Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept.

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Word to describe the setting for a particular time?

I'm creating an ad of sorts for an upcoming event without a set date. What's a word to describe the setting including weather/time of year/occasion for a particular time? I'd use it in a sentence ...
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3answers
111 views

Polish (the substance, not the language)

I'm talking about the stuff you use when you're polishing. According to etymonline.com, this usage has been around for less than 200 years: polish (n.) 1590s, "absence of coarseness," from ...
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what to call “something that we desire”?

Everyone has desire for something. A politician has desire for a position. An unemployed has desire for a job. A baby has desire for candy. The things which they have desire for have different names, ...
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5answers
283 views

Word for someone who “really likes and pays close attention to symmetry”

I was thinking of meticulous, but is there any word that is specific to being meticulous with the symmetry of things? I am very ________ because I pay very close attention to symmetry. ...
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2answers
112 views

Is there a word that describes a person who dies on his/her birthdate?

I have found references to birthdays and "deathdays," many words that reference either death or birth (natalis, obitus, quietus) but not both sharing the same day and month (even sharing the same year ...
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40 views

A noun that refers to attendees of a cocktail party

I'm looking for a noun to refer to a group of people socializing, for instance a loosely knit group of work friends gossiping at a cocktail party.
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1answer
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I need the name of a thing

This tool is used to make spice. In the Hindi language this is called लोढ़ा-lodha but I don't know the English word for it.
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204 views

“look forward to” vs. “do not look forward to”

Why the sentences "We look forward to < noun> ..." and "We do not look forward to < verb>..." are both correct ? A < noun> has to be used in the first and a < verb> has to be used in the ...
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32 views

“the rustle of tires” vs “the rustling of tires”: pompous or not, is there a rule, or is it random?

Scene: high school. Time: the present. A teacher went through a student's essay in which an out-of-the-way house in the sticks was described. It (the house) sat in the middle of a picturesque grove, ...
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3answers
94 views

I swear, it's not flotsam

I am trying to find an appropriate word to describe multiple items that wash up on shore. I would prefer a single-word answer, but don't know that one exists. I am trying to name a photo album that ...
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2answers
64 views

Singular vs plural noun following list

In the following sentence should cheese be singular or plural? Pizzeria-style crust topped with herbs, spices, Mozarella, Provolone and Parmesan cheese/cheeses & pepperoni. Pepperoni must ...
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2answers
80 views

Name for a reader who does not comprehend

Is there a word for a person who uses words that they don't understand. Or a name for the usage of words that one does not comprehend? For example, I'm trying to describe a woman leading a training ...
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6answers
503 views

What is a noun for “one who is responsible”?

The word "responsible" works as an adjective only. What is a noun for a person who bears some responsibility (i.e. is accountable for something)? Note: Originally my question was longer, but the ...
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1answer
433 views

A word that describes someone who 'sees/brings out the good in others'?

The person doesn't have to be good themselves, but they can bring the good out of others. The word doesn't have to be an english word, I just want to know if such a word exists. Ex. Beauty with the ...
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1answer
48 views

Do I need to add “the” to a plural noun? [duplicate]

I am confused by whether or not to add "the" before a plural noun. For example, do the following two sentences mean something slightly different from each other? (1) We analyzed the potential ...
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3answers
79 views

Question about Generic Statements for Plural Nouns

Sentences are: "The rainforests are in danger." "Rainforests are in danger." So in this case, I think that they are both correct sentences...but: "Guitars are musical instruments." "The guitars ...
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2answers
585 views

Noun form of realistic? [closed]

I am looking for the noun form of the word realistic, or a word that would be equivalent. Something like "realisticity"? Here is the context: The (realisticity?) of the characters in a novel.
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1answer
61 views

Can I use the word “Applicator” to describe a person in the following context?

Here's the context in question, please read on: "The final proof is in the listening and John knows this. This knowledge makes him a designer in constant dynamic relationship with what he makes, ...
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32 views

which word gives emphasis to other word

If A-cum-B denotes that, A and B are similar standing Which word describes B has having greater significance than A? For example : Accounts cum Finance means - both accounts and finance are of ...
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133 views

Word for a short exhalation, antonym of “gasp”?

When you're disappointed or upset and rather than say anything you make a short exhalation, how's that called? It's sort of as if you said 'huh' while looking at the floor standing next to the person ...
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27 views

England is/are playing? [duplicate]

I have this doubt when it comes to sports and teams. Is it England is playing or England are playing? Similarly, is it "Arsenal is playing..." or "Arsenal are playing..."?
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0answers
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'In the Fox Theater' or 'In the Fox theater' or 'In The Fox Theater' [duplicate]

I am confused over the use of 'the' and capitalization.
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66 views

Should I use singlar noun or plural noun (Phone or phones)

I have some difficulties when I want to talk with a group of people in using nouns. Should I use all nouns in plural form? For example, when I am talking to a group of students and want to teach them ...
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What is the plural of “Mars”?

