Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept.

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What should I call a person from New Zealand?

The question “They are Australian” vs “They are Australians” on English Language Learners made me think of what people from New Zealand should be called. With Australian people it's quite clear, you ...
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Common Noun vs Proper Noun

I'm proofing language for a proposed statute change and am confused about whether or not the word Program needs to be capitalized throughout the document. Lots of questions... A Health Professionals ...
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What is “school annex”? [on hold]

Could you please explain what does the following expression mean: school annex I saw a building with this title on the front. However, I cannot figure out what it is exactly, and how does it ...
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Are nouns used in “Types of <noun>(s)” singular or plural?

Take for example the word "liquid", which can be both uncountable and countable. Should it be - Types of liquid (There are many different types of liquid.) or Types of liquids? (There are many ...
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Adjectival noun - singular or plural or both?

If I intend to use a noun as an adjective, can I use the noun both in plural and singular form? e.g. "noun modifier", "Bacon Batch", "A news reporter", "Sports center", "email address" My feeling is ...
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Origin of pluralisation of verbs and nouns in English

From this question, I was just wondering why plural nouns use the ending -s, while the exact same ending is used for the third person singular form of verbs. How did we get into this weird situation? ...
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“Singular” vs “Uncountable” nouns

Today, searching for the term "cloak", I came across these definitions From Longman DOCE 5th Ed. cloak noun [singular] an organization, activity, or way of behaving that deliberately protects ...
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“Room” versus “space” (in the sense of unoccupied volume)

Space: Place, having more or less extension; room. Room: Unobstructed space; space which may be occupied by or devoted to any object (…) (from Webster's) The general guiding his troops wants ...
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“Battery” and “Battery”, why are they called the same?

This post made an interesting point about what would be understood when the word battery is used. In the U.S. at least, the word battery is so rarely used outside the legal phrase assault and ...
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Why do we call snail mail “snail mail”?

Why do we call snail mail "snail mail"? So by default mail will refer to email?
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a word or hyphenated term for a resource harvester?

I need a generic term for mines, farms, collectors, and anything that harvests a resource (iron, food, water, etc). The closest thing I've thought of so far is "resource harvester", which is a little ...
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Are there any words in English that have a plural with a separate derivation?

There are some irregular plurals in English (child/children, goose/geese), but all of the ones I know of share the same root word. In some languages, there are some irregular pairs where the singular ...
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How to determine if a noun is a place or a thing

I'm having difficulty determining if certain nouns are considered places or things. For example, I'm unsure if 'a park' is a place or a thing. More generally, with the standard definition of a noun as ...
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How do I choose between a noun and a participle when picking one to use as an adjective?

I know that I can use both a noun and a particle as an adjective but what do I have to ask myself when choosing between them? For instance: Talking points, talk points Information ...
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“th” in mother, father, brother— but not sister

I was wondering why there is a "th" in mother, father, and brother, but not in sister? Is the etymology of the word different?
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Are there nouns that are always plural — have no plural counterpart?

Are there words that have no plural counterpart, because they are, in fact plural? Words like rice or scissors come to mind.
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Can the addition of an article change a noun from a thing to a place? [duplicate]

I'm an amateur trying to brush up on my grammar, and I've come across a confusing question. Can the addition of an article change the type of a noun? For example, if I used the term 'park', would this ...
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Can [adjective] [noun] ever describe a broader set than [noun]?

In phrases of the form [adjective] [noun], the adjective is often being used to narrow the set described by the noun alone. For example, "red cars" narrows the set of cars to only include ones that ...
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How is the distinction made between adverbs and nouns in adverbs which are representative of the thing of whose adverbial quality they also represent?

Adverbs of place, among other adverbs of the nature mentioned in the question, confuse me. Saying that "wherever" is an adverb when "wherever" functions both as the representation of the place and ...
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What are the treads on the side of the highway called?

On the sides of most highways (in the U.S. at least), there are rough treads just outside the travel lanes to snap a driver to attention if the vehicle is drifting off the road. Is there a name for ...
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Noun for person who tells how not to do something, and then does it

Okay so I'm sure many people have seen this happen before and it tends to happen apparently intentionally, in more of a way to seem comical, but here is the example for what I am talking about: ...
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How to choose an abbreviation for a given word?

I was trying to find a proper abbreviation for the word dictionary. Dict. or Dic. or something else? Obviousely there won't be a short form for each English word. But if there does exist one, how ...
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“Referee” vs. “umpire” vs. “judge”

What is the difference between referee, umpire and judge? How about the use of other similar words? In sports like tennis, basketball, football and soccer, when do we use which?
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What do you call it when it's not raining, but the atmosphere causes everything to be wet?

I'm currently having a discussion with colleagues about what this is. Basically it's kind of a cloud has rolled into to ground level. It's not raining in the sense that there are no drops of water ...
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What do you call a murderer who burns their victims alive?

I promise this isn't as weird as it sounds. I've tried a bit of Googling but I can't find anything that works well. I'm looking for a single word for a pyromaniac that burns people alive. The ...
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“On the one/other hand” vs. “on the one/other side”

There are two slightly different expressions which do mean the exact same thing, these are: On the one hand [...]. on the other hand [...] On the one side [...]. on the other side [...] ...
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Can I use a comparative adjective as a noun?

