Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept.

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What is the difference between “venom” and “poison”?

What is the difference between “venom” and “poison”? Both in usage and in meaning.
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Is this a noun clause or an adverbial?

I'm interested in the following question: I want to visit where my grandmother was born. To me it seems like a noun clause because I could replace the clause with a noun. For example: I want to ...
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Binding of adjectives to two consequtive nouns

Lets say I have a phrase a valid geometry pointer (which might be a little technical but the focus is on adjectives and nouns). How does the word valid bind to geometry pointer? Does it mean a (valid ...
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12answers
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Common term or single word for someone who is embarrassingly over-complimentary

Does English have a word for someone who compliments another person in a way which is awkward or even embarrassing? Someone who uses compliments which are overly-familiar and all but inappropriate, ...
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5answers
507 views

Should the common usage “Webmasters” be gender neutered into a separate webmistresses to describe female web site admin professionals?

Should the common usage "Webmasters" be gender neutered into a separate webmistresses to describe female web site admin professionals? Specifically why do we really need a term like web mistresses? ...
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1answer
52 views

Is it common to refer to the person steering a ship as 'pilot'?

According to its M-W entry (supported by some other dictionaries), a pilot (used of a person) can mean, among other things: a : one employed to steer a ship : helmsman b : a person who is ...
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0answers
35 views

A synonym for the prefix intro~

Good afternoon, While working on a philosophical paper I came across a slight problem and while I searched for an answer on my own, I seem predisposed to not find any, at least not in the sense of an ...
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3answers
143 views

How can you tell which noun a clause modifies?

I'm a ESOL teacher, and I'm having trouble answering a question that a student asked me recently. We were going over long sentences, and found this one from the New York Times: Saudi Arabia said ...
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2answers
189 views

Why is the plural of “aircraft” not “aircrafts”?

I came along this sentence: Today, we have used a large number of assets, comprising of 34 aircraft, 40 ships, hundreds of men, thousands of man-hours has been deployed I consulted dictionaries ...
3
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6answers
115 views

Verb or noun for - when I am not short of words but unable to speak lucidly

A situation when I am not short of words but confused by the setting. the situation does not let me speak properly/lucidly. I kind of trip over my words. I don't know what to do. The silence was ...
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2answers
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“adjective noun noun”: which noun does the adjective refer to (“electrical system operators”) [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How does the hyphen change the meaning in expressions like “high performance” and “high-performance”? Is there a grammar rule behind the hyphen in the phrase 'one-act play'? ...
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7answers
246 views

What do you call the period between having sex?

If a couple are having a romantic or sexy get away where they're staying in bed and having sex and otherwise hanging out - is there a term use for the periods where they're not actually in the act of ...
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1answer
120 views

Changing a person's name into an adjective

What do you call it when a person's name or group's name is changed into a adjective? Is it "conversion" or "functional shift"? For instance, saying a band's music is "Beatlesque" or that someone's ...
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4answers
28k views

What's the difference between “egotism” and “egoism”?

I am interested in the difference between these two seemingly synonymous terms.
2
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3answers
31 views

Is “reservee” an acceptable word like employee?

I see one reference from an old version of Webster but not much else. Word says it is misspelled. Which is it? Our list of reservees include Beyonce, Cher, Bono...
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1answer
103 views

What types of words/phrases are “this” “here” & “they”?

I'm currently doing an analytic essay on my drama coursework (fun.). I'd like to explain how the playwright never reveals the exact setting of the act, by using only phrases such as "this","here", and ...
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5answers
140 views

Single word to define a person who thinks that there is always a scope for improvement

I am looking for a word that defines a person who thinks that there is always a scope for improvement. Just like the term "perfectionist" that defines a person who always looks for perfection. Is ...
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2answers
37 views

Can the word “imperative” be a noun? [closed]

Here's an example: It is our imperative to bomb the volcano early, thus preventing a much larger eruption later. Is "imperative" correct there? It seems to be synonymous with "duty", or maybe ...
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12answers
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What do you call it when it's not raining, but the atmosphere causes everything to be wet?

I'm currently having a discussion with colleagues about what this is. Basically it's kind of a cloud has rolled into to ground level. It's not raining in the sense that there are no drops of water ...
2
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4answers
66 views

What do you call someone who has a disease or mental condition?

I'm looking for a noun to suffix to a condition to refer to the person who has that condition. Existing words are like: Cancer patients are subject to chemotherapy which causes them to lose ...
3
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5answers
182 views

What can we call “ an employee who is under-productive but the quality of his work is enviable”

A pleasant expression for an employee who has remained under-productive despite several feedback. (QUANTITATIVELY WORST) There are workers who are unable to churn up BIG numbers but the ...
0
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0answers
32 views

When did 'street', 'road', etc. start being capitalised?

Old newspapers and books seem to very rarely capitalise (and often hyphenate) phrases like "High street", "Herbert-road", and "Trusting lane". These days, we capitalise "Street", "Road", and "Lane". ...
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2answers
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Humans or people?

This is the sentence I've read: Freedom is something humans in all times have fought for. I am under the impression that the use of humans is not adequate here. Thus, my question is: when to ...
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1answer
34 views

Are these the correct nouns? “… responsibilities consisted of ensuring continuity of reception and in-house mail services.”

