This tag is for questions concerning the written representation of the English language, especially spelling and word breaks (including hyphenation).

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0
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1answer
37 views

usage of separable and inseparable words [duplicate]

Words like wheelbarrow and nailbrush are used mingled, the wheel goes with barrow in inseparable form. On the other hand, words like tank top and high heels as it sounds ...
-1
votes
1answer
72 views

Spelling of the word “Cancelled” [duplicate]

Long ago in grade school we were taught the correct spelling WAS "Cancelled." When did they (spelling police?) decide it is "Canceled?" Personally drives me nuts. I dislike flying and try to avoid it. ...
1
vote
1answer
92 views

Why is “welcome” spelled like this? [duplicate]

Why is the word "welcome" spelled with one "l"? Somewhere in the answers I found a good explanation of the meaning of " welcome". Example: "You have done well to come to me; I am pleased to do it" ...
0
votes
3answers
72 views

English language for in between [closed]

What would be the correct spelling for "in between" for the following: From the Sierra's to the sea and everywhere in between. or From the Sierra's to the sea and everywhere inbetween.
4
votes
2answers
144 views

What is the significance of having a silent letter like “k” in a word? [duplicate]

Why is the k silent in: known /nəʊn/; knife /nʌɪf/, and knight /nʌɪt/? What does this specify?And what is k doing there if there is no need to pronounce it?
0
votes
1answer
82 views

Why is “collaborate” not spelled “collabourate” in British English?

Everyone knows that labour in British English is labor in American English. However, a cursory examination of a dictionary shows the words collabourate and collabourator, derived from the mentioned ...
12
votes
2answers
421 views

Silent “e” at the end of words

Back in 2009, a job interviewer sent me a link to a web service that would help me make a free telephone call via the internet... Skype. As a native speaker, I knew "instinctively" to pronounce this ...
6
votes
2answers
287 views

Are you googlable?

The search engine Google was launched in 1998 and on that same year, the term googling was first used. The verb “to google” earned its official status in the Oxford English Dictionary on June 15, ...
4
votes
1answer
88 views

Is 'phone wrong?

I have seen phone spelled as 'phone. Obviously this is an acknowledgement that the full word used to be telephone. Is this spelling objectionable?
4
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0answers
51 views

Why does quizzes have two zs [duplicate]

I didn't think I had to add an extra z when making it plural, but I did. Why is that? Just some weird anomaly like so many things in English spelling? Or is there a history behind it?
8
votes
2answers
237 views

Why “paediatrics” but “pedagogue” in British English?

There's an account of the British ae/oe and American "e" spellings (as in diarrh(o)ea, f(a)eces, and other fun words) on wikipedia. What I'm wondering is why, even in British English, ...
15
votes
1answer
919 views

Why is “fridge” spelt with a 'd' but “refrigeration” spelt without one?

The question is in the title, why does the word, refrigeration not have a 'd' in it when fridge does?
2
votes
3answers
123 views

Demonyms - When a place ends on an “s” sound, why are its inhabitants sometimes spelled with a “t”? (e.g. Mars - Martian)

I am not natively English speaking and I was wondering about this spelling when I saw the title of the movie "The Martian". This pattern also seems to apply to other things ending on an "s" sound, ...
2
votes
1answer
36 views

Using hyphens: “Mona-Lisa-like” or “Mona Lisa-like”?

Would it be correct to say: The person had a Mona-Lisa-like expression. or The person had a Mona Lisa-like expression. It strikes me that the former is correct, but I wanted to be sure.
1
vote
2answers
45 views

Usage of the “non” word when describing something which does not belong to a project (or any organizational group)

The dictionary contains many words which start with "non", e.g. non-acceptance or nonacceptance (with a hyphen and without it). I tried to find out if I can build a new word by using the word "non" ...
2
votes
1answer
33 views

Holiday card help

Say my last name is soloniewicz. Is it: Happy holidays from the Soloniewicz's Happy holidays from the Soloniewiczs Happy holidays from the Soloniewiczes I'm leaning towards the number three, but ...
5
votes
2answers
100 views

Why did final -ie become so popular during early Modern English?

