3
votes
1answer
176 views

Why is the word “so” in the line, “To a ill-informed person I would have so answer yes,” shown in Italic to stress the word?

I am interested in the word, “so” in the following sentence in Jeffery Archer’s novel, “The Prodigal Daughter.” Florentina Kane who is the chairman of an international hotel empire she succeeded ...
1
vote
2answers
448 views

“sufferings” is plural though it is uncountable,but how?

We know that there is no plural form of the "uncountable noun," but, for example, we write: His sufferings force us to retain pity for him. Is it possible to make an uncountable noun plural? If ...
4
votes
1answer
147 views

What evidence is there that 'to' belongs to any particular part of speech?

What part of speech is to as in: I need to know. To err is human, to forgive divine. What am I to do? This question is not really about the difference in meaning between the examples. It is a ...
4
votes
0answers
71 views

Are there nouns that embody adjectives+verbs? (Not asking about attributive nouns) [closed]

I'm not sure if there's a better way for me to word my question. I've sorted through "noun" + "adjective" search results here on SE, but found nothing approximating what I'm after. I'm trying to ...
4
votes
6answers
547 views

Can an adverb be a noun?

I have seen this post for the answer to my question, but this is not much help in case of the question I am going to ask. Here is an example sentence - The new design of Twitter profile is more ...
5
votes
2answers
152 views

Are “this” and “next” demonstrative determiners?

Question 1: In the following, is this a demonstrative determiner: I will go to the store this week. Question 2: If so, then what class is next in the following: I will go to the store next ...
2
votes
1answer
482 views

The difference between “parts of speech”, “word classes”, “word categories”?

As a foreign language speaker, I find it hard to distinguish these terms. I've searched on the net; on wikipedia, on grammar.about.com, and some other pages, yet still having difficulties. One just ...
0
votes
0answers
53 views

“Me neither” - why oblique case? [duplicate]

I don't like white wine. Me neither. We're talking about subjects here, so naturally the pronoun should be "I". The use of "me" would only make sense to me if "neither" was a postposition. ...
3
votes
3answers
310 views

Does “away” serve as an adverb or an adjective in the following sentence?

The shop is five minutes away. According to the dictionary, away is an adverb. An adverb modifies a verb. In the above example, what word does away modify? Why is away not an adjective? ...
4
votes
2answers
478 views

What part of speech is the word “found” in the sentence below

A whale found dead on the southern Spanish coast was found to have swallowed 17 kg of plastic waste, including plastic bags. I assumed it was a verb, as in a reduced passive form (a whale that was ...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

How to know what part of speech is “there” in some cases? [closed]

I've been doing some ELA homework and I noticed that 'there' is not always the same POS. It seems to be an adverb, a noun, a pronoun, and several other POS in various contexts. How would one ...
2
votes
1answer
325 views

What is the function of “doing” in “when doing something”?

Can anyone please explain if "doing" in "When doing something" is a base+ing verbal, or a present participle used as a verb in an elliptical sentence, or something else entirely. Here's an example of ...
1
vote
2answers
85 views

How to find words which are related morphologically?

I'm looking for a book, or any other source, which lists words that are morphologically related, like this: imagine verb imagination noun imaginative adjective Or this: medic ...
1
vote
2answers
769 views

Part of speech: “early” [closed]

What part of speech is early in "I had my lunch early"? Is it an adjective or an adverb?
1
vote
4answers
834 views

Can “Apple” be an adjective? [duplicate]

What role is the word "apple" playing in the sentence "I ate the apple pie." Is apple an adjective? Or are apple and pie treated together as one noun. Is this true of all words used like this? Can ...
5
votes
3answers
260 views

Female adjective re job title

Why is it common to hear "women writers" or "woman doctor" but not "man author"? Isn't an adjective required in both cases, thus "female guitarist" and "male accountant"? I am asking about why the ...
1
vote
1answer
497 views

what form of grammar is the word “why” used as a pause? [duplicate]

In this sentence: If you're going to take that pie I just baked, why, you've got a lot of nerve. what role does the word "why" take? I know I've heard it in conversational speech enough to know ...
2
votes
1answer
132 views

“…three years in.” What does it mean when placing 'in' at the end of a sentence?

I read on Gabriel Weinberg's recent blog: "Startups are a long-term game. My best advice is to treat entrepreneurship as a career path, but it is easier said than done absent some amount of ...
0
votes
1answer
218 views

What is the function of “that” in this sentence?