"... responsibilities consisted of ensuring continuity of reception and in-house mail services." Is it "continuity" or "continuation"? Is it "reception service" or "receptionist service"?
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which is wrong? 1. “What is your suggest?” 2. “What is your suggestion?” [closed]

which is wrong? 1. "What is your suggest?" 2. "What is your suggestion?"
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3answers
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Words to describe the person who made the complaint and the one who is being complained

I am looking for nouns for A person who made a complaint; The person who is being complained about. I would have used "complainer" but that sounds wrong as it is closer to saying that person likes ...
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1answer
344 views

What are the differences between, and the connotations of, “flag”, “banner”, and “standard”?

See also: Difference between "banner" and "flag". I would like to know about standard, too. What would you say are the differences between the three words?
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7answers
495 views

What is the word for stories/movies/poems that have a moral lesson [closed]

I am reading this book - and I have been trying to remember the word but it's eluding me. What is the word for stories/movies/poems that provide a moral lesson.
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1answer
42 views

Is the phrase “horizon road” grammatically correct? [closed]

Is the phrase "horizon road" grammatically correct, and if so, is it equal to "road to horizon"?
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15answers
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One word for someone who doesn't care about anything

A pessimist is someone who always considers negative outcomes of a situation, whereas an optimist always considers the positive outcomes. Is there a word for someone who, in any given situation, ...
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5answers
138 views

What is the difference between “poverty” and “poorness”?

What's the subtle difference? I'm not very good with grammar...
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2answers
91 views

What do you call a person doing a task that a computer can do better?

Is there a term for a person performing a task that a computer could perform faster/better, but the reason the person is doing it is because of a failure in a company to improve processes/systems?
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0answers
34 views

What is special about Anglo-French legal usage of [the] infinitive as a noun?

I was reading the etymology of attainder (n.), when I saw its reference to: use of French infinitives as nouns, especially in legal language, see waiver. waiver (n.) [<--] [...] Other ...
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2answers
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Dedicated to producing vs dedicated to the production - use of gerund in place of noun

- A factory famous for the production of. . . - A factory famous for producing . . . - A farm dedicated to the cultivation of . . . - A farm dedicated to cultivating . . . - The firm focused on the ...
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1answer
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A question about the Ancient Greek word 'πῦρ' in Arher Machen's “The Shining Pyramid” [closed]

Has anyone read this novel? I am quite puzzled. πῦρ is the derivation of fire. Has fire anything to do with Pyramid?
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2answers
429 views

Line Art: A word like Scrimshaw or Filligree?

I'm looking for a word that refers to a fine, decorative line-work illustration that is used for accenting signage or letterhead. It's similar in usage to scrimshaw (except not a picture) or filigree ...
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2answers
144 views

When must a gerund be preceded by a possessive pronoun as opposed to an accusative one?

I was recently reading this very interesting post here: When is a gerund supposed to be preceded by a possessive pronoun? In this thread, it is argued persuasively that we could use either his or ...
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3answers
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Why is there no “autumntime” or “falltime”?

Why is "autumntime" (or "falltime") not a word? wintertime => sure springtime => fine summertime => lovely But apparently autumn/fall has no equivalent. Why?
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3answers
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Indefinite articles used with plural nouns: It was AN amazing TWO DAYS

The indefinite article a(n), derives from the old English word an meaning "one". Generally this word only occurs in determiner function before noun phrases which are singular. However, there seem to ...
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2answers
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What's the name of this boat?

Is there a more appropriate name for a boat like the one below? Other than fishing boat, wood boat, rowboat, canoe. Thank you
2
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2answers
52 views

Where a name related to a noun should be placed?

Say I have three kinds of items that I call A, B, and C. Now, I want to ask someone to create one. Which form is the correct one? Create an item A. or Create an A item. ?
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2answers
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A person who is trying to impress somebody

What do we call a person who is trying to impress somebody (not necessarily to gain any advantage). For e.g., he buys them expensive products, always talking in a sweet manner etc. To describe an act ...
1
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1answer
47 views

Should corporations be referred to in the singular or plural? [duplicate]

I keep coming across articles, especially technology related ones, where corporations are referred to in the plural. Example, "Oracle have decided to make G1 the standard ..." or "Google have become ...
0
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1answer
62 views

Non-use of Determiners

I have reviewed several related posts here but am still quite confused with the use of determiners. Say, in this sentence - "They reviewed the forms again to ensure completeness and accuracy." What ...
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1answer
76 views

Order of noun + modifying noun

Which one is correct or preferred? The command /reload is... < some description > The /reload command is... < some description >
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2answers
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what article should go before specific games?

I came across an article in the below link about general and specific nouns General and specific Nouns My question is which article (grammar article) should go before these general, more specific, ...
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3answers
58 views

Why do we have “anxiousness”, but not “frightenness”?

Why do we have the word "anxiousness", but not the word "frighteness"? Both would mean something similar: "Being anxious" respectively Being frightened" ps: To make it even more analogous, I could ...
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3answers
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Is there a word for a person who is not rich, but nevertheless acts as if he's wealthy in front of strangers?

My neighbor is just like that person, so, I think to write a poem on him and desire to break his self-forgetfulness by narrating his pride to him!
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8answers
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Origin of the name “paw-paw” [closed]

I've always known this fruit as papaya. It was only in recent times that I started hearing "paw-paw" used instead of "papaya". I also looked up the dictionary, but no relevant word came up. Where did ...
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Word for not knowing about something

I would like to know some word choices (can be a noun, adjective,...) for not knowing about something, with a positive connotation with a negative connotation in a neutral way For example, I ...