This tag is for questions concerning the written representation of the English language, especially spelling and word breaks (including hyphenation).

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3
votes
2answers
3k views

Is “Viet Nam” a mistake, a typo, an archaic spelling, a regional spelling, or an idiosyncrasy? [closed]

Is "Viet Nam" a mistake, a typo, an archaic spelling, a regional spelling, or an idiosyncrasy of the author? I found the word in this book, and I can't really tell what type of spelling it is.
0
votes
1answer
137 views

“Stickied thread” or “sticked thread”, when talking about internet forum thread

What is the more correct form? Quick Google research tells that first form is more popular, but don't give a definitive answer about what is the most appropriate.
0
votes
1answer
78 views

Question about a sentence in OWL Exercises

About the Exercise: Adjective or Adverb Exercise 1: #3 They proved to be perfectly exact measurements... Isn't this an impossible fact; consequently a incorrect sentence otherwise what is supposed to ...
5
votes
6answers
9k views

“Bald Faced Lie” vs. “Bold Faced Lie”

Which of these is correct? What is the origin of this expression? I've searched here on the exchange and haven't found an answer.
-2
votes
1answer
2k views

Is “wrongly” even a word? [closed]

I came across a news article using the word wrongly. I was told that wrongly isn't a real word. But I saw this in a leading newspaper and wanted a clarification. Also, what is the difference between ...
-1
votes
1answer
225 views

what is the difference between turn out and come out

What should be the correct answer for the question below.Please help. Nobody believed Galileo's theory initially but it -came out- to be right. (1)worked out (2)turned out (3)carried out (4)no ...
2
votes
3answers
588 views

Noun phrase converted to verb, is a hyphen needed?

When "air kiss" is treated as a verb, as in "they air kissed", should it be hyphenated to "air-kissed"?
3
votes
3answers
434 views

Words with Transposed or Inverted Syllables

In its definition of sideburns, Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, Eleventh Edition (2003) refers to the spelling as an "anagram of burnsides." But since derubniss, sisburden, and ubersnids are ...
0
votes
1answer
193 views

Is spelling part of Language? [closed]

In response to another question I asked, I was told spelling is not a part of language because it is a part of writing. This statement confuses me. Writing is a form of communication and is ...
0
votes
1answer
89 views

programme or program [duplicate]

I am wondering which is the correct version? Furthermore, the official length of my programme of study: 3.5 years of full-time study and 16 weeks of internship. Furthermore, the official ...
-1
votes
1answer
672 views

How to hyphenate “right mouse click”

What's the proper way to hyphenate the expression "right mouse click". I'm writing documentation for some software I wrote. "Please right mouse click on ...".
0
votes
1answer
3k views

How to spell 'ewww' as in 'ewww ahhh' [closed]

I was wondering how I should spell 'ewww' as in 'ewww ahhh': Bob showed Jill his most impressive set of magic cards. Jill, impressed, said, 'ewwww[sp?] ahhhhhh.' ...
2
votes
2answers
376 views

Alignment or alinement?

I was reading Wonders of World Aviation the other day, published in the late thirties, and have found a couple of articles where alinement is preferred to alignment. While this seems to make sense, it ...
0
votes
2answers
21k views

Full-time or full time, part-time or part time?

Having a debate here over how to form the description of employment. A) Bob works full time on the project. B) Bob works full-time on the project. The same applies for part time/part-time. Which ...
0
votes
1answer
378 views

Hyphen omission: a matter of habit or plain error?

I'm not a native English speaker so I'm struggling to get this right. I understand (and this question confirms) that compound adjectives such as well-organized, high-level, Spanish-speaking, etc, ...
1
vote
0answers
1k views

Why do certain words have the same type of spelling but different pronunciation? [duplicate]

There are words like 'but' , 'cut' etc pronounced in the same way, but 'put' is pronounced differently. Put has the same structure as but and cut (One 'u' between two consonants). So why is it ...
0
votes
3answers
439 views

Why are “some” letters silent in English? [closed]

There are many such words that we all know about, but please explain why the makers of the English language made up words with silent letters?
5
votes
1answer
152 views

“strain gauge” or “gage”?

