Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept.

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Noun form for “despise”

What would the noun form for despise be? My current two ideas are despite and derision. According to Google, the etymology of despite is Middle English (originally used as a noun meaning ...
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365 views

“Code of Alabama” usage in this sentence

From Harper Lee’s 1960 novel, To Kill a Mockingbird: Atticus’s office in the courthouse contained little more than a hat rack, a spittoon, a checkerboard and an unsullied Code of Alabama. Isn’t ...
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A word for how much of a sales target has been acomplished

Imagine the user interface of a sales commission management system. You have clearly labeled Goal showing the amount in sales the sales representative has to sell in order to reach it. Then there is ...
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25 views

Name of a specific room in radiology department in hospital where doctors write images' descriptions

What is the proper name (if there is any) of the room where doctors write descriptions of various radiology images. This room typically has a bit different light, some special grey-scale-only-monitors ...
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40 views

“Singular” vs “Uncountable” nouns

Today, searching for the term "cloak", I came across these definitions From Longman DOCE 5th Ed. cloak noun [singular] an organization, activity, or way of behaving that deliberately protects ...
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95 views

order or adjuncts and adjectives

The more thought I give about the order of adjuncts and adjectives before a noun, the less sense it all makes. Not a native speaker, but using English on a daily basis. For instance, in "Relational ...
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22 views

Same theme pictures( or paintings) merged

Is there an english word (substantive) that refers to a type of picture or painting where there are merged lot of pieces of a same theme? So far I found 'mural' and 'collage', but not sure if they ...
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30 views

What does the word 'candle-skin' mean?

In the book Cider with Rosie, an autobiographical coming-of-age novel written by British author Laurie Lee and published in 1959, I find the word 'candle-skin', which I tried to look up in many online ...
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25 views

How do I choose between a noun and a participle when picking one to use as an adjective?

I know that I can use both a noun and a particle as an adjective but what do I have to ask myself when choosing between them? For instance: Talking points, talk points Information ...
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47 views

is this a regular noun?

In the following sentence do we presume that the word doctor ought to be treated as a regular noun, or should it begin with a capital letter? The doctor will see you now.
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183 views

Is fever a countable or uncountable noun?

I have some difficulties in using the noun 'fever'. Is it countable or uncountable? Is it correct to say "They have fevers."?
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Nouns denoting a state and the point of its initiation

The word incarnation, according to Webster, has two meanings: 1) the act of incarnating 2) the state of being incarnate So, this word can denote a state, as well as the moment of initiation of that ...
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149 views

What types of words/phrases are “this” “here” & “they”?

I'm currently doing an analytic essay on my drama coursework (fun.). I'd like to explain how the playwright never reveals the exact setting of the act, by using only phrases such as "this","here", and ...
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104 views

Can “safer” be used as a noun?

The word "safer" can refer to several different meanings such as well-being, which would usually be placed as an adjective. It is similarly associated with being cautious, trustworthy, or reliable as ...
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298 views

Can you call someone a “leaf blower” without being offensive?

I understand that a leaf blower is the equipment you use to blow leaves. Can you also call the person who uses such an equipment a leaf blower, too? It seems that a "leaf blower" is used sometimes ...
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48 views

word for a condescending, snarky, yet awkward and jealous, person

i'm looking for a word for a person who is cynical, judgmental, nitpicking, condescending but also flawed, gawky and timid (in an unfamiliar setting), and is harboring some kind of jealousy towards ...
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26 views

Noun for someone who puts others down to strive

These are people you may even be friends with who make you feel like doo doo because they always have to one-up you. I know so many of them but I don't have a word to describe it. It's like they're ...
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21 views

What is a noun derivative from a verb when being used in an assignment context?

I'm trying to find a noun that can only be derived only from a verb and is assigned as a role. E.g. in the following sentence: Fred assesses the test. Jack runs over the hill. Billy ...
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Advice vs. Suggestion Why is the latter countable?

From an outsider, I think advice and suggestion have similar meanings. But I don't understand why the noun suggestion is countable whereas advice isn't. We can ask: Can you give me two or ...
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69 views

Difference between 'gain optimization' and 'gains optimization'

What is the difference between gain optimization and gains optimization in a financial context? I want to know in particular if one of those terms is better English, or if they have different ...
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39 views

When a title is used as a common noun, should it be capitalised?

In the company I work for, we have a process called an Engineering Request, the document produced as a result of following the process is also referred to as an Engineering Request. Typically, it's ...
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76 views

When did 'street', 'road', etc. start being capitalised?

Old newspapers and books seem to very rarely capitalise (and often hyphenate) phrases like "High street", "Herbert-road", and "Trusting lane". These days, we capitalise "Street", "Road", and "Lane". ...
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Can I use the plural form when stating the possession of just one item?

If I want to say I have something without emphasis on the quantity, are both of these sentences ok? I have an apple. I have apples. (I may just have one apple.)
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When do you link composite words with dashes? (compounds)

In German (my mother tongue) it is very common to combine several nouns into a new word by linking them together with dashes. After a word has been established in German, you even see it getting ...
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41 views

What is a word for loving sadness?

