Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept.

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2answers
718 views

Difference between the use of “supplier”, “vendor”, “provider”

Which is the difference between the use of supplier, vendor, provider? The way I see it, they are complete synonyms. Am I right?
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1answer
78 views

“Gained the academic title of professor”

I have a bit of a problem finding the right way to say/write the following: Gained the academic title of professor of xxx. Is the choice of gained fine, or should I use some other verb that is ...
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2answers
102 views

What's the noun for “synchronous”?

If the noun for "synchronized" is "synchronicity", what's the noun for "synchronous"? Is there even such a noun?
4
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9answers
608 views

Word for “someone who injects themselves into conversations”

I'm trying to think of a word for someone who injects themselves into conversations. Typically in an uninvited manner. You know the guy that comes over when you're talking to someone else and stands ...
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3answers
406 views

What's the difference between “lad” and “mate” in British English? [closed]

Can "lad" only be used to address a male, while "mate" both male and female?
2
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1answer
56 views

Australis, Austrinus, Australe - in constellations

I was having a look at the official constellations, and I noticed three with similar names: Corona Australis Piscis Austrinus Triangulum Australe Now the "Austral" definitely means "southern", as ...
3
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2answers
328 views

When has the phrase “dirty sex” started to be used?

We say 'dirty sex' nowadays,quite often. When we're referring to hardcore sex that includes role play, bondage, sex toys and whatever else goes beyond the simple act of copulation, we say 'Dirty sex'. ...
0
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3answers
186 views

Is there a word that means “the person who is to receive a report”?

Is there a word that means "the person who is to receive a report"? I'm looking for the equivalent of assignee with the difference that it would describe the person who is to be reported to. ...
16
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3answers
527 views

''Honey'' Usage Question

my friend (he's from Europe, white in his 20s) was in the U.S. a while ago and went to a diner a few times. A woman there (in her late 40s, most likely), kept calling him ''honey'' and ''sweetie'' ...
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1answer
181 views

How do you say 'cooked pig small intestine filled with pig blood' in English?

In our culture, we usually serve cooked pig small intestine filled with pig blood in times of feast. Is there a single English word for this? In our language, it's Sa-thithun.
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2answers
171 views

What does the word “s***storm” mean exactly?

The definition of shitstorm in New Oxford American Dictionary: a situation marked by violent controversy. The definition in Wikipedia: a vulgar dysphemism for a chaotic and unpleasant ...
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4answers
235 views

What do you call someone who is above average?

Is there any word (noun?) for a person who is not bad at doing something, yet not too good?
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2answers
110 views

Does the word “discussion” imply any length?

Does a discussion among two or more people have to have a certain amount of words or sentences or people involved? I'm interested in both the technically correct definition and the way people use the ...
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1answer
73 views

Is this “debate” a noun or a verb?

Monday's vote opens the floor to debate on the bill and the Senate is expected to schedule a full vote by week's end.
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2answers
104 views

Funds or Money?

I'm having an ongoing dispute in my organization over whether to use the word "funds" or "money" to describe, um, money that we award to grant applicants. My position is that a fund holds money. ...
4
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6answers
384 views

What to call a person with whom you spend time just because?

What to call a person with whom you spend time not because you like them but because you haven't found anyone better? EDIT: I am asking more about a romantic kind of relationship than mere ...
0
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2answers
150 views

What word would be a good replacement for the use of “licensee” [closed]

A lot of my clients do not natively speak English. Because of this, confusion has arisen over what is meant by the term licensee. Each product requires its own unique license key and the licensee's ...
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2answers
113 views

What's the word for a counterparty of a customer?

When I want to refer to the people (and organizations) who supply me with the goods and services I consume---that is, those of whom I am a customer---what word do I use? My candidates: Customee ...
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2answers
70 views

Can retransmit be used as a noun?

Example usage: There have been three retransmits. Is there a more appropriate word?
2
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3answers
163 views

One word that can be used to represent student and professional

I am having two options for users to select from, either they are a Student or they are a Professional. What one word can be used to represent both the names collectively? I tried a lot but couldn't ...
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0answers
198 views

Which cardinal came first: the priest, the bird, or the color? [closed]

I'm wondering about the etymology of the word cardinal. I know that cardinal can refer to any of the following: A top-level priest in the Catholic church that sometimes wears red and a crested hat ...
0
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1answer
134 views

Can “conversant” be a noun?

Googling amongst the world's online dictionaries produces conflicting results, but on the whole indicates that the answer is "no". However, it feels so natural to say: The conversants conversed. ...
3
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1answer
92 views

Why is the word “pepper” used for both capsicum (e.g. bell pepper) and piper (e.g. black pepper)?

They clearly look different and they don't have that much in common. Taxonomically, they also belong to different families
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5answers
3k views

Word for “when somebody does something without realizing it”

I can't think of this word. It's when somebody is doing something but they don't realize they are doing it. For example: Suppose you're a girl and you are falling in love with a guy. When he ...
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4answers
4k views

What word describes a policeman who is not wearing a uniform?

