Linguistic categories explaining how words are used. Examples are the verb, the noun, the pronoun, the adjective, the adverb, the preposition, the conjunction, and the interjection.

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1answer
9k views

What part of speech are the words the, a, my, that, your, each, every, etc, or what category do they fall under? [closed]

What part of speech are the a my that your each every etc, or what category do they fall under? The reason I am asking this is that I am programming a sentence generator, and my sentence ...
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2answers
292 views

Can the verb “intake” be used intransitively? [closed]

Can a combustion engine be said to intake oxygen?
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1answer
131 views

Adverb or adjective?

In this sentence, is "declining" an adverb? Gerund (noun that uses a verb + ing form)? Or adjective? The university's board of trustees, being worried over declining student enrollments and ...
0
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1answer
7k views

How to know what part of speech is “there” in some cases? [closed]

I've been doing some ELA homework and I noticed that 'there' is not always the same POS. It seems to be an adverb, a noun, a pronoun, and several other POS in various contexts. How would one ...
1
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2answers
575 views

What part of speech are “plus”, “times”, and “minus”

In mathematics one will often say "This plus that" or "This times that". This means "This added too that" and "This multiplied by that". Multiply, Add, Subtract, Divide - All are verbs. But what part ...
3
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2answers
170 views

“Now that x, y,” vs. “Now x, y” (“Now” in dependent clauses): British vs. American English

I have noticed that British English speakers tend not to use that after now in certain dependent clauses where American English speakers will almost certainly use it. BE version of two examples: ...
0
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1answer
134 views

What part of speech is “that” in this phrase?

I know that "that" can function as many different parts of speech, so what part of speech is it in the phrase "the stuff that dreams are made of"?
2
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1answer
492 views

What is the function of “doing” in “when doing something”?

Can anyone please explain if "doing" in "When doing something" is a base+ing verbal, or a present participle used as a verb in an elliptical sentence, or something else entirely. Here's an example of ...
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2answers
142 views

Part of speech for non reflexive “oneself”

The words myself, yourself, himself and the like usually function as reflexive pronouns. However, they are also used in context that do not fulfill the common definitions of reflexive. Neither the ...
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2answers
568 views

What part of speech is “down” in “down went the Titanic”?

Down went the Titanic. What part of speech is down in this context? I have to choose between a) Preposition, b) Noun, c) Verb, and d) Adjective. But I think the correct answer should be "adverb", ...
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2answers
100 views

How to find words which are related morphologically?

I'm looking for a book, or any other source, which lists words that are morphologically related, like this: imagine verb imagination noun imaginative adjective Or this: medic ...
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1answer
116 views

Is this “debate” a noun or a verb?

Monday's vote opens the floor to debate on the bill and the Senate is expected to schedule a full vote by week's end.
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1answer
6k views

Is There a Way to Remember Nouns, Verbs & Adjectives [closed]

Is there a simple and concise way to remember nouns, adjectives and verbs aside from poems? I am aware of a number of poems available to aid memory, but I am looking for something a lot more simple. ...
1
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1answer
300 views

Diagramming and use of please as interjection

When diagramming the sentence, "Simon, would you please sing now?", should I diagram Simon or you as the subject? Would you be diagrammed as pronoun and please as an interjection? I am trying to help ...
0
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1answer
311 views

What part of speech are articles before possessive adjectives?

Today I was diagramming a sentence when I noticed something that confused me. I had a sentence that was basically like this: A parent's greatest concern is rearing his children correctly. ...
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1answer
554 views

I am looking forward to …? (followed by a Gerund)?

I know, that I am looking forward to hearing from you. is correct. But I am not sure, if this holds also for other verbs? So is I am looking forward to taste your cookies. or is I ...
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2answers
1k views

Part of speech: “early” [closed]

What part of speech is early in "I had my lunch early"? Is it an adjective or an adverb?
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2answers
789 views

What kind of word is “place” in “take place”?

I'm currently analyzing verbs with Stanford CoreNLP and WordNet. I'm interested in particular in verb meanings. I came across sentences like "The scene takes place on the grass." and I found the verb ...
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1answer
623 views

Is “British” a noun or an adjective in “British PM”?

While reading through this question another occurred to me. If a headline reads British PM says no to inflatable cars. Is British a noun or an adjective? Granted, there are other noun forms of ...
4
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4answers
301 views

When to use “not to” and “to not”

I wonder what "structure" should one use, "to not" or "not to"? Is there a difference? is one more accepted? "It's human nature to not do what someone else wants" "Like I needed another reason ...
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4answers
1k views

Can “Apple” be an adjective? [duplicate]

What role is the word "apple" playing in the sentence "I ate the apple pie." Is apple an adjective? Or are apple and pie treated together as one noun. Is this true of all words used like this? Can ...
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1answer
166 views

Grammatical role of “kind of” [closed]

I would like to know what the grammatical construct "kind of + v" is? I kind of like cold weather or I kind of eat everything".
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1answer
1k views

How can I identify the role of an infinitive in a sentence?

Infinitives may function as nouns, adjectives or adverbs. Since infinitives are derived from verbs, they do express actions or states of being. However, there is some difficulty in identifying the ...
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3answers
272 views

Female adjective re job title

Why is it common to hear "women writers" or "woman doctor" but not "man author"? Isn't an adjective required in both cases, thus "female guitarist" and "male accountant"? I am asking about why the ...
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1answer
833 views

what form of grammar is the word “why” used as a pause? [duplicate]

In this sentence: If you're going to take that pie I just baked, why, you've got a lot of nerve. what role does the word "why" take? I know I've heard it in conversational speech enough to know ...
5
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3answers
192 views

Origin of “City of …”, “County of …”, “Town of …”

I'm curious about the numerous civic names (at least in Canada) which are in the 'of' form, by which I mean: City of Toronto, County of Wellington, etc. To me, this form sounds antiquated. I can ...
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1answer
140 views

“…three years in.” What does it mean when placing 'in' at the end of a sentence?