I need a word for a love of sadness. A quote from Because of Winn-Dixie, for the feel. "Melancholy," I repeated. I liked the way it sounded, like there was music hidden somewhere inside it. (Kate ...
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Is it “Click option Yes; Click button Proceed or ”Click the option Yes; Click the button Proceed"

It's clear that we need an article in cases like these: Click the X option, Click the Y button. But do you write an article in cases where the proper noun follows the regular noun: Click **the** ...
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40 views

Gerund vs noun— which to use in title

This issue of gerunds vs noun always puzzled me and in this particular case made me wonder. I actually am translating my thesis title into English and am not sure as to use gerund or noun. So which ...
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Need help with formation of this title

I am going to write my bachelor paper about how I am going to extend CASE tool transformation of integrity constrains from logical model to physical schema. I am not sure if it is relevant, but my ...
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58 views

Has or have confusion when we don't use does

I got a list of votes from many people on Google. The topic is: Anyone have any ideas? OR Anyone has any ideas? I believe that it is 'Anyone have any any ideas' for we don't use does. But ...
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68 views

In the sentence “We do have free will.”, what does “free” stands for?

In this sentence "We do have free will.", is "free-will" a compound noun? And if so, is "free" an adjective? Edit I'm talking about the theological concept of "free will". Which, in some cases, you ...
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71 views

Height and Tallness

We use the words "tall" and "high" to mean different things. A dwarf on top of a mountain is high but not tall. A professional basketball player in Death Valley is tall but not high. Note: I am ...
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32 views

“the rustle of tires” vs “the rustling of tires”: pompous or not, is there a rule, or is it random?

Scene: high school. Time: the present. A teacher went through a student's essay in which an out-of-the-way house in the sticks was described. It (the house) sat in the middle of a picturesque grove, ...
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which word gives emphasis to other word

If A-cum-B denotes that, A and B are similar standing Which word describes B has having greater significance than A? For example : Accounts cum Finance means - both accounts and finance are of ...
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66 views

Should I use singlar noun or plural noun (Phone or phones)

I have some difficulties when I want to talk with a group of people in using nouns. Should I use all nouns in plural form? For example, when I am talking to a group of students and want to teach them ...
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317 views

“Fodder” meaning “useless chatter”?

Is there a usage of the word fodder that means "useless chatter"? I have used it this way in the past but can't find it referenced that way currently.
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40 views

Can you maintain a consideration?

More than 1 person has stumbled on this line in a draft report here: "...such that the considerations outlined in Section 1.2 are maintained" Can you maintain a consideration? Yes, the ...
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273 views

Which one is correct “ students' birthday or students' birthdays ”?

I know that children is a plural noun and birthday is a countable noun but I see a sentence in a book " children have a birthday cake at their birthday ". Why is children which is a plural noun ...
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39 views

When is it okay to begin an substantive appositive with a noun?

This sentence sounds quite incorrect: The Bahamas, series of islands surrounding the USA, are beneficial to China's economy. It seems that we need an article after the first comma; a quantifier ...
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76 views

Is there a term for nouns that describe the performance of a verb?

There are nouns that describe the performance of, or ability to perform a verb? E.g. perception / perceive communication / communicate collaboration / collaborate Is there a term for these nouns ...
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Can one say that “sythesization is the process of creating a synthesis”

Synthesize is the verb form of synthesis. That is "to create a synthesis". Is it possible to create a noun again from Synthesize to name the process rather than the product.
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279 views

Words that act as both noun and verb

Can all the verbs act as noun and vice versa ?
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94 views

How can nouns be used to modify adjectives?

I know you can "as a " after an adjective. Is there a way to use the noun like an adverb? My logic tells me that I'd need to add a suffix to make it an adjective ("-like", "-ish"). Then, I'd need ...
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86 views

Should a noun come before or after someone's name?

How can I use a noun as an adjective before a name? Would it be Publisher Jack or Jack Publisher?
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57 views

A synonym for the prefix intro~

Good afternoon, While working on a philosophical paper I came across a slight problem and while I searched for an answer on my own, I seem predisposed to not find any, at least not in the sense of an ...
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65 views

What is special about Anglo-French legal usage of [the] infinitive as a noun?

I was reading the etymology of attainder (n.), when I saw its reference to: use of French infinitives as nouns, especially in legal language, see waiver. waiver (n.) [<--] [...] Other ...
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77 views

Use of collective nouns and verbs

I see the British normally use plural form of the verbs associated with collective nouns. An example, "The team have fired its coach" versus "The team has fired its coach". I have been told this is ...
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35 views

Modifying noun after noun?

At first I wrote When executing a read(v) operation, the state machines exchange optimistic state. I know that is correct, but I wonder if the following would also be acceptable in a technical ...
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Receiver of a shared file

What noun describes the person that is the receiver of a shared item? The person that shares the item is the "Sharer", the receiver is the "Sharee"? (I know I can't use this word, it means something ...
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71 views

Why some verbs have their nouns form exactly like them while the others are not?

From the “Start from the beginning” vs “begin from the starting” question in ell.SE, user δοῦλος has explained that the noun form of begin is beginning, while the noun form of start is still start. ...
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How do I use “worth” here? Help me, pleaseee

I don't know how to use "worth" here, "if you really like, it's worth it" Is it correct? Thank you!