Questions about the part of speech governed by prepositions and active transitive verbs.

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3
votes
3answers
534 views

“Me” versus “I”

He was almost as bad at English as me. He was almost as bad at English as I. The first one sounds better as-is, but not when you change the second one to He was almost as bad at English as I was. ...
2
votes
2answers
426 views

why differences in Object vs Subject

We have different pronouns to express objects vs subjects: he vs him who vs whom etc. What's the point? What extra information is communicated by expressing object vs subject? Shouldn't it be ...
10
votes
1answer
15k views

Which is correct: “you and I” or “you and me”?

I was told the correct usage is for example: "My wife and me" but I hear often "I and my wife" or "my wife and I". Google gives 34M results for "My wife and I" and 909K results for "My wife and me" ...
5
votes
0answers
503 views

When do I use “me” and when “I”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Should I put myself last? I get this mixed up so often. Should I say: Me and Rob are going swimming. or I and Rob are going swimming. I know the latter ...
4
votes
2answers
499 views

What are direct and indirect objects to “provide”?

I'm always wondering when I want to write a sentence with provide. What is the correct way to say/write: to provide someone with something to provide someone something to provide something to ...
14
votes
7answers
44k views

Which is correct, “you and I” or “you and me”?

When the phrase is used as an object, why so many native speakers are saying "you and I" instead of "you and me"? I'm not a native speaker but I thought "you and me" is correct. Not sure if this falls ...
7
votes
3answers
894 views

What is a better way to write: only three people signed up: you, me and “thehulk66”

It is better to write this: Only three people signed up: you, Jim, and I. than this: Only three people signed up: you, me, and Jim. Because "I" is a subject and not an object. But ...
65
votes
5answers
6k views

What’s the rule for using “who” and “whom” correctly?

I can never figure out whether I should use who and whom. Most people use who for both colloquially, but that’s not correct. What’s the rule for using who and whom correctly?