Questions about the part of speech governed by prepositions and active transitive verbs.

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Multiple memoirs about multiple authors' deaths

This sentence is from an image caption on the New Yorker's website: Memoirs rarely tremble with such life as when expressing their author's death. Why is it okay to say "their author's death" ...
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3answers
36 views

Should a different word be used when “what” is used as an object?

While speaking with a co-worker today, I asked "Who should I speak with?" I quickly corrected myself saying "With whom should I speak?" I followed with "What should I look at?" To ...
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3answers
183 views

You can't put a flower in an a**hole and call it a vase

I am not trying to be funny (other than the fact that the joke is, in and of itself, funny). I'm asking someone to parse this for me. Seems to me it should be something like, "You can't put a flower ...
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3answers
65 views

Do passive sentences have objects?

I was answering a question on ELL and I came across a question of my own, namely whether there are objects in passive sentences. In this case the sentence was, Bobby was ran [sic] over by Billy's ...
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3answers
321 views

Can a pronoun functioning as Object also be a Subject?

I want him to call me tomorrow. In this sentence we see: I, subject; want, verb; him, object. What is the subject of to call? Him? But him is the object of the verb want. Is this a correct ...
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1answer
73 views

Gerund phrase…is it really?

Object of Preposition Some people consider my interest in gardening an obsession. (The gerund phrase is “gardening an obsession.”) As I was searching around for the correct use of ...
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128 views

Is “away” an adverb in “He ran away”. Also, is it an Object?

Is 'away' the object of the verb 'ran' in: I ran away ... or is it an adverb modifying the verb 'ran'? It seems to be obligatory, which may indicate that it's a phrasal verb as ODO has a ...
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2answers
57 views

How to identify the object in a sentence? [closed]

What is the object in the sentence, "We went down the slope."
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2answers
47 views

Grammatically, what is “It” in the following sentence?

I'm currently working at a private academy in Korea, and my boss just asked me a real head-scratcher. In the sentence: It doesn't have to be hot and humid for players to lose too much water from ...
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1answer
61 views

Subject pronoun or object pronoun?

Here is a sentence: Everyone likes you but her/she. What should be the correct pronoun? According to me since we are replacing a subject with a pronoun it should be she, but the answer according ...
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2answers
136 views

Is “Me” instead of “I” as a nominative pronoun actually acceptable?

TL;DR; Has 'Me and whoever' long become acceptable usage in informal speech? In the comments on this answer on ELL, I corrected the usage of "me" instead of "I". "My boyfriend and I.. " 😁 ...
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1answer
107 views

Use of don't and doesn't [duplicate]

In the following sentence which is correct, and why? As homeschool moms, we know there (don't/doesn't) seem to be enough hours in the day to tackle all that we want to teach our girls.
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95 views

Is “ran after” a phrasal verb?

I'm having some difficulty parsing this sentence: "The old beggar ran after the rich man." Is the verb "ran" (intransitive) with no object, or is it "ran after" (transitive) with the object ...
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2answers
107 views

Word with -ee as a suffix

Is it correct English to be able to add the suffix -ee on to any verb to show the object of that verb? Ex: Abandonee is "one to whom something is abandoned" Observee is "one who is observed" ...
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2answers
78 views

Direct and indirect objects in the sentences

In the sentence, There is a full moon in the sky. ... will the sky be treated as the object in the sentence?
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1answer
91 views

“He may have been criticized by people who/whom have other opinions” [duplicate]

"He may have been criticized by people who/whom have other opinions" Which is right, who or whom? :)
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6answers
450 views

Is “door” the direct object of “The cat ran out the door”?

My friend and I got into a heated discussion about direct objects. While we both understand what they are and how they work, we got stuck on a random sentence that I blurted out. Now, if I say: ...
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2answers
149 views

“I saw him playing football”

In this sentence, is "playing football" a participle phrase describing the object "him", or is "him playing football" all a gerund phrase functioning as the object? The problem with English grammar ...
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4answers
330 views

Is there an object in this sentence?

You need to practise your proofreading. In this sentence, "you" is the subject and "need" is the verb. But is there an object? At the moment I am guessing that there isn't and that to practise ...
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0answers
109 views

How is this structure named in English grammar? (main clause + object + -ing form)

I've been hearing this sentence structure for a while, so i wanted to learn about it but couldn't find specific information on the internet since i didn't know how this structure was named in English ...
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2answers
210 views

Indirect vs direct object

Consider the two sentences John taught himself calculus. John taught himself. In the first sentence 'himself' is the indirect object and 'calculus' is the direct object. In the second ...
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2answers
324 views

“The sky is blue” - Is it a clause?

In the expression The sky is blue, is the adjective "blue" an object? Is this a clause or a sentence at all?
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3answers
183 views

Clauses in Sentences

I understand that a clause contains (in order) a subject, verb and object, like below: He let his daughter. "He" is the subject, "let" is the verb and "his daughter" is the object. But what ...
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2answers
276 views

“someone or I” and “me or someone”

I have looked at all the related posts but can't find a definite answer for the following question, so try not to dismiss this as answered: "John or I will get back to you later" "Me or John will get ...
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1answer
85 views

The Usage of “ask”

Are the sentences below correct? I asked "Please send me some money." Can you use ask in direct discourse? John: What did you ask Tom? Megan: I asked "leave me alone." Can you omit the ...
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1answer
159 views

To explain or to be explained

I have searched lots of websites to understand which one is correct in this sentence: It is too hard to (be) explain(ed). Some people say that after some adjectives called tough adjectives you ...
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2answers
383 views

Prepositional phrase Vs Direct object

I have seen the rule put forward that We need a direct object to form a passive sentence. The following sentences don't have direct objects according to some schools of thought, they have ...
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2answers
167 views

Yes, this is she. Who's calling? [duplicate]

I've read in a book that I should "use the subjective case if the pronoun is the complement of the linking verb to be". That is the following sentences are correct: They believed that the thief was ...
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1answer
254 views

Is this use of “whom” correct? Can I use “who” here instead?

