Questions about the part of speech governed by prepositions and active transitive verbs.

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3
votes
3answers
3k views

Hyphen or no hyphen when modifying an adjective with a quantity?

I have a sentence which has an object that is described with an adjective: We need to inform our interested patrons of this change. If I modify "interested" with "more" or "less", do I connect ...
1
vote
2answers
580 views

Should I use “who” or “whom” as the only word in a sentence?

I understand that "who" is for the subject and "whom" is for the object. However, sometimes they are used as the only word in a sentence. For example: Person 1: Yeah, he ate the entire cake. ...
3
votes
3answers
399 views

Avoiding the use of “the reader”?

I'm writing a response essay to Medieval Women's Visionary writings that possess power. In this essay I'm supposed to explain how two writers, that I've picked to write about, possess or don't possess ...
6
votes
3answers
8k views

“like I” or “like me”?

In high school we learned to say "than I" and "as I" because you could potentially add an "am" to the end of the sentence. Examples: "She is smarter than I." (Think: "...than I am.") "He is as tall ...
4
votes
0answers
370 views

Why do we use a comma before “and”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Comma before last item in a list Often times, I find myself writing sentences like the following: "... to integrate four granularities of features: first, second, ...
13
votes
7answers
18k views

Which one is correct to say: “It's me” or “It's I”?

I was taught at school that the following expression is not grammatically correct: Who is there? It's me. The correct one is: Who is there? It's I. Can you let me know which one is ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Complement or object?

I saw him cross the road. Is cross the road the object of saw? Or is it the complement of him?
2
votes
2answers
575 views

Does “precluded from” require a direct object?

In a copy-editing job I'm doing, I came across the following phrase: "a man is precluded from all women except for his wife" - i.e., his sexual relationship with her is (should be, anyway) ...
3
votes
3answers
602 views

“Me” versus “I”

He was almost as bad at English as me. He was almost as bad at English as I. The first one sounds better as-is, but not when you change the second one to He was almost as bad at English as I was. ...
2
votes
2answers
448 views

why differences in Object vs Subject

We have different pronouns to express objects vs subjects: he vs him who vs whom etc. What's the point? What extra information is communicated by expressing object vs subject? Shouldn't it be ...
14
votes
1answer
17k views

Which is correct: “you and I” or “you and me”?

I was told the correct usage is for example: "My wife and me" but I hear often "I and my wife" or "my wife and I". Google gives 34M results for "My wife and I" and 909K results for "My wife and me" ...
5
votes
0answers
503 views

When do I use “me” and when “I”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Should I put myself last? I get this mixed up so often. Should I say: Me and Rob are going swimming. or I and Rob are going swimming. I know the latter ...
4
votes
2answers
549 views

What are direct and indirect objects to “provide”?

I'm always wondering when I want to write a sentence with provide. What is the correct way to say/write: to provide someone with something to provide someone something to provide something to ...
15
votes
7answers
83k views

Which is correct, “you and I” or “you and me”?

When the phrase is used as an object, why so many native speakers are saying "you and I" instead of "you and me"? I'm not a native speaker but I thought "you and me" is correct. Not sure if this falls ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

What is a better way to write: only three people signed up: you, me and “thehulk66”

It is better to write this: Only three people signed up: you, Jim, and I. than this: Only three people signed up: you, me, and Jim. Because "I" is a subject and not an object. But ...
74
votes
5answers
8k views

What’s the rule for using “who” and “whom” correctly?

I can never figure out whether I should use who and whom. Most people use who for both colloquially, but that’s not correct. What’s the rule for using who and whom correctly?