Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept.

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Noun form for “despise”

What would the noun form for despise be? My current two ideas are despite and derision. According to Google, the etymology of despite is Middle English (originally used as a noun meaning ‘...
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64 views

A word for how much of a sales target has been acomplished

Imagine the user interface of a sales commission management system. You have clearly labeled Goal showing the amount in sales the sales representative has to sell in order to reach it. Then there is ...
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426 views

“Code of Alabama” usage in this sentence

From Harper Lee’s 1960 novel, To Kill a Mockingbird: Atticus’s office in the courthouse contained little more than a hat rack, a spittoon, a checkerboard and an unsullied Code of Alabama. Isn’t ...
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52 views

What do you call a noun unconventionally acting as a verb?

When one uses a verb as a noun, we call that a gerund (e.g. "I love running."). However, what would we call a noun that's unconventionally being used as a verb? (e.g. "I'm going to go math.", instead ...
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25 views

Usage of “representation” in the sense of being part of a group

Is the following sentence correct and clear? "Elite universities in England are under constant scrutiny because of the low representation of certain population groups, particularly state-school ...
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96 views

order or adjuncts and adjectives

The more thought I give about the order of adjuncts and adjectives before a noun, the less sense it all makes. Not a native speaker, but using English on a daily basis. For instance, in "Relational ...
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41 views

In terms of poetry, what is the Thomas code?

I was reading a book review of Wittgenstein's Mistress on goodreads, and I came across the sentence, "Without such accessible lecture notes, I may not have ever cracked the Thomas code and may never ...
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20 views

Nouns and Gerunds

Why does it sound 'right' to say - "Enjoy your reading", "Enjoy your fishing", "Enjoy your hunting" - but 'wrong' to say - "Enjoy your eating", "Enjoy your sleeping" ? Thanks in advance for the help.
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29 views

Noun for someone who puts others down to strive

These are people you may even be friends with who make you feel like doo doo because they always have to one-up you. I know so many of them but I don't have a word to describe it. It's like they're ...
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25 views

What is a noun derivative from a verb when being used in an assignment context?

I'm trying to find a noun that can only be derived only from a verb and is assigned as a role. E.g. in the following sentence: Fred assesses the test. Jack runs over the hill. Billy ...
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74 views

Advice vs. Suggestion Why is the latter countable?

From an outsider, I think advice and suggestion have similar meanings. But I don't understand why the noun suggestion is countable whereas advice isn't. We can ask: Can you give me two or ...
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69 views

Difference between 'gain optimization' and 'gains optimization'

What is the difference between gain optimization and gains optimization in a financial context? I want to know in particular if one of those terms is better English, or if they have different ...
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39 views

When a title is used as a common noun, should it be capitalised?

In the company I work for, we have a process called an Engineering Request, the document produced as a result of following the process is also referred to as an Engineering Request. Typically, it's ...
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81 views

When did 'street', 'road', etc. start being capitalised?

Old newspapers and books seem to very rarely capitalise (and often hyphenate) phrases like "High street", "Herbert-road", and "Trusting lane". These days, we capitalise "Street", "Road", and "Lane". ...
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92 views

Can I use the plural form when stating the possession of just one item?

If I want to say I have something without emphasis on the quantity, are both of these sentences ok? I have an apple. I have apples. (I may just have one apple.)
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7 views

“Shipping cost” or “shipping price”?

While building an ecommerce website, I'm writing the labels for the checkout process. I'd like to use the words “price” and “cost” correctly (I understand that a product on the shelf has a price, but ...
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23 views

Multiple nouns and genitive - how to tell whether it applies to all or just the last one?

Having the following definition, as a non-native speaker I find it difficult to tell its correct meaning. A planned and systematic means for assuring management that the defined standards, ...
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32 views

What is the classifying noun for a person who is both a project term member and a consumer of the final product?

In a scenario where, two people, say a capenter and a plumber, are both working on a shopping mall construction project. The carpenter, lives in a foreign land, will return home when her direct ...
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24 views

How to name on sort project by

I have a list of art and design project I do, some is for client (pay) , some is not (without pay): not start from client invite (like redesign a product exist, concept, or art ... ), or client not ...
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100 views

What is the origin of the word 'aphotic'? Is there a noun meaning “the state of being aphotic”?

Some adjectives ending in -ic are derived from nouns. For example, hyperbolic is derived from hyperbole, and parabolic is derived from parabola. Aphotic is an adjective meaning "lightless; dark" (...
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30 views

Indefinite article with an abstract noun

I can't get how to use indefinite article with an abstract noun. I often see constructions like this one: indefinite article + adjective + abstract noun. I mean are there any rules when to use or not ...
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17 views

Using “One of the” with “Equipment” or similar mass nouns

As the question has stated, I am having a mild confusion regarding the mass nouns. Is: "Every equipment" correct? The same goes with "One of the equipment". Thank you very much.
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What do you call those small wooden footbridges over water?

Those planks or bamboo bridges you see in some resorts and some sea settlements in Asia?
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While all states face similar industrial waste problems

While all states face similar industrial waste problems, the predominating industries and the regulatory environment of the states obviously determines the types and amounts of waste produced, as well ...
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20 views

Is it prefered to use the noun repeatedly in a sentence, or should I refer to it as “it”. (like I just did)

For example, When I got to the store, the store was closed. When I got to the store, it was closed. Or I took a big gulp of water from my bottle, the water was cold in my mouth. I ...
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When do you link composite words with dashes? (compounds)

In German (my mother tongue) it is very common to combine several nouns into a new word by linking them together with dashes. After a word has been established in German, you even see it getting ...
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53 views

What is a word for loving sadness?