I want to shorten this: I sent emails to four others. One person responded. Does the following sentence correctly use whom to achieve my goal? I sent emails to four others, one of whom ...
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0answers
58 views

When to use -ed or not as part of objective portion of sentence

Which one of the following usage is correct and why? I would like to have the content changed to the following: ... OR I would like to have the content change to the following: ... The ...
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1answer
132 views

“Whom” or “who” where the referent is both subject and object?

I understand there has been so much on this topic but I am still confused. I get that if the person is the subject it is who and anything else is whom. However, I'm really struggling to work out this ...
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4answers
348 views

What is the general term that describes subjects and objects? (direct, indirect and prepositional objects)

John gave Jack money with enthusiasm. John is the subject, Jack the indirect object, money the direct object, and enthusiasm a prepositional object. Is there a general term that describes the ...
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1answer
199 views

What are the things after prepositions called formally?

I eat rice from a bowl with a spoon. I is the subject. Rice is the object. What are things like bowl and spoon called?
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1answer
284 views

Can a sentence begin with an object or reflexive noun?

I'm writing a function (for a game) which converts a sentence with Spivak pronouns into one with pronouns as specified by a user-selected template. For example, the following input sentence: "E ...
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2answers
417 views

Is it grammatically correct to use “we” or “us” as well as the name of a group? e.g. “A meeting of we employees went very well.”

Is "we + [name of group]" a grammatically correct construction? Example: "A meeting of we employees went very well." Also, what about this: "They gave donuts to us employees at the meeting."
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1answer
243 views

Does one include a comma after the last proposition in a list of multiple preposition-verb pairs

Should I do this: The developers are less experienced in, or passionate about, UX. Or should I remove the last comma: The developers are less experienced in, or passionate about UX. This ...
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1answer
275 views

Correct use of subject/object in sentence?

In the sentence: It is fun to be him/he, would you use him or he? A teacher told me that you use the object form after the infinitive of to be. Is this true?
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2answers
149 views

Should this sentence have a singular or plural object?

Is the correct version this: But in general such verses have rarely been accepted as a genuine part of the book. OR this: But in general such verses have rarely been accepted as genuine ...
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1answer
340 views

Direct and indirect object with the verb “kick” [closed]

Are both theses sentences correct and commonly used: "Kick the ball to me." "Kick me the ball."?
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1answer
61 views

“is to” or “is how to”?

Is it better to say "is to" or "is how to"? For example: A challenging problem is to analyse the runtime effects. or should it be: A challenging problem is how to analyse the runtime ...
1
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1answer
132 views

Can a phrase be the object of a clause and how would its subject change? [duplicate]

Take the sentence: I speak all over to whoever will listen. ...at first blush, I thought, "Ah — whoever should be whomever." However, I then noted that in the phrase "whoever will listen", ...
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4answers
500 views

Does saying “he uses” imply volition?

A recent L.A. Times brief mentioned that the horse California Chrome's qualification for a race was in question because "he uses nasal strips." The phrasing caught my eye because, to me, saying "he ...
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3answers
16k views

Which is the proper response to “I love you”? [closed]

When my wife says I love you, my natural response is you too, meaning “[I love] you too.” I realise that I’m in the minority here. I more frequently hear me too, but I don’t feel comfortable with ...
4
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1answer
427 views

subject + verb + infinitive

I am having difficulty with subject + verb + infinitive set-ups, as I discovered with who/whom sentences. I understand who and whom as the subject and object forms. For sentences that I find a little ...
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3answers
606 views

Is it grammatically sound to group nouns/verbs sharing a preposition that governs the same object using an “and” multiple times in one sentence?

For example, does the following sentence violate any grammar rules? "Global Connections" will be showcasing internship opportunities, job openings and training programs at, challenges and issues ...
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1answer
272 views

Can a clause have more than one (in)direct object?

I am fairly convinced that any English clause (and it probably also counts for other languages, but I can't be sure about that) can only contain 1 subject, 1 direct object, and 1 indirect object. This ...
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1answer
542 views

Problem with choosing between singular and plural nouns

I would like to find out how to use singular and plural nouns correctly. I have tried grammar books, but I can't find anything on agreements of nouns in the object position. Please kindly explain to ...
0
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3answers
91 views

About verbs and their objects [closed]

Some verbs take their object directly, some don't. For example: you bounce into a programmer's cubicle with a huge grin on your face the word "bounce" here cannot have its object, so we have to ...
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1answer
2k views

Comma before “and that” in a compound object

You should have known that he is quite adept at what he does and that he has the best conversion rate. You should have known that he is quite adept at what he does, and that he has the best ...
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4answers
6k views

“That was me” vs. “That was I” [duplicate]

When telling a story about myself from the past, I have found myself in an internal debate over whether the correct way to segue into the present is: That was me twelve years ago. Or: That ...