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22 views

What is the nuance difference between “yourself” and “your way”? [migrated]

What is the nuance difference between "Eat yourself healthy" and "Eat your way healthy"? (I tried first searching on Google, but I cannot find a similar question, and comparing "yourself" and "your ...
-1
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1answer
34 views

Proper Email Salutations to a group [closed]

Is it inappropriate to use the salutation "Ladies" when referring to a group 5 women in an email? I was told the term could be offensive to women. Is this true? I usually use the term "Folks" when ...
0
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0answers
31 views

“Occurs to me” or “Occurred to me”? [migrated]

The question is in the title. Which one is correct? And if they're both correct, how do they differ? Especially when you're teaching a concept and say: The first thing that "occurs to me" is... ...
0
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0answers
21 views

“how” vs. “just how”

How does the nuance of the following sentence change with and without the word “just”? That accident is a reminder of just how quickly life can change. Somehow I would automatically put in “just,...
2
votes
2answers
92 views

Distinguish twins vs distinguish between twins

I'm confused about the use of the word "Distinguish". The link shows an example sentence where the verb is used as an intransitive verb: Can the child distinguish between right and wrong? But I ...
2
votes
1answer
29 views

in pursuit of / through a pursuit of

Do those expressions have some different nuance and grammatically correct? I have seen "in pursuit of" many times but rarely seen "through a pursuit of" which one would be more proper for the ...
-1
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1answer
75 views

Why does “Recreational” have two definitions?

1. of or relating to recreation : recreational facilities in the park. 2. (of a drug or medication) used for recreation and enjoyment rather than to treat a medical condition: recreational drugs such ...
0
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1answer
86 views

intention vs. purpose

Oxford Dictionaries define the nouns as intention A thing intended; an aim or plan purpose The reason for which something is done or created or for which something exists So which sentence ...
2
votes
1answer
119 views

What is the difference between “intermediate” and “intermediary” when both mean the same thing? [closed]

I have a tendency to say This case is intermediary This case is an intermediate one This is an intermediate case I probably would stumble over This is an intermediary case ...
0
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2answers
35 views

“High-paying occupation” vs “high-paying job or position”

I am a beginner of English and my native language is Chinese. I just wonder why I can't use high-paying occupation? My teacher suggests that using high-paying job or position is much more ...
0
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2answers
56 views

Meaning of “mechanistically-motivated”

While I was reading a paper, I found "mechanistically-motivated." We use our models to suggest mechanistically-motivated ways of comparing models. Because English is my second language, I don'...
3
votes
1answer
155 views

What do you think when these words come up: “populace”, “population”, “people”, the “mass”, the “public” [closed]

When would be the best usage of those words? When do we do/don't use it? What is the message conveyed when we use Populace/Population; People/Mass; Mass/Public? 1.Populace vs Population 2.People vs ...
3
votes
5answers
112 views

John's quite a hero versus John's quite the hero

I am a native British English speaker. I know how and when to use the following expressions. However I am finding it difficult to explain the difference. John's quite a hero. John's quite the ...
2
votes
2answers
165 views

Difference between “irascible”, “fractious”, “irritable” and “atrabilious”?

It seems that they can all mean "easily provoked to anger" irascible:Easily provoked to outbursts of anger; irritable. fractious:Irritable; argumentative; quarrelsome. irritable:1.Capable of being ...
4
votes
3answers
551 views

Difference of “I am just an ABC” vs “I am but a XYZ”

As far as I (non-native speaker) can tell, these two sentences have the same meaning: I'm just a humble merchant I'm but a humble merchant However I wonder if there is some subtle ...
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3answers
17k views

Good Luck **in** all your endeavors' versus Good Luck **to** all your endeavors'

What is the difference between 'I am currently busy with family stuff so I really don't know when is a good time to catch up. Good Luck in all your endeavors' versus 'I am currently busy with ...
0
votes
2answers
61 views