What is the plural of Mars? Is it Marses or Mars' (note the apostrophe)? Or something else? EDIT: I'm not sure where I got the idea of Mars' from. I suppose I was thinking it might be a zero plural ...
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1answer
77 views

Noun + Gerund vs Gerund + Noun

I try to shorten the expression: "period [of smth] when [the device] moves / stands" to use it as a parameter name, and have come up with these two options: 'Period moving' / 'Period standing' ...
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What do you call a person who uses the required amount of resources? [duplicate]

A person who does work with the maximum care in order to avoid waste. Example: A wife who cooks only for the number of guests invited at that moment.
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Person who consumes in a restaurant or bar [closed]

What's the word that refers to the person that consumes dishes and/or cocktails in a bar or restaurant? In Spanish, it would be "Comensal". Google translate suggests me "diner", which might cause ...
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94 views

“The exam date” vs. “the exam day”

I will send you my proposal two months before the exam date. I will send you my proposal two months before the exam day. Which one is more correct?
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What do you call the second word in the naming of sporting events, e.g. “basketball GAME,” “wrestling MATCH,” “track MEET”?

I'm creating a database of sports. There's a column in this database where we store this second word. We're trying to think of a sensible name for this column. Ideas we've tossed around: competition ...
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2answers
68 views

Atheist Inspired by Religion [closed]

What do you call an atheist who is inspired by mythology and religion ? Inspired -- by the "good morals" religions preach like forgiveness ..blah blah
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69 views

Difference between 'gain optimization' and 'gains optimization'

What is the difference between gain optimization and gains optimization in a financial context? I want to know in particular if one of those terms is better English, or if they have different ...
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319 views

“Fodder” meaning “useless chatter”?

Is there a usage of the word fodder that means "useless chatter"? I have used it this way in the past but can't find it referenced that way currently.
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522 views

Mango: is it a common noun or a proper noun? How can you tell? [closed]

I am confused about the word mango. Is it a Proper Noun or a Common noun?
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Can you maintain a consideration?

More than 1 person has stumbled on this line in a draft report here: "...such that the considerations outlined in Section 1.2 are maintained" Can you maintain a consideration? Yes, the ...
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Serious word for 'a bad guy'

I was trying to raise awareness of XSS attacks on a website, by launching a harmless XSS attack and showing the follow message if users fell for it: IT WAS AN XSS ATTACK! HAD IT BEEN MADE BY ...
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1answer
77 views

What's the noun based on the adverb 'deliberately'?

If I do something with a great sense of purpose, if I do it extremely... intentionally and deliberately. I do it with... deliberalcy? Deliberacy? My searches have returned nothing.
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1answer
332 views

Capitalisation of pathos, logos, and ethos

Are the words "pathos," "logos," and "ethos," capitalised? I'm not sure if they are proper nouns.
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3answers
279 views

Verb form for Didactic

What are possible verb forms or more proper forms for the word didactic? I know that didact is only a noun, although audiologically it sounds as though it could be a verb. The sentence I am trying to ...
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In search of a noun

I have learnt that a person who lodges a complaint is referred to as the complainant. How do I then refer to a person who sends a compliment?
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276 views

Which one is correct “ students' birthday or students' birthdays ”?

I know that children is a plural noun and birthday is a countable noun but I see a sentence in a book " children have a birthday cake at their birthday ". Why is children which is a plural noun ...
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1answer
97 views

Noun as modifier—singular or plural? [duplicate]

Which one is correct? statistical models for process monitoring Statistical models for processes monitoring.
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40 views

When is it okay to begin an substantive appositive with a noun?

This sentence sounds quite incorrect: The Bahamas, series of islands surrounding the USA, are beneficial to China's economy. It seems that we need an article after the first comma; a quantifier ...
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Difference between lead and leash?

He held his dog on a lead or He held his dog on a leash Both of these are acceptable English sentences. The words 'lead' and 'leash' in this context are synonymous. But what's the ...
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1answer
183 views

Is fever a countable or uncountable noun?

I have some difficulties in using the noun 'fever'. Is it countable or uncountable? Is it correct to say "They have fevers."?
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132 views

Common Noun vs Proper Noun

I'm proofing language for a proposed statute change and am confused about whether or not the word Program needs to be capitalized throughout the document. Lots of questions... A Health Professionals ...
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230 views

English, I'm asking if trash can be an adjective in this sentence formation:

"This has been thrown in the trash can." In this instance, wouldn't trash be an adjective describing what type of can it is? I'm being told by a German English teacher that 'trash can' is a noun in ...
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Can “yesterdays” (plural) be used to denote a range of past days?

So I just learned that "yesterdays" is a word (without the apostrophe). It is the plural of "yesterday". The trouble is, what does plural of "yesterday" really mean? I could not find any example ...
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3answers
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I'm looking for a word similar to an abstract concept

I'm looking for a word to describe when you are aware that something is real, however because you've never experienced said-thing firsthand, the thought of the thing seems like an abstract concept ...
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4answers
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Is there a term for the character trait of assuming things about people?

I'm sure you've had a conversation with someone like this. The person constantly reads something into everything that you say or makes quick judgements about you based on very little information. I ...
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Word for an elderly person with diminishing mental faculties

What do you call an old person suffering from the loss of mental faculties? According to the Oxford dictionary, dotard is an old person, especially one who has become weak or senile. But a weak or ...