I need a word for a love of sadness. A quote from Because of Winn-Dixie, for the feel. "Melancholy," I repeated. I liked the way it sounded, like there was music hidden somewhere inside it. (Kate ...
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27 views

Is it “Click option Yes; Click button Proceed or ”Click the option Yes; Click the button Proceed"

It's clear that we need an article in cases like these: Click the X option, Click the Y button. But do you write an article in cases where the proper noun follows the regular noun: Click **the** ...
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53 views

Gerund vs noun— which to use in title

This issue of gerunds vs noun always puzzled me and in this particular case made me wonder. I actually am translating my thesis title into English and am not sure as to use gerund or noun. So which ...
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40 views

Need help with formation of this title

I am going to write my bachelor paper about how I am going to extend CASE tool transformation of integrity constrains from logical model to physical schema. I am not sure if it is relevant, but my ...
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61 views

Has or have confusion when we don't use does

I got a list of votes from many people on Google. The topic is: Anyone have any ideas? OR Anyone has any ideas? I believe that it is 'Anyone have any any ideas' for we don't use does. But ...
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88 views

Height and Tallness

We use the words "tall" and "high" to mean different things. A dwarf on top of a mountain is high but not tall. A professional basketball player in Death Valley is tall but not high. Note: I am ...
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“the rustle of tires” vs “the rustling of tires”: pompous or not, is there a rule, or is it random?

Scene: high school. Time: the present. A teacher went through a student's essay in which an out-of-the-way house in the sticks was described. It (the house) sat in the middle of a picturesque grove, ...
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32 views

which word gives emphasis to other word

If A-cum-B denotes that, A and B are similar standing Which word describes B has having greater significance than A? For example : Accounts cum Finance means - both accounts and finance are of ...
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80 views

Should I use singlar noun or plural noun (Phone or phones)

I have some difficulties when I want to talk with a group of people in using nouns. Should I use all nouns in plural form? For example, when I am talking to a group of students and want to teach them ...
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448 views

“Fodder” meaning “useless chatter”?

Is there a usage of the word fodder that means "useless chatter"? I have used it this way in the past but can't find it referenced that way currently.
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40 views

Can you maintain a consideration?

More than 1 person has stumbled on this line in a draft report here: "...such that the considerations outlined in Section 1.2 are maintained" Can you maintain a consideration? Yes, the ...
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425 views

Which one is correct “ students' birthday or students' birthdays ”?

I know that children is a plural noun and birthday is a countable noun but I see a sentence in a book " children have a birthday cake at their birthday ". Why is children which is a plural noun ...
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40 views

When is it okay to begin an substantive appositive with a noun?

This sentence sounds quite incorrect: The Bahamas, series of islands surrounding the USA, are beneficial to China's economy. It seems that we need an article after the first comma; a quantifier ...
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90 views

Is there a term for nouns that describe the performance of a verb?

There are nouns that describe the performance of, or ability to perform a verb? E.g. perception / perceive communication / communicate collaboration / collaborate Is there a term for these nouns ...
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Can one say that “sythesization is the process of creating a synthesis”

Synthesize is the verb form of synthesis. That is "to create a synthesis". Is it possible to create a noun again from Synthesize to name the process rather than the product.
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290 views

Words that act as both noun and verb

Can all the verbs act as noun and vice versa ?
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95 views

How can nouns be used to modify adjectives?

I know you can "as a " after an adjective. Is there a way to use the noun like an adverb? My logic tells me that I'd need to add a suffix to make it an adjective ("-like", "-ish"). Then, I'd need ...
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A synonym for the prefix intro~

Good afternoon, While working on a philosophical paper I came across a slight problem and while I searched for an answer on my own, I seem predisposed to not find any, at least not in the sense of an ...
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67 views

What is special about Anglo-French legal usage of [the] infinitive as a noun?

I was reading the etymology of attainder (n.), when I saw its reference to: use of French infinitives as nouns, especially in legal language, see waiver. waiver (n.) [<--] [...] Other ...
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80 views

Use of collective nouns and verbs

I see the British normally use plural form of the verbs associated with collective nouns. An example, "The team have fired its coach" versus "The team has fired its coach". I have been told this is ...
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35 views

Modifying noun after noun?

At first I wrote When executing a read(v) operation, the state machines exchange optimistic state. I know that is correct, but I wonder if the following would also be acceptable in a technical ...
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Receiver of a shared file

What noun describes the person that is the receiver of a shared item? The person that shares the item is the "Sharer", the receiver is the "Sharee"? (I know I can't use this word, it means something ...
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77 views

Why some verbs have their nouns form exactly like them while the others are not?

From the “Start from the beginning” vs “begin from the starting” question in ell.SE, user δοῦλος has explained that the noun form of begin is beginning, while the noun form of start is still start. ...
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61 views

How do I use “worth” here? Help me, pleaseee

I don't know how to use "worth" here, "if you really like, it's worth it" Is it correct? Thank you!