Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept.

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Noun for an individual that formulates a question and also for an individual that addresses an answer

Given a person who formulates a question, may he or she be called the questioner or enquirer? Likewise, may a person that addresses or responds an answer be called answerer or responder? Which are ...
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Word that means “Something only a philosopher would argue with”

I remember reading (apparently not on the internet) a lighthearted definition of the word I want to use. This noun means a kind of quibble that is so trivial that only a metaphysician or similar ...
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What are some less ambiguous words for “choice,” “decision,” “option,” etc.?

1) You come to a fork in the road. You need to make a choice between going left or right. You face a decision between the left path and the right path. You have the option to advance in either ...
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39 views

Can “diligence” be used as a verb?

I've been coming across the verb "diligence" more and more in internal documents (either as "to diligence" or "diligencing"). I was under the impression that this word could only be used as a noun. I ...
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50 views

What do you call a person who is a mentor to someone but he is not aware of it

Say I have a person called 'X' and he has been following every move, every mistake of 'Y' and has secretly considered him a mentor in his own mind. But 'Y' does not know about it. One day 'X' decides ...
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7answers
428 views

Word for “things which exist”

Is there a noun that denotes "things which exist"? The only noun form of existence that I can find/think of is "existence" which is the condition of existing, not the things which do. It's to ...
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4answers
4k views

Is there a synonym for “schadenfreude” that sounds more colloquial?

Is there a more colloquial synonym for "schadenfreude"? I'm specifically looking for a noun that denotes a pleasure derived from other people's misfortunes or sufferings. Sadly, I couldn't find any ...
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2answers
37 views

Quadrangle vs. Quadrilateral

Which of two words standing for geometric figure with four edges and angles is more common for english-speaking people? P.S. I will use short word "quad" until I get answer for the question :)
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Nouns as adjectives

Nouns can be used as adjectives modifying other nouns, like: The subject was about supplier local content development. Can we rephrase the above to: The subject was about local content ...
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193 views

Gesture is to physical motion as [blank] is to speech

I am looking for an equivalent word for gesture in reference to speech. 'Overture' came up in offline discussion but it isn't quite right.
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7answers
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What do you call a person who's not yet a customer?

I'm currently doing an Applied Business assignment based on Business Planning - we had to generate our own business idea, including creating aims and objectives for the business. I've decided for one ...
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19answers
10k views

Single word for a very small amount of time [closed]

In French, if I want to quantify a very small amount of time (but not fixed: it can be 5 ms or 0.1 ms) I can use a pouième. Is there an equivalent in English? I'm not looking for an expression but ...
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40 views

Category of “In cahoots.”

If I say "They were in cahoots", 'cahoots' makes most sense as a noun. There are different kinds of nouns. I'm sure different linguistic systems divide them up differently. For instance, there are ...
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2answers
39 views

Is this pathetic fallacy or a different type of literary technique?

In the novel I am currently reading, it is said that someone hits the iron: "...raining blows down on the victim" I originally thought that this was pathetic fallacy, as the author is using the ...
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2answers
56 views

Is “home patch” completely equivalent to “hometown”?

I heard this expression "home patch" referring to "hometown" from a recent BBC Documentary. Since I am not a native English speaker, I am wondering about whether it is completely equivalent to "...
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27 views

Which word order is preferred: noun followed by gerund [duplicate]

I focus on this topic but I can't still understand. I don't know how to decide which one I should use. Please explain differences between "collecting coins" and "Coin-collecting." I know the first one ...
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1answer
22 views

Pre-booking vs booking?

I came across this work in my work, I am not sure which one to use for a screen menu in our application, "pre-booking" or "booking". This menu will allow users to book their work schedule in advance. ...
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2answers
844 views

What would you call someone who has an issue with nouns?

My wife: Can you get me some more coffee? Me: Sure, where is your cup? Wife: It's on the thing. Me: Where? Wife: the thing...err...end table. Or: Wife: Can you pick up the pictures on ...
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A noun for the act of brushing one's teeth?

I can't think of a proper word to use here... for example, in a hypothetical schedule there might be this: Shower - 9:30 Teeth brushing - 9:40 But Teeth brushing seems very strange/unnatural. Is ...
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31 views

Noun for someone who puts others down to strive

These are people you may even be friends with who make you feel like doo doo because they always have to one-up you. I know so many of them but I don't have a word to describe it. It's like they're ...
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1answer
42 views

Word for someone who is extremely good at one thing vs someone who is modestly skilled at many different things

Is there a word for someone who is a master of one particular weapon or martial art vs. someone who is skilled with many different weapons or martial art styles? (Maybe this can apply to skillsets in ...
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4answers
2k views

Noun for someone fun and caring and compassionate

What is a noun for a person who is nice and caring and fun to be around (a noun to refer to the person, as in "Bob is a _____".
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what do you call the person who passes the trophies to the prize giver/presenter?

The person who gives out the trophies to the winners are called award presenters. So what do u call the person who passes the trophies to the presenter? Thanks!
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5answers
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Synonyms to “teach a course”

I'm a non-native English speaker who sometimes teaches topics like programming and development practices but I haven't found a good way to express that in English. "Teaching" and "educating" sound ...
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Why is “blood” pronounced the way it is?