What is the funcition of "that" in this sentence? The paper notes that conditions in the last warm period in the Atlantic are broadly similar to those observed now. — BBC News, October 7, ...
-3
votes
1answer
146 views

What part of speech is “(noun) the (noun)”? [closed]

What part of speech is the part boldfaced in these sentences? Chell the protagonist of Portal is a woman. Ludwig Wittgenstein the Austrian-British philosopher worked primarily in logic. Tim ...
-1
votes
1answer
220 views

Interpretation of 'have' as stative or dynamic

Please bear with me. It's been a long time since I looked up grammatical concepts. The sentence is: I can quite clearly see the bewildered looks you will be having on your faces on reading this. ...
0
votes
2answers
118 views

Usage of the article 'a' before bait in this particular instance

Is it acceptable to use the article 'a' before 'bait' in this sentence? Is there a difference in meaning here when you use 'a' or drop it? "You would not have sent it to me for no reason. It was a ...
-6
votes
1answer
101 views

“Bongo is screaming”: is “screaming” an adjective? [closed]

If I say, "Bongo is screaming", would screaming be an adjective?
1
vote
1answer
577 views

How to identify adjectives [closed]

I’m revisiting/studying about adjectives in “Adjectives” at Capital Community College Guide to Grammar and Writing. First I learn that articles are adjectives, but then there follows a paragraph in ...
6
votes
1answer
901 views

Adverb vs. direct object [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What exactly is an “adverb”? Consider the following sentences: She went home. He swam yesterday. Are the words "home" and "yesterday" adverbs or direct ...
9
votes
4answers
920 views

What part of speech is “worth”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the lexical class of the word 'worth' when used in a sentence like “Is this apple worth $3?” In a sentence like the following: The ...
1
vote
2answers
161 views

Analysing “So amazed he cannot speak” [closed]

In the sentence: "So amazed he cannot speak", is "amazed" an adjective?
1
vote
1answer
924 views

Usage of “than”

Buying on margin means borrowing money from a broker to buy more securities than can be purchased with one's own money alone. I was wondering if than in the above example is a conjunction or ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

Is there a term for the part of a sentence that is in the form “Customers who …” or “Products that …”?

For the purpose of building a dynamic user interface within an software application I wish to separate parts of a set of phrases which would be in the form of the examples below. Examples: ...
9
votes
2answers
940 views

Do all words have a part of speech?

Do all words have a part of speech? The closest counterexample I can think of is yes. The dictionary says its supposed to be an adverb but it doesn't really strike me as something that modifies a ...
5
votes
2answers
4k views

The grammatical function of “How”

What is the grammatical function of "how" in this sentence: He told us how to do it.
1
vote
2answers
22k views

“As of late” or “as of lately”?

The title pretty much summarizes my question. For example, in the following sentence She has developed an accent while living overseas, which as of late(ly) became more pronounced. I usually ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

What part of speech is the “be + verb” here? What tense are these sentences in?

I shall have him be killed. She is to be stoned for adultery. What are the constructions be +verb called, grammatically? I feel like the above sentences are very adjectival in nature, more ...
4
votes
5answers
2k views

Can someone help me diagram this sentence?

I'm trying to do a sentence/phrase analysis of the following sentence. I just can't figure out, what would “No matter the season” be (Adv. of ...) in terms of sentence elements. And the next question ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Can adjectives always be used as nouns when they denote a plural and are preceded by the definite article?

An adjective appears to be used as a noun when denoting an animate plural and preceded by the definite article: 'The successful are those who strive.' 'The foolish are those who ...
8
votes
2answers
427 views

How did 'mad' come to be a determiner?

There's a group of words — I think they're called determiners — used to indicate number in some way... like many, few, most, etc. During a linguistics class my professor said this was a closed group ...
16
votes
4answers
6k views

What part of speech is “on” in “on fire”?

A while ago, there was an answer on Jeopardy! along the following lines: In the sentence he was on fire, the word on is this part of speech. The judges ruled that it was a preposition. But I ...
11
votes
4answers
660 views

“Employee” in the phrase “employee ID” is a determiner, not an adjective—right?

I am a software developer with a bit of a linguistic slant. We were recently given some training on how to name database fields and were told to avoid adjectives in names. Then we were given an ...