Can I use a comparative adjective as a noun, as in the following sentence: "The older told him to stop." Or do I have to use "one", as in: "The older one told him to stop." Thanks in advance!
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Can an adjective be converted into a noun by '-s'?

I saw a passage "this doesn't mean to get riches and honors." 'rich' is an adjective but 'riches' is a plural noun according to the dictionary. Are there any other examples where an adjective becomes ...
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344 views

Changing a person's name into an adjective

What do you call it when a person's name or group's name is changed into a adjective? Is it "conversion" or "functional shift"? For instance, saying a band's music is "Beatlesque" or that someone's ...
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What are other words for a collection of beautiful things?

I am looking for a word or term for a collection of beautiful things. Of either intrinsic value or even along the lines of 'a whole that is made of a sum of valuable parts'. Not necessarily in any ...
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What is an unmown lawn called?

To me "a lawn" conjures up an image of something well-kept, mowed green grass and flowers. So I've been thinking if a person doesn't care for the space in front of his house and lets it run wild, with ...
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Advice vs. Suggestion Why is the latter countable?

From an outsider, I think advice and suggestion have similar meanings. But I don't understand why the noun suggestion is countable whereas advice isn't. We can ask: Can you give me two or ...
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What does the word “cinemaddict” mean?

Please explain to me (non-native speaker) what the word "cinemaddict" means. What synonyms does it have?
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One word synonymous to display of power

I need one single word that is synonymous to "bold display of power/might/hold/domination in some place" .It would be much appreciated if someone can provide me a noun otherwise a verb will also do ...
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To have behavior?

Is the following use of have and behavior correct? All programs have the expected behavior.
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is this a regular noun?

In the following sentence do we presume that the word doctor ought to be treated as a regular noun, or should it begin with a capital letter? The doctor will see you now.
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Why do we say “plant a kiss”?

The term plant means a living organism; a thing with roots, shoots and leaves that needs water and sun in order to grow. So why do we say "to plant a kiss"? She planted a kiss...
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A word for “able to cause empathy or sympathy”? Sympathizable?

I feel like there's a word that's buried in my head that's refusing to answer my calls, that means to "elicit empathy". Any help would be appreciated. It might be a word that doesn't have the word ...
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What do you call someone who ‘makes a dictation’ or ‘dictates’?

I only found 'dictator', but even as a non-native-speaker I guess that is overly associated with 'tyrant' or 'despot'. In my case I need someone who speaks into a microphone for text recognition.
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“Steamroller” to describe a person as very determined

Can "steamroller" be used to describe a person like in the following sentence? He is like a steamroller; nothing will stop him from getting work done. Or are there any other meanings to the word ...
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Is there a synonym for “schadenfreude” that sounds more colloquial?

Is there a more colloquial synonym for "schadenfreude"? I'm specifically looking for a noun that denotes a pleasure derived from other people's misfortunes or sufferings. Sadly, I couldn't find any ...
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Using “the” before name equations/theory like “The Maxwell's Equation”, “The Archimedes Principle” etc

Is it correct to use "the" before name equations like "The Maxwell's Equation", "The Archimedes Principle", "The Kolmogorov Equation" etc. Even though "the" refers to the equation/principle, it ...
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Is there a word that describes a person who dies on his/her birthdate?

I have found references to birthdays and "deathdays," many words that reference either death or birth (natalis, obitus, quietus) but not both sharing the same day and month (even sharing the same year ...
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Words to describe the person who made the complaint and the one who is being complained

I am looking for nouns for A person who made a complaint; The person who is being complained about. I would have used "complainer" but that sounds wrong as it is closer to saying that person likes ...
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What do you call the Pringles container that looks like a ‘bottle’?

I don't need to eat that Pringles. I need the name of the bottle that contains them, i.e. which is long, doesn't need to be round, empty inside and light-weight. What do you call such a thing in ...
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Single word for people who are like “a frog in the well”

Is there a single word describing someone who is like a frog in a well? The frog believes the well is the entire world. How can I describe people who think that their own small environment is the ...
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Single word to define a person who thinks that there is always a scope for improvement

I am looking for a word that defines a person who thinks that there is always a scope for improvement. Just like the term "perfectionist" that defines a person who always looks for perfection. Is ...
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what do you call a person who speaks in opposites; not just being contrary or being a contrarian

I am reading G.K. Chesterton's Heretics. It appears to me that he presents his ideas in opposing view points in the same sentence. It is almost like he is of the opinion that his opinions are the only ...
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Hypernym for something like a blanket/sheet to cover oneself for keeping warm

Blanket seems too specific, one can cover oneself with a thin sheet instead. Bedsheet somehow seems like what you'd sleep on, not what you'd sleep under. Sheet is too general. One has sheets of ...
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English word for so consumed in thought you fail to hear [closed]

For example, someone is going to the mall, and he's so set on getting to the mall that when you call him he does not hear you.