Does the past participle always imply that an object was, at some point, not in its current state? [closed]

When someone says This is a dried handkerchief It is usually implying that, at one point, the handkerchief was not dry. However, does this apply to all past participles? If I say : I ...
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votes
10answers
5k views

A hypernym for 'insects', 'worms' and the like

From Oxford: insect: any small creature with six legs and a body divided into three parts. Insects usually also have wings. Ants, bees and flies are all insects Insect is often used to refer ...
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1answer
48 views

“In” and “and” when describing a relation

I recently noticed this in various titles of things (books, articles, etc.): Language and the brain Technology and society These make sense and are grammatical, but why not use in in ...
1
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1answer
324 views

Nuances for 'craving'

Consider the following sentences: 1a) I crave solitude. 1b) I crave for solitude. 2a) I miss home-cooked food. I crave it. 2b) I miss home-cooked food. I crave for it. Oxford ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the difference between “You are looking well” and “You look well”?

What is the difference between: You're looking well! and You look well! Assuming that both refer to a specific occasion, what is it that the continuous aspect indicates here? The ...
1
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0answers
217 views

Is there a nuance in meaning between 'non-managed' and 'unmanaged'?

Context: I am writing about 'devices not managed by professionals' and debating the subtleties between non-managed devices vs. unmanaged devices
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1answer
1k views

“Put on a show” vs. “put on an act”. What's the difference?

What's the difference between "put on a show" and "put on an act"? Are they interchangeable? They look similar in meaning to me. Is there any nuanced difference? Examples sentences from dictionaries:...
0
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0answers
36 views

“data on my iPad” or “data in my iPad” [duplicate]

Which is correct and are there any differences in meaning or nuance? I have the data on my iPad I have the data in my iPad I searched data on my iPad and data in my iPad on google, and got many ...
0
votes
2answers
177 views

What is the difference between “at least as surprising as” and “more surprising than”?

According to Wikipedia, P value is defined as the probability that data at least as surprising as the observed sample results would be generated under a model of random chance Why is it stated ...
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4answers
1k views

“lending support” vs “extending support”

I am in a little debate with myself, arguing the difference between "lending support" and "extending support" while trying to write a diplomatic email. So some people got promoted into highly ...
0
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1answer
389 views

How to avoid using redundant words like “not so”, “quite” or “sort of”?

Today I find an interesting table in Writers Write: I wonder do we have the same table, but for the words "not so", "quite", "sort of", etc?
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votes
3answers
2k views

Uniqueness vs. Unicity

Uniqueness and unicity can be synonyms when they are used to describe something that is “unique”, meaning something that is distinct from all other things. Are these terms interchangeable, or do they ...
2
votes
2answers
258 views

‘Imbibe’ — What does it look like?

I’m trying to determine the visual expression of ‘imbibing,’ with the presumption it describes a particular attitude or energy in the act of drinking. (I make this presumption because it gives reason ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Difference between “forget about it” and “forget it”

It seems they both mean never mind in the following examples: Sorry for what happened yesterday Forget it. or Can I buy you a drink? Forget about it. What are the differences between ...
1
vote
2answers
109 views

Is “Perl Monger” derogatory when used by non Perl programmers? [closed]

The two most common uses of the word "monger" I've heard of are rather derogatory: whore-monger and warmonger. Wiktionary reflects this in its second definition: A person promoting something ...
5
votes
2answers
540 views

What is the meaning of “What a box to sweat in!”?

I have started to read "The Sun Also Rises" by Ernest Hemingway. I stumbled a lot shortly after the beginning, as I'm a middle-aged Japanese dude who is struggling to learn English. I need someone's ...
0
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1answer
336 views

“Can” vs “Able to”: People/Animals vs. Inanimate Objects

I’m wondering if the English grammar “rule” given below, which I have heard from numerous non-native speakers, has any validity. “can” is used for people, animals, and inanimate objects. “...
2
votes
1answer
138 views

How to translate the German term “Selbstverständnis” with respect to organisations?