When referring to a device that measures tensile or compressive force, is the correct spelling strain gauge or strain gage? I realize that in general gage is an archaic spelling of the word gauge, ...
1
vote
3answers
532 views

“Out-of-this-world experiences” vs. “out of this world experiences”

I was wondering if the hyphenated version should be used? The context is: Introducing the World Cup box from McDonald's: the meal filled with out of this world experiences.
2
votes
4answers
1k views

Why is the Christian god being spelled with a lowercase letter? [duplicate]

It's been going on for some time, but the phenomenon which was once seen as almost an act of rebellion is now becoming more commonplace. God, capitalized, is increasingly seen only at the start of a ...
2
votes
4answers
3k views

Where does 'doofus' (or perhaps 'dufus') come from?

Both Dufus and Doofus seem to be common on the web, so I'm not sure which is the correct spelling, if either. It's kind of a cool word. Do we have any idea where/how it originated?
6
votes
4answers
2k views

'Postpone' or 'postphone'?

I was taught that the word postpone was spelled as I just spelled it, but recently I have seen a rise in the spelling postphone (or post phone). At first, I thought it was just a spelling error, but I ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Possessive and plural suffixes for proper nouns ending in -s [closed]

With a name that ends in -s, such as Travis or Lewis, where and when should you use -es, -'s, -s or just leave it alone to both pluralise, and to infer belonging to? E.g., if the ball belongs to ...
1
vote
1answer
643 views

An e in “absured”?

A few paragraphs in to Chapter 3 of "How to win friends and influence people"—a book that I'm embarrassed to admit I've undertaken—I found what just appears to be an odd spelling for "absurd." ...
1
vote
1answer
159 views

Pronunciation of “great” vs. “treat” [closed]

Why is great pronounced /greit/ while in other words the ea is pronounced differently? Take treat, for example: /tri:t/. Why are two words with the same number of vowels and consonants and the same ...
2
votes
1answer
552 views

Words at beginning of sentences with first letter displayed within brackets?

I've been reading The Deer Slayer, and I can't help but notice that some words at the beginning of sentences display their first letter within square brackets. Here are some examples: [W]hen five ...
4
votes
2answers
358 views

If a letter isn't pronounced but affects pronunciation of other letters, is it still 'silent'?

The 'e' in paste isn't pronounced on its own, but changes the pronunciation of the 'a'. In that case, is the 'e' still referred to as silent?
0
votes
3answers
264 views

“Cheeseslicer” or “cheese slicer”?

Can somebody confirm if the correct spelling is cheeseslicer or cheese slicer? I always thought in English words are not written together when combined, but some online dictionaries are contradictory ...
3
votes
3answers
158 views

Is it commonly accepted using the slash to mean “as well as”, rather than “or”?

I hope this is the end of blind US/UK support for a state with a shocking record of human rights. (BBC) As is well known, the most common use of the slash is to link words which are alternative, ...
0
votes
1answer
601 views

What happens when baker's, butcher's, etc. are in the plural?

If the singular it is: The baker's and the butcher's are closed on Sundays. Which one is the plural? Bakers and butchers are closed on Sundays. Bakers' and butchers' are closed on ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

hallo or hello: etymology dilemma

Does anybody know the etymology of the main greeting in English: hallo? Besides that I wish to know the difference between the terms hallo and hello. I have to know!
-2
votes
0answers
53 views

'whom' vs 'who' [duplicate]

How does one use 'whom' in a sentence? Is this sentence correct? Ex: I am delighted for all my cousins who have found happiness.
3
votes
2answers
182 views

Hyphens when using “something + style” to describe something?

He lit the fire Cherokee style. or: He lit the fire Cherokee-style. I have seen both. Which is correct? And, if it's the second option, then what about "multiple words + style"? E.g.: ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Should I use a hyphen in the term “in(-)situ visualization”?