A hallmark of Early Modern English is that it exhibits a lot of variance between the use of final -y and -ie. In the 16th century -ie is even found in Old English words, eg stonie. And Mulcaster in ...
0
votes
4answers
62 views

slang-ism vs slangism vs slang [closed]

I came across the following sentence here in this community: It is a slangism for "optimal" or "tuned". I was about to edit it to the following: It is slang for "optimal" or "tuned". I ...
2
votes
2answers
68 views

Which is more correct: T-shirt or t-shirt?

Can we use small letter, while writing: T-shirt? What is correct and why: T-shirt or t-shirt? Thank you.
2
votes
2answers
104 views

Correct use of hyphenation with multi-word noun and adjective [duplicate]

I am not a native English speaker and was wondering how to properly combine the noun "password policy" and the adjective "based". So for "policy", I would write "policy-based", but how about ...
1
vote
2answers
59 views

“look-up tables”, “look up tables” or “lookup tables”

Do you have any advice which version of "look-up tables" vs. "look up tables" vs. "lookup tables" I should be prefer (in a scientific context)? ...which leads me to a [follow-up/followup/follow ...
1
vote
0answers
76 views

About how many words of four letters are there in English?

I was trying to determine about how many words there are in English, with four letters. (Ideally, excluding "s" plural, so cats and dogs would not be included.) Does anyone have any concrete ...
5
votes
2answers
255 views

Strong /strɔːŋ/ → stronger /strɔːŋɡər/ - Why do we have to put an extra /g/ in front of /ər/? Is it a rule?

Ok, see this in the dictionary: Strong /strɔːŋ/ --> Stronger /strɔːŋɡər/ Why do we have to put an extra /g/ in front of /ər/? But "/sing" /sɪŋ/ & "/singer" /ˈsɪŋər/ do not adhere to that rule. ...
0
votes
2answers
19 views

dictations, improving spelling [closed]

I'm looking for a website that would propose free dictations in English, so that I could listen and then type what I hear and at the end to see if I made any mistakes. I was searching in the Internet, ...
22
votes
1answer
2k views

Why are nouns corresponding to verbs ending with “oke” written with “c”?

I was wondering about this for a while now. Could anyone explain this phenomenon or is it just "English quirks"? Examples: invoke/invocation provoke/provocation revoke/revocation
0
votes
0answers
107 views

Why doesn't Buckingham Palace require an article? [duplicate]

There's a whole bunch of them that look as if they would require one, but actually don't: Times Square, Trafalgar Square, Union Square, Carnegie Hall, Central Park, Hyde Park, Westminster Abbey, ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Should I capititalize “Crime Science”? [duplicate]

Not sure if I should use crime science or Crime Science throughout my essay. When should I capitalize the term?
3
votes
1answer
85 views

touchscreen, touch-screen, touch screen? Merriam-Webster and Oxford disagree

I have searched but cannot find a definite answer on the correct to write "touch screen". Merriam-Webster says touch screen. Oxford says touchscreen. And random people around the internet say ...
0
votes
0answers
57 views

Use of ligatures such as æ and œ in English [duplicate]

As part of learning the language, I've noticed that ligatures such as æ and œ are no longer common in English. The ligatures are said to be primarily eschewed in favour of the digraphs ae or oe ...
4
votes
1answer
86 views

Why no 'b' in numeric etc

"Number" vs. "Numeric" Also "Enumerate" etc. If I were to guess, I might go for it relating to "Numeral", but I don't see why it should derive from the less common word, nor why Numeral has no b ...
0
votes
2answers
61 views

How should NA be written? [closed]

To my understanding it's an acronym for "Not Applicable", but I've noticed it written the following ways: na NA n/a ~na~ Is there a standard? What do different style guides say? ...
1
vote
1answer
68 views

Can we say that the words whose spelling is much contrary to the spelling rules get gradually expelled from English?

Can it be said that the words which are spelled too weird get gradually eliminated from English or their spelling changes to more phonetic? For instance I was thinking about the word "through" which ...
3
votes
1answer
104 views

Is there a word for misusing or adding letters to words/names?