The German term "Selbstverständnis" can be used in the context of (typically) not-for-profit / non-profit organisations to denote the aims they have and the (typically social) changes they try to ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Larger organization – usage

What would be the correct verbiage for referring to an outside organization? For example: “Your team provided an opportunity for this division to derive change within our larger organization”
4
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2answers
1k views

Is there a neutral word for an olfactory impression?

While creating this proposal I was struggling to find the right words for olfactory impressions. Is there a neutral word for an olfactory impression? smell seems to have a negative connotation ...
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2answers
89 views

'Closest Healing' or another phrase for a book title?

I have written a book and will publish it. I have suffered a lot from a disease over a decade, but after I prayed to God in fasting I found its healing was very close, not far from me. Therefore, I ...
0
votes
3answers
5k views

A lot of people seem to be 'working for the man'. Who is this guy? [closed]

I have heard the expression 'working for the man' a lot. Mostly in podcasts made in the US. What does that mean? Does it express an opinion about the employer? Something along the lines of big, ...
1
vote
1answer
591 views

“The key doesn't work” vs. “The key is not working” [closed]

Here's a situation. You go to your hotel room and the key that you have is not working. When you go back to the reception, should you say: The key is not working, can you fix it. Or The key ...
3
votes
1answer
696 views

difference between suffixes '-ish' and '-y'

Recently Prince Charles used the word 'Hitlery,' in the sense of "possessing some properties of Hitler." Is there any difference between the suffixes -ish and -y ?
5
votes
1answer
126 views

Must cookies contain chocolate in BrE?

In British English, my friend informed me that my use of the word cookie was incorrect in referring to a baked item having no chocolate bits in it. Instead the appropriate term would have to be ...
2
votes
1answer
124 views

Nuance of “Intellectual Bad Ass” [closed]

To me as a non-native to the English language, it reminds funny, geeky, nerdy hero, like Tony Stark (Iron Man) excluding his riches and Iron Man suit. But what are the nuances of "intellectual bad ...
3
votes
2answers
334 views

Connotation of term autodidact

I would like to know if autodidact has a positive, negative, or neutral connotation behind it. These questions asking about usage imply: A neutral connotation: Autodidactic as a Verb What would ...
1
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1answer
62 views

Difference between “in” and “to” in this context

My friend is taking an English conversation class. In it, she said I have been teaching math in high schools for more than 10 years. Before that I taught math in junior high schools. However, ...
1
vote
3answers
29k views

“Given that” vs. “Granted that”

Understanding that "given that" and "granted that" are both used to mark the premise of an argument (or conditions that are assumed to be true), and the actual meaning is almost identical, I have to ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

any differences between fund and funding when used as a noun?

Are there any differences between fund and funding when used as a noun? They seem both to have a meaning of "money made available for a particular purpose", and I was wondering why we need "funding" ...
1
vote
1answer
159 views

PrP Continuous vs. PrP | Nuance?

I have a question regarding the usage of the Present Perfect and the Present Perfect Continuous. So first, here's the context: I was playing an online game with a couple friends and in this game you ...
0
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3answers
214 views

Why use “what is … to/by me” rather than “my … thing”?

I noticed that in English we say, "My favorite thing", and it's okay, but we don't say, "My well-liked thing". Why is this? Why use, "What is well-liked by me ..."?
2
votes
1answer
222 views

What’s the difference between “kerfuffle”, “commotion”, and “fuss”?

What’s the difference between kerfuffle, commotion, and fuss? For example: What’s all this kerfuffle about? What’s all this commotion about? What’s all this fuss about?
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1answer
14k views

“the very best” vs. “by far the best” vs. “much the best”

What does the following sentence exactly mean? He is the very best student in our class. Is it any different in meaning from the following? He is by far the best student in our class. ...