The term in(-)situ visualization denotes a visualization or graphics that is depicted in place, for instance, a sparkline that is embedded into text. As the dictionaries tell, the adjective or adverb ...
9
votes
1answer
558 views

When did it become incorrect to use apostrophes with possessive pronouns?

I'm reading Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility, and I notice that she invariably uses an apostrophe with possessive pronouns — in a way that would be considered incorrect now. For example: (Elinor is ...
0
votes
1answer
569 views

Can “Any Other Business” be generally perceived, and used as the legit business terms?

I was interested in the fact that the first letter of the each word of “Any Other Business” is shown in the upper case in the following sentence: “At the first meeting of the new bard, Townsend ...
3
votes
0answers
50 views

Origin and name for horizontal line hiding date or place name [duplicate]

Does anyone know a) the origins, or b) the name of the convention of replacing dates or place names in 18th / 19th century novels with a horizontal line? I'm not asking for the reasons authors did ...
3
votes
2answers
218 views

How did the spelling “demesne” come about? [closed]

The word demesne seems to just be an alternative spelling of the rather more logically-spelt domain. I'm wondering how this strange spelling came about? Even taking into account its given etymology ...
1
vote
1answer
802 views

Sub-classification or subclassification? [closed]

We’re debating this at work. Merriam-Webster says it’s “subclassification”. Dictionary.Reference.com allows “sub-classification” and “subclassification” Is there a ‘more correct’ word to use? ...
-1
votes
2answers
794 views

Do I capitalize or write out 'first' if I write: “Her birthday was May First.”?

I'm writing a story in which a character's birthday (May 1st) is significant. A characters notes in conversation that, "Her birthday is May first." Should I write out 'first' or refer to it as '1st'? ...
1
vote
1answer
132 views

“Spoon feed” vs. “spoonfeed” [closed]

Is there a whitespace in spoonfeed? I have to choose between writing Spoon Feed Code and Spoonfeed Code.
3
votes
2answers
114 views

Is afeast or possibly affeast, afeest etc. a word?

My English (vai Liverpool)-Canadian mother used this word to mean 'disgusted by' or 'repulsed by.' Example: "he is afeast of mixed foods." meaning you think mixed foods are disgusting or inedible. I ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Writing double voiced vowels [duplicate]

I have a pretty straight forwards question I think. Of the following three spellings, which one is generally accepted as correct (I've seen them all, well, something like it) reemerge re-emerge ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Is there a term to describe words whose pronunciation bears no relationship to their spelling?

The English language is peppered with wonderfully weird spelling/pronunciation combinations. For example colonel, pronounced kur-nl, probably my favorite there isn't even an r in the word! ...
0
votes
1answer
223 views

How do I express the plural of a letter in writing?

My last name has two occurrences of the letter "s" in it, so in speech I tell people all the time that it's spelled "with two esses". However I don't know how to express such a thing in writing. I can ...
4
votes
1answer
739 views

What is the name for words which, when the order of letters is reversed, spell other words?

For example: Lamina / Animal Dog / God Ogre / Ergo Desserts / Stressed Tuba / Abut These are all anagrams, but they are a special type of anagram, where the order of letters is exactly reversed. ...
2
votes
1answer
10k views

University's vs Universities', correct spelling of the possessive [closed]

Something belongs to the University. Is it the Universities' logo or the University's logo? I somehow don't think University's exists.
2
votes
0answers
42 views

What is the correct capitalization of code examples when beginning a sentence? [duplicate]

I am writing a technical book and a lot of it is structured as explanations of code examples. For instance: var links = data.map(function (d) { return {source: nick_id(d.from), ...
0
votes
1answer
74 views

Usage and spelling of “wordlength” and “bitbreadth”

As far as I know, these are the meanings: wordlength — for instance, 4 bytes when the bitbreadth is 32 and 8 bytes when the bitbreadth is 64. bitbreadth — for example, 32 or 64 or 4 bits for a ...
2
votes
1answer
506 views

How to form a gerund from “practise”?

I (think) I know the difference between practise (verb) and practice (non-verb). However, I am not sure which form I should use in cases like the following ones: I love practising the guitar. ...