I mean, why isn't it pronounced "blue-d" rather than "blud". And this applies to "flood" too, but not "glood" or "clood" I imagine.
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What type of noun or word is used used for a juvenile animal?

For example 'collective noun'. 'Flock' of geese. Is there a term for words like kitten, cub, spiderling or lamb. Something like ' juvenile noun'.
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What is the purpose of grammatical gender in languages? [closed]

As an English speaker who has tried to learn German, I was introduced to the idea that nouns can have an implicit gender associated with them. However, I never understood why a language would have ...
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What is the difference between “scream” and “shriek”?

I’m now curious because while I was updating the Wikipedia page for Onomatopoeias, I saw two different sets of sounds for scream and shriek. The sounds listed under these two sections seem to overlap. ...
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Why isn't “citizen” spelled as “citisen” in British English?

In British English vocabulary, most words with "z" are spelled with "s". For example, "capitalization" is "capitalisation", "industrialization" is "industrialisation". But for some words, like "...
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2answers
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The judge decided to allow broadcast of the trial

The title is a usage example from Merriam-Webster Learners Dictionary... broadcast [noun, noncount] the act of sending out radio or television signals : the act of broadcasting something My ...
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article usage with singular nouns [migrated]

Do I have to use a/an articles before singular nouns, always or can I eliminate them? Is this true? I saw dog yesterday.
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9answers
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Afraid/shy/uncomfortable when going to meet someone so instead you create an excuse to avoid meeting/seeing them

This word was on my mind earlier, been trying to remember it but can't. It is used when someone is uncomfortable of meeting someone else; they fear something and overthink. So they try to avoid ...
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Does “we” count as a subject in the subject and verb agreement? [migrated]

As in this sentence - We share in the anger and frustration of our supporters and would like to assure them that we are working to conclude the matter in the best interests of Sunderland AFC. ...
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Do we ever pronounce “sale” as “sell”?

I'm not a native speaker and I have always heard that "sale" is pronounced "sail/say+l", and "sell" is pronounced "cell". But my teacher who is a lawyer always pronounces "sale" as "sell". He is not a ...
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a sentence in the Guardian.

I find this guy in the Guardian: Mourinho’s charm offensive started at his unveiling when he talked up aggressive football and dismissed the negative tactics that so bedevilled his predecessor’s ...
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Why are nouns corresponding to verbs ending with “oke” written with “c”?

I was wondering about this for a while now. Could anyone explain this phenomenon or is it just "English quirks"? Examples: invoke/invocation provoke/provocation revoke/revocation
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Correct title “Discovery, Localization, and Recovery from Faults”

I have a title for my Article. It is "Discovery, Localization, and Recovery from faults" I would like to know whether it is grammatically correct or not. The article discusses about some faults or ...
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Adjectival Usage of Racist

I have noticed a trend going back at least a decade of using the word racist (and for that matter sexist) as an adjective. This doesn't appear to fit the pattern of -ism words, which become -ist when ...
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59 views

What is the general name for these articles which feature lists?

Well, recently the internet has been taken by storm by articles such as: "20 Ways To Subtly...", "5 Things to Watch...", "15 things only a Pakistani..." etc,. So, what do you call such features?
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An employee called me “boss”, but I don't like it. How can I colloquially say that? [closed]

I'm a Coordinator at an English course in a small city in Brazil, and one of the teachers called me "boss" today. However, I don't appreciate being called that, therefore I'd like to tell him not to ...
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1answer
43 views

Korea Government vs Korean Government? [closed]

Simply Question, As a foreigner, I am really confused when to use Adjective or Noun before Noun. Which one is correct? I have seen the both of them many times. Korea Government vs Korean ...
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Can I use “sleep-in” as a noun like “lie-in”?

I have some questions about "sleep in". Do you use the expression "to have a lie-in" in the US, Canada and other English-speaking countries? Can I use "sleep-in" as a noun like "lie-in"? "Have a ...
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5answers
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913 views

What is a noun for “one who is responsible”?

The word "responsible" works as an adjective only. What is a noun for a person who bears some responsibility (i.e. is accountable for something)? Note: Originally my question was longer, but the ...
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1answer
64 views

Different strengths of words that have the same meaning?

I'm not sure how to ask what I want to ask, but I'll try. Is there a thing like the following and how is it called, maybe some kind of a rule or an explanation ? Let's say I have two nouns : idiot ...
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1answer
35 views

Can the word “publications” represent books, papers, journals, magazines, etc.?

The top-voted answer to Is there a noun representing books, papers, magazines, and all the other things one might read? is "documents" and "literature". I want to know how the word "publications" ...
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What do you call the various forms of a verb?

Could you help me fill in the question marks below? They represent the names that the various forms of the verb "replace" are called. Are there any variations that I am missing? Thanks! Replace --> ...
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what do you call a civilized person? [closed]

what do you call a civilized person? Civilian doesn't count, since a soldier can be civilized as well. I need one word to describe a person that is civilized, but not necessarily a civilian. It ...
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3answers
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What is the difference between “safe” and “vault”?

What is the difference between safe and vault, where both the words refer to a place where to put things you want to keep safe? As additional question, why does vault seem more frequently used in ...