Jack the indirect object, money the direct object, and enthusiasm a prepositional object. Is there a general term that describes the "...
1
vote
2answers
260 views

What’s Up: Adverb vs Preposition

I start with a simple sentence: “I climb the ladder.” This contains a nice transitive verb with a clear direct object. If I slightly modify the sentence: “I climb up the ladder.” I believe that I ...
0
votes
1answer
138 views

Part of Speech, adverb or adjective? [closed]

From a part of Pollyanna written by Elenor Porter: "There ain't no tellin'," sobbed Nancy. "She lay back that white an' still she might easy be dead; but Miss Polly said she wa'n't dead--an' ...
1
vote
4answers
529 views

Decomposing “fingerprint”

I somehow ended up in a small argument about the first part of the compound word "fingerprint". The other person insists that the first word "finger" is an adjective, which I cannot agree with. "...
2
votes
3answers
211 views

Can “those” be used in “those good at writing” or “those who …”?

Can "those" be used in "those good at writing" or "those who ..." to refer to a group of people shared the same attribute described by the phrase after "those"? If it is possible (since I have found ...
6
votes
5answers
3k views

Why is the word “how” considered an adverb, even if the answer is an adjective?

Consider this question and its related answer: Question: How was the pizza? Answer: It was delicious. The question is asking how, which is defined in every dictionary as an adverb,...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Is the phrase “for one of both of us” grammatically correct?

In portal, Glados at one point says this: "and I thought of a solution that would be the best for one of both of us." I am debating about whether or not the construction of "for one of both of us" is ...
1
vote
1answer
237 views

Can 'to' in 'to + verb' be an adverb?

The 'to infinitive' has the structure to + verb as in to go, to eat, to ride, etc. The word 'to' is thought to be a preposition. However, since a preposition needs an object and a verb cannot be an ...