Questions about the part of speech governed by prepositions and active transitive verbs.

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2
votes
2answers
79 views

“I saw him playing football”

In this sentence, is "playing football" a participle phrase describing the object "him", or is "him playing football" all a gerund phrase functioning as the object? The problem with English grammar ...
3
votes
4answers
102 views

Is there an object in this sentence?

You need to practise your proofreading. In this sentence, "you" is the subject and "need" is the verb. But is there an object? At the moment I am guessing that there isn't and that to practise ...
1
vote
0answers
48 views

How is this structure named in English grammar? (main clause + object + -ing form)

I've been hearing this sentence structure for a while, so i wanted to learn about it but couldn't find specific information on the internet since i didn't know how this structure was named in English ...
4
votes
1answer
45 views

Indirect vs direct object

Consider the two sentences John taught himself calculus. John taught himself. In the first sentence 'himself' is the indirect object and 'calculus' is the direct object. In the second ...
0
votes
2answers
61 views

“The sky is blue” - Is it a clause?

In the expression The sky is blue, is the adjective "blue" an object? Is this a clause or a sentence at all?
2
votes
3answers
92 views

Clauses in Sentences

I understand that a clause contains (in order) a subject, verb and object, like below: He let his daughter. "He" is the subject, "let" is the verb and "his daughter" is the object. But what ...
0
votes
2answers
38 views

“someone or I” and “me or someone”

I have looked at all the related posts but can't find a definite answer for the following question, so try not to dismiss this as answered: "John or I will get back to you later" "Me or John will get ...
2
votes
1answer
57 views

The Usage of “ask”

Are the sentences below correct? I asked "Please send me some money." Can you use ask in direct discourse? John: What did you ask Tom? Megan: I asked "leave me alone." Can you omit the ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

To explain or to be explained

I have searched lots of websites to understand which one is correct in this sentence: It is too hard to (be) explain(ed). Some people say that after some adjectives called tough adjectives you ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Should I use who or whom? [duplicate]

I feel like I know the rule but I'm not sure in this case. "The audience wonders who/whom she is." Which is correct and why? Thanks.
0
votes
2answers
194 views

Prepositional phrase Vs Direct object

I have seen the rule put forward that We need a direct object to form a passive sentence. The following sentences don't have direct objects according to some schools of thought, they have ...
2
votes
2answers
89 views

Yes, this is she. Who's calling? [duplicate]

I've read in a book that I should "use the subjective case if the pronoun is the complement of the linking verb to be". That is the following sentences are correct: They believed that the thief was ...
3
votes
1answer
158 views

Is this use of “whom” correct? Can I use “who” here instead?

I want to shorten this: I sent emails to four others. One person responded. Does the following sentence correctly use whom to achieve my goal? I sent emails to four others, one of whom ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

When to use -ed or not as part of objective portion of sentence

Which one of the following usage is correct and why? I would like to have the content changed to the following: ... OR I would like to have the content change to the following: ... The ...
0
votes
1answer
80 views

“Whom” or “who” where the referent is both subject and object?

I understand there has been so much on this topic but I am still confused. I get that if the person is the subject it is who and anything else is whom. However, I'm really struggling to work out this ...
1
vote
4answers
174 views

What is the general term that describes subjects and objects? (direct, indirect and prepositional objects)

John gave Jack money with enthusiasm. John is the subject, Jack the indirect object, money the direct object, and enthusiasm a prepositional object. Is there a general term that describes the ...
1
vote
1answer
123 views

What are the things after prepositions called formally?

I eat rice from a bowl with a spoon. I is the subject. Rice is the object. What are things like bowl and spoon called?
0
votes
1answer
109 views

Can a sentence begin with an object or reflexive noun?

I'm writing a function (for a game) which converts a sentence with Spivak pronouns into one with pronouns as specified by a user-selected template. For example, the following input sentence: "E ...
2
votes
2answers
116 views

Is it grammatically correct to use “we” or “us” as well as the name of a group? e.g. “A meeting of we employees went very well.”

Is "we + [name of group]" a grammatically correct construction? Example: "A meeting of we employees went very well." Also, what about this: "They gave donuts to us employees at the meeting."
1
vote
1answer
149 views

Does one include a comma after the last proposition in a list of multiple preposition-verb pairs

Should I do this: The developers are less experienced in, or passionate about, UX. Or should I remove the last comma: The developers are less experienced in, or passionate about UX. This ...
0
votes
2answers
164 views

Correct use of subject/object in sentence?

In the sentence: It is fun to be him/he, would you use him or he? A teacher told me that you use the object form after the infinitive of to be. Is this true?
1
vote
2answers
99 views

Should this sentence have a singular or plural object?

Is the correct version this: But in general such verses have rarely been accepted as a genuine part of the book. OR this: But in general such verses have rarely been accepted as genuine ...
0
votes
1answer
192 views

Direct and indirect object with the verb “kick” [closed]

Are both theses sentences correct and commonly used: "Kick the ball to me." "Kick me the ball."?
1
vote
1answer
47 views

“is to” or “is how to”?

Is it better to say "is to" or "is how to"? For example: A challenging problem is to analyse the runtime effects. or should it be: A challenging problem is how to analyse the runtime ...
1
vote
1answer
93 views

Can a phrase be the object of a clause and how would its subject change? [duplicate]

Take the sentence: I speak all over to whoever will listen. ...at first blush, I thought, "Ah — whoever should be whomever." However, I then noted that in the phrase "whoever will listen", ...
6
votes
4answers
434 views

Does saying “he uses” imply volition?