How do you describe a police officer on duty, who wears casual clothes because he/she doesn't want to disclose his/her identity?
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1answer
200 views

When to use singular or plural of nouns [closed]

I'm not sure which to use of these to use: The art of extracting onion from salad. The art of extracting onion from a salad. The art of extracting onions from salad. The art of extracting onions ...
2
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3answers
78 views

Jumps vs. Leaps

Does a curve in science or finance have sudden jumps or sudden leaps? We talk about a discontinuous curve. My position is that jumps is more appropriate but I might be wrong.
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2answers
776 views

What does 'provision' exactly mean in a legal document?

Now I'm asked to look at a legal document(here) and answer the question that which provisions apply to a certain case. However, I don't know what the word 'provision' means in a legal context. ...
18
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5answers
809 views

Tom, Jake and Jenny aren't looking forward to Thanksgiving. Why?

And "Hen" (their mother) isn't much looking forward to it either. Why? I can answer that question myself, it's because they're all turkeys. Tom is an adult male turkey (also often referred to as a ...
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3answers
180 views

To talk angrily and provoked in a low voice

I'm looking for a word that can describe a person continuously talking angrily as if fighting with someone, for example over a phone, but in a low and whispering manner.
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4answers
112 views

Growing abruptly and aggressively - words

How to describe a sudden increasing in size, volume. For example when fires grow suddenly and rapidly. What does that fire do?
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4answers
158 views

Word for “getting careless and slacking”

Can you suggest some words which can describe a person who is starting to get careless and who slacks, or the very action of becoming careless? A person who was efficiently and elaborately doing their ...
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4answers
1k views

Word for a person who lives in the past

Someone who is highly nostalgic and is stuck in the past, better days
2
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1answer
162 views

Etymology/word formation of “program” (as in computer program)

The word is obviously derived from the noun 'programme' however I can't work out which way it's most likely to have been created. I'm thinking its either descended from the British spelling of the ...
2
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2answers
120 views

Do robotic insects have “antennas” or “antennae”?

I know that insects have antennae and machines have antennas. Which plural form should I use for something that’s both insectoid and a machine? Does one officially take precedence?
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3answers
108 views

The state of not progressing [closed]

What is the state of not progressing called? Going in circles. When the person is not progressing despite the active trying.
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2answers
426 views

Words that describe the repetitive sound of machine [closed]

I'm looking for words that can describe the repetitive sounds that machine produces (For example an engine). Those droning, looped and long-lasting sounds. Patterned sounds of various parts of an ...
3
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2answers
163 views

Is there a word that describes a pre-wedding party?

So there are many words that describe the event that takes place before the wedding: stag do, hen do, bachelor party, bachelorette party. Is there a single word that encompasses all those things?
2
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2answers
106 views

Usage of the word “truancy” in a workplace context

I recently made this personal discovery of the word truancy. It means: the action of staying away from school without good reason I am wondering if there's a parallel to this word for workplace ...
4
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1answer
174 views

Origin of the word “Jellyfish”

Does anyone know the history of the word jellyfish and how it was defined and popularized? OED lists a usage in 1707, but that is referring to a gelatinous vertebrate fish. They start showing uses ...
2
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4answers
202 views

What does 'dispensation' mean in this particular context?

I was reading this article and stumbled upon this line First, presidential dispensation is useful, but it's not remotely permanent. White House occupants change. A more authoritarian chief ...
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1answer
108 views

Why do we pronounce “disease” like that?

What is the rule of pronunciation in this case? Why do we say like if there was an "e" in place of the "i"?
0
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1answer
52 views

Any (old?) print literature use of 'codecessor'?

Summary: Is there a (possibly old) print literature/use of the word codecessor? Background: I intuitively used the word assuming it exists in peer-reviewed publications first around 2008 only to be ...
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1answer
80 views

Hypernyms for restaurant dishes

Suppose I classify dishes in a restaurant menu. I would like to classify them by two categories: Category 1: entree main course dessert etc. Category 2: meat fish vegetables cheese etc. ...
3
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4answers
173 views

Acrylic vs methacrylate

A native Spaniard here, asking about what we call metacrilato — this manufactured product: What would you call it? I have seen use both acrylic and Methacrylate, maybe one of them is more ...
1
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2answers
356 views

Noun order: “He and we…” or “We and he…”? Similarly, “…him and us” or “…us and him”?

It's convention and polite to always list yourself last in a list. I say "John and I went to the store" and not "I and John went to the store." So does that mean that I should always list myself ...
2
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8answers
412 views

Need a word for the inability to feel anger

I need a term for the inability to feel anger. Features desired: Single word Prefer connotations of incapacity rather than benefit Prefer reasonably clear specificity to anger More clinical tone ...
3
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2answers
163 views

Can a self studying college drop-out call himself a student?

I have dropped the college this year but I am still studying/learning without college using books and internet resources. WordWeb defines student as "A learner who is enrolled in an educational ...
3
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3answers
4k views

Isle vs. Island

Some islands are called isle like "Isle of Man", "Isle of Tortuga" and the "British Isles". Other islands are called island, like "Island of Malta" or "Island of Cyprus". What is the difference ...
1
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5answers
1k views

Why is “shrimp” the plural of “shrimp”? [closed]

When you talk about "shrimp" in the plural, there's no "s." However, how can you explain it grammatically?