0
votes
0answers
14 views

Parallelism between past perfect and present continuous

In the following sentence: Anyone who has stumbled glumly through a British airport recently, trapped in endless queues, will already know the stench of bogus security hanging heavy in the ...
6
votes
1answer
108 views

Grammar rules for parellelism in comparisons and variations according to verb placement

I'm an academic editor in the field of medicine and I often come across complex comparisons. My question is specifically regarding how the placement of the verb affects the the parallelism of the ...
2
votes
1answer
113 views

Correct usage of “help” and parallelism

I want to combine "A helps B to Verb1." and "A helps C to Verb2." into one sentence. However, "A helps B Verb1." and "A helps C Verb2." are also correct sentences. ("to" can be omitted.) So, my ...
1
vote
2answers
211 views

Parallel structure “both from A and B” grammatically correct?

Can I write this? His results, derived both from research and observation, are critical for the project. Or will I have to write either of these? His results, derived both from research and ...
1
vote
3answers
284 views

When can you omit words in a parallel strucutre?

First of all, I am not a native English speaker, so this is always confusing. I wrote the following sentence: Due to its hydrophobic property, beta-carotene in carrots is more easily absorbed ...
6
votes
2answers
675 views

What's the rule for writing sentences with parallel clauses?

I've sometimes seen very nicely written sentences that have 2 clauses: the first is a full sentence, while the second, which is supposed to have a similar structure, was shorten into a special ...