I read on Gabriel Weinberg's recent blog: "Startups are a long-term game. My best advice is to treat entrepreneurship as a career path, but it is easier said than done absent some amount of ...
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1answer
300 views

What is the function of “that” in this sentence?

What is the funcition of "that" in this sentence? The paper notes that conditions in the last warm period in the Atlantic are broadly similar to those observed now. — BBC News, October 7, ...
4
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1answer
252 views

What is there in the English corpus beside nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, etc?

As you can see from this NGram, the total number of words in the indexed English corpus that were nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, determinants, pronouns, adpositions, numerals, conjunctions, or ...
4
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1answer
423 views

Identifying the class of this word

I'm reading the Wikipedia page on garden-path sentences. One example is: The government plans to raise taxes were defeated. What class of word is government in this sentence? I read this ...
1
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1answer
866 views

Part of speech: “I am disappointed with”

In a construction such as, "John is disappointed with Alice", what part of speech is disappointed with? It appears to me that the "am" is a linking verb. Similarly, "Jessica is sad", it seems to me ...
2
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3answers
28k views

What part of speech is “that” in each of the following sentences that mean the same?

It was all planned well before today that I can be sure about. Here I believe that that is subordinating conjunction. It was all planned well before today; I can be sure about that. Here I ...
2
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3answers
3k views

When is “here” an adverb or a noun?

In the sentence "I hope you are all paying attention, here is a sentence I made earlier", is here an adverb or a noun? I think it is a noun, but if I substitute a noun or a pronoun for here, the ...
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2answers
184 views

Part of speech of “clean” in “burn the prophet clean”

Please guide me for the part of speech of clean here in this extract: He had schooled him in the evils that befall prophets; in those that come from the world, which are trifling, and those that ...
6
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3answers
834 views

What part of speech is “methinks”?

Dictionaries call this word a verb, but it doesn't seem to behave like any other verb in the English language. Another question on this site calls it a “conjoined pronoun-verb combination”, which ...
6
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4answers
6k views

What part of speech does “here” have in “I am here”?

What part of speech does here have in the following sentence? I am here. I say that in that sentence, here must be an adverb because: It modifies the verb am by describing where I am. Am is a ...
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1answer
569 views

What are the possible part of speech combinations for compound nouns?

I am currently working through allowable part of speech combinations for the first two words of an English sentence. It seems troubling to me to allow the first two words of a sentence to both be ...
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2answers
3k views

Word to describe the quality of being optional or mandatory

Something like 'Optionality' or 'Ordinality'? (It's similar in kind to the words "Arity" and "Cardinality") Example: "Fred listed the XXXity of each parameter, noting whether it was optional or ...
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1answer
186 views

What part of speech is “(noun) the (noun)”? [closed]

What part of speech is the part boldfaced in these sentences? Chell the protagonist of Portal is a woman. Ludwig Wittgenstein the Austrian-British philosopher worked primarily in logic. Tim ...
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1answer
234 views

Interpretation of 'have' as stative or dynamic

Please bear with me. It's been a long time since I looked up grammatical concepts. The sentence is: I can quite clearly see the bewildered looks you will be having on your faces on reading this. ...
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2answers
121 views

Usage of the article 'a' before bait in this particular instance

Is it acceptable to use the article 'a' before 'bait' in this sentence? Is there a difference in meaning here when you use 'a' or drop it? "You would not have sent it to me for no reason. It was a ...
2
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2answers
106 views

What is/are the part(s) of “out of” in the phrase “move out of the way”?

In the phrase “move out of the way”, what is the part of speech of the word “out”? of the word “of”?
2
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3answers
3k views

What are the parts of speech of “at” and “least” in “at least”?

As in “It travels faster than sound at least.” After considering the alternative at the very least, I'm thinking at is a preposition, and least is — well, stumping me. Can we have it be as normal, a ...
3
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4answers
1k views

Is “messaging” a noun, a verb, or an adjective?

In the cruel jargon of software, it is common to see the phrase "messaging system", as if "messaging" were an adjective. Yet if I am "brushing" my teeth, it's a verb. There is an act of "brushing", ...
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1answer
113 views

“Bongo is screaming”: is “screaming” an adjective? [closed]

If I say, "Bongo is screaming", would screaming be an adjective?
2
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2answers
1k views

Is “12:30” (the time of day) an abstract noun?

Nothing else to add, I just want to make sure.
4
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4answers
866 views

Adverbial form of “timely”

The following sentence seems incorrect to me, because the adjective timely is being used as an adverb: Payments not received timely will be returned and additional interest will be due. That ...
2
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2answers
514 views

What's the part of speech of the noun after 'twice'?

He could earn twice his present salary at the new job. Twice two is four. Merriam-Webster says ‘twice’ followed by a noun is an adverb. In this case, is the noun still called a noun or something ...
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2answers
614 views

Is “on” part of a verb phrase in “Put Item on Hold?”

For an interface I'm working on, there's a command available to a user called "Put Item On Hold." Or possibly it should be "Put Item on Hold," since the style guide I'm using says that prepositions ...
4
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1answer
365 views

Building a phrase structure of “On the weekend …”

I'm reading Foundations of Statistical Natural Language Processing, and I'm doing one of the early exercises, trying to work out some of the language infliction about the word 'fun'. On the ...