Some people add or change letters that aren't in a word or name, i.e., "Simonese" cat instead of "Siamese" cat, and French "provinincial" furniture instead of French "provincial" furniture. Also ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

The term for misspellings that change the meaning of a sentence? [duplicate]

I am looking for the term that describes the use of a certain word in a sentence in place of the correct one; a word that happens to look very similar to the one actually needed, but has a different ...
0
votes
2answers
55 views

Word for letters that aren't typographically similar

For example I, 1, or l (lowercase L) can be indistinguishable from one another depending on the persons writing style. The same for the number 0 and the letter O. Is there a word for letters that are ...
2
votes
2answers
47 views

Word choice conundrum

This was presented to me years ago and I've not gotten what I consider a definitively right answer. I'm looking for the word that would go in the brackets in this sentence: There are three common ...
2
votes
0answers
80 views

Does using abbreviated/vernacular spelling affect reading speed? [closed]

The spelling in an average text message is quite bad ('u'=you, 'r'=are, 'l8r'=later, etc), and intentional abbreviations are often used for space concerns. Has the effect of this on reading speed and ...
-3
votes
1answer
84 views

Are punctuations ignored in movie titles? [closed]

There happen to be many movies which are not punctuated correctly. Since English is not my native language, I don't know whether punctuation usage in movie titles is just like punctuation usage for ...
5
votes
1answer
103 views

How are computers affecting spelling and usage? [closed]

Has spell check changed usage? I type the word "theatre" often; even here while I am typing it is underlined in red, yet Americans who direct, produce, or act in theatre prefer the older spelling. ...
1
vote
3answers
277 views

Nonsmoking or Non-smoking

Would one write that someone is “a nonsmoking so-and-so” or “a non-smoking so-and-so”? I'm not sure if the hyphen is necessary or superfluous.
0
votes
1answer
99 views

Origin of “Amurrica”

I can't remember the president or politician who famously pronounced America as "Amurrica". I hope someone else can. As in This is Amurrica. Also, is there a standard, or at least better, way ...
7
votes
1answer
177 views

'-ible' suffix vs. '-able' suffix

This question comes about because I usually always spell the word incorrectly and the spell checker underlines in red the word: compatible. In my head, I always want to spell it compatable, and my ...
2
votes
2answers
601 views

3D vs 3d vs 3-d vs 3-dimensional

How do you correctly abbreviate that something is in "three dimensions" in formal writing? As per the title, would you write either "3D", "3d", or "3-d"? I want to write something like: The ...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

Capitalization of “the” in “the Bible” [duplicate]

Which of these is correct capitalization? Mrs. Ohana gave me the Bible. Mrs. Ohana gave me The Bible.
3
votes
1answer
147 views

Conventions in Old English for use of thorn and eth

Somewhere I got the naive idea that, in Old English, thorn represented the unvoiced "th" sound and eth represented the voiced "th" sound. A little digging has suggested to me that each of the ...
0
votes
2answers
149 views

Why is sacrilegious not spelled like religious? [closed]

Clearly sacrilegious is not necessarily the opposite of religious but derived from the same root. One could make the argument that sacrilegious is also derived from sacred which would imply a ...
1
vote
2answers
5k views

Why is the plural of “basis” “bases” and not “baseis”?

Looking at the noun basis on Wiktionary.com, it indicates that the plural is either bases or baseis. It looks like the rare baseis comes from the Greek, but the common bases just refers back to basis ...
1
vote
1answer
99 views

Difference of hotspot versus hot spot

hot spot -vs- hotspot What's the difference between these two variants? When do I use them? An example sentence is as follows: "Biochar addition is becoming one of the hotspots in soil science." ...
1
vote
2answers
92 views

How do you spell explicitly my last name (Musiał)? [closed]

I need to know how I can spell my Polish last name, Musiał, for my future interviews. (soon :>) M as Margarita U as ..? S as I as A as Ł as - what about that character? Should i replace it by L, ...
2
votes
1answer
119 views

Is there an equivalent of diaeresis, but for consonants?

I know that diaeresis is used to show that two adjacent vowels are not a diphthong but should be pronounced separately, as in naïve or Zoë. Is there an equivalent mark or format in current ...