A recent L.A. Times brief mentioned that the horse California Chrome's qualification for a race was in question because "he uses nasal strips." The phrasing caught my eye because, to me, saying "he ...
0
votes
3answers
7k views

Which is the proper response to “I love you”? [closed]

When my wife says I love you, my natural response is you too, meaning “[I love] you too.” I realise that I’m in the minority here. I more frequently hear me too, but I don’t feel comfortable with ...
4
votes
1answer
203 views

subject + verb + infinitive

I am having difficulty with subject + verb + infinitive set-ups, as I discovered with who/whom sentences. I understand who and whom as the subject and object forms. For sentences that I find a little ...
-1
votes
3answers
420 views

Is it grammatically sound to group nouns/verbs sharing a preposition that governs the same object using an “and” multiple times in one sentence?

For example, does the following sentence violate any grammar rules? "Global Connections" will be showcasing internship opportunities, job openings and training programs at, challenges and issues ...
2
votes
1answer
154 views

Can a clause have more than one (in)direct object?

I am fairly convinced that any English clause (and it probably also counts for other languages, but I can't be sure about that) can only contain 1 subject, 1 direct object, and 1 indirect object. This ...
1
vote
1answer
345 views

Problem with choosing between singular and plural nouns

I would like to find out how to use singular and plural nouns correctly. I have tried grammar books, but I can't find anything on agreements of nouns in the object position. Please kindly explain to ...
0
votes
3answers
80 views

About verbs and their objects [closed]

Some verbs take their object directly, some don't. For example: you bounce into a programmer's cubicle with a huge grin on your face the word "bounce" here cannot have its object, so we have to ...
2
votes
1answer
946 views

Comma before “and that” in a compound object

You should have known that he is quite adept at what he does and that he has the best conversion rate. You should have known that he is quite adept at what he does, and that he has the best ...
10
votes
4answers
3k views

“That was me” vs. “That was I” [duplicate]

When telling a story about myself from the past, I have found myself in an internal debate over whether the correct way to segue into the present is: That was me twelve years ago. Or: That ...
6
votes
1answer
697 views

What happened first: “ye”/“you” merging to “you”, or “thou”/“thee” falling ou of common use?

Simple subject "I": I went. Replacing it with "me": Me went. That sounds strikingly wrong. We use it for fake "caveman talk". However, there was a time when it worked like this: 1st ...
1
vote
1answer
731 views

“Take something into account” vs “Take into account something” — are both correct?

Are the two usages both correct? Personally, I'd prefer take something into account but I have heard some professors and academic textbook authors prefer take into account something. ...
1
vote
2answers
464 views

What is the noun to describe whether a word is subject or object?

Just as "number" describes whether a noun is singular or plural, is there a noun that describes whether a pronoun is subject or object? For example: The number of the first-person pronoun "I" is ...
2
votes
3answers
222 views

Is it acceptable to use “to be” to describe possession?

I recently was explaining a couple of Marathi phrases to my friend, and I realized that the language doesn't have the word "to have". We have multiple different ways of expressing posession, but I ...
0
votes
2answers
149 views

Whom vs Who: object Judas + whom [duplicate]

The test itself lies in attempting to apply this new update to a card belonging to Judas, whom is a legitimate user of the system. Is Judas considered the subject or the object? I'm considering ...
1
vote
1answer
82 views

“Hundreds of applicants” vs “hundreds of resumes”

When I am referring to a number of job applicants, I might say, "I've got a hundred qualified applicants in this folder"; when what I mean is, "I've got RESUMES from a hundred qualified applicants in ...
2
votes
1answer
123 views

Sentence fragment: subject or object

Suppose I have a picture of me hanging out with Bob, and I want to add a caption to it. Is one of the following more correct than the other? "Bob and me" "Bob and I" More generally, do grammar ...
1
vote
2answers
276 views

objective/subjective pronouns following a verb and before another verb

A grammar exercise says that this is correct: "The final choice made Heather and I change our decision." Why is the pronoun "I" correct when, if you dropped "Heather and" and changed "our" to "my" ...
2
votes
1answer
350 views

Predicate inner components in sentence (object without determiner)

I'm working on a computer program that might output the following sentence: Analyst Mark Mahaney upgraded rating on Apple to Buy Is that sentence valid in English? (That is, nothing betwen the ...
1
vote
3answers
627 views

Subject and Object in Commands?

I'm having difficulty figuring out the subject and object in the following sentence: Give me that pencil. The confusion is since someone is requesting the pencil, should they be the subject? In ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Direct object and indirect object in the sentence “Bill promised Mary to fix her car.”

In the following sentence Bill promised Mary to fix her car. Maybe I can write this sentence like this: Bill promised Mary (for Bill) to fix her car. Bill is the subject of the verb fix, ...
3
votes
4answers
646 views

The object of “I don't like people telling me what to do”?

In the sentences I don't like people telling me what to do. I'm fed up with you telling me what to do. What are the objects of like and with? Is it "people" or "people telling me what to do" ...
-1
votes
1answer
772 views

Correct use of “happen”

A friend of mine told me that the following sentence is incorrect (copied from an exercise) Do all sentences tell us what the speaker would like to happen? He claims that it should read: Do ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

Object complement adjective, or direct object, or?

Jill painted the kitchen rosey red. In this sentence, would red be considered an object complement adjective? If so, what do I do with rosey, since I cannot have an adjective modifying another ...
14
votes
5answers
1k views

Can the verb “wonder” simply take an object?

In this question, the questioner states I wonder the origin of the word. Can wonder take a simple object like that? Or should it be wonder about or wonder at or something similar (or something ...
-1
votes
2answers
834 views

Identify the subject, object and verb

In the sentence below I want to confirm whether I have correctly identified the subject, object and the verb (It's a sentence I made up as an example and hope it's correct, and if not please correct ...