Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept.

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What do you call an online newspaper?

Is there a better word for a news website besides "aggregator" (which implies the source only curates information) or "blog" (which implies the source only does opinion/commentary/no real reporting ...
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What is the opposite of a retronym?

A retronym is the name given to an obsolete or older object to differentiate it from its newer replacement. Examples include "straight razor" (once just called "razor" until the modern razor), "analog ...
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What do you call the Pringles container that looks like a ‘bottle’?

I don't need to eat that Pringles. I need the name of the bottle that contains them, i.e. which is long, doesn't need to be round, empty inside and light-weight. What do you call such a thing in ...
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290 views

What is a word for making fun of someone that's learning or new at something?

With as many word suggestions as possible, what words can you use to describe a person who makes fun of someone for being new to something or learning? Like for example, being shamed for asking ...
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1answer
72 views

Connotations of the word “cohort”

Outside of the scientific sense (cohort study), does the word cohort have positive, negative or neutral connotations? The dictionary defines it as a group of people or single companion and it ...
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What's the name of these “banners” used in Japanese restaurants?

What's the name of these "banners" used in Japanese restaurants? I'm interested in both Japanese name and English name (closest approximation). Thank you.
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Is the pronunciation change from “woman” to “women” unique in English?

Is "woman/women" the only English word group that undergoes a change - via conjugation, pluralization... whatever may be the cause - wherein a syllable of the polysyllabic word has spelling changes ...
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1answer
55 views

Can the word “mither” be used as a noun?

Can the word mither - a regional word that I have come across more and more recently - be used as a noun? I understand that it isn't listed as a noun in dictionaries, but my husband uses it as a noun ...
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495 views

Is there a word like “conjugate” that means switching a noun between plural and singular forms?

Changing a verb to reflect the number of people and tense of the sentence is called conjugation. Is there a word that means toggling a noun between singular and plural? ie. "The computer program ...
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192 views

Race is to Racist as Religion is to what? [duplicate]

Please have a one word answer; and it is not zealot. Zealots are idealists. Being a racist has a very negative connotation. Also maintain the same part of speech. I would like a noun.
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One word for “temperature” and “humidity”

Is there a word (or a word combination) that would include both temperature and humidity, but not other parameters? Environmental conditions springs to mind, but I feel that it describes much more ...
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2answers
191 views

In which circumstances is the expression “I have an ask” more appropriate than “I have a request”?

I found the following definition for ask as a noun. a demand or situation that requires a specified degree of effort or commitment. Example: "it is a big ask for him to go and play 90 minutes" ...
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154 views

What do you call a type of person you don't want to become? [closed]

Say this person had every single personality trait that you despised. Somebody that you don't want to be like or be associated with. What would this type of person be called?
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Describing a person who prefers older (not new) or vintage things [duplicate]

Is there a word or phrase that refers to a person who prefers older (not new)or vintage things?
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0answers
68 views

In the sentence “We do have free will.”, what does “free” stands for?

In this sentence "We do have free will.", is "free-will" a compound noun? And if so, is "free" an adjective? Edit I'm talking about the theological concept of "free will". Which, in some cases, you ...
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1answer
40 views

How to enumerate adjectives without using the same noun? How to give preference to the noun?

I like orange, chocolate, strawberry & banana, kiwi, pineapple and vanilla milkshakes. Imagining there are many more adjectives, in case someone wants to emphasize and give preference to ...
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2answers
83 views

Is 'storage' countable or uncountable if it means warehouse or repository?

I need to write an article and I have to use this word in the context. I cannot replace the word with a different word (warehouse, repository, etc.). I checked this word via ...
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Word for the text ready to be copied?

If you click on the share button at the bottom left of this question, you will see the text already selected, ready to be copied. What do you call this text? My answer is copied-ready text, but I ...
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5answers
122 views

A word to describe a prolific scientist, inventor or explorer who was inspirational and innovative [closed]

What are some nouns with which we would refer to a scientist, inventor or explorer who was inspirational and innovative. To think of an analogy: biscuits are cheap,while cookies are expensive. ...
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Can an adjective be converted into a noun by '-s'?

I saw a passage "this doesn't mean to get riches and honors." 'rich' is an adjective but 'riches' is a plural noun according to the dictionary. Are there any other examples where an adjective becomes ...
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1answer
45 views

Should “repetition” be singular or plural?

We all know what repetition is. I'm trying to construct the following sentence: He called out her name in an earnest, helpless repetition. or should it be He called out her name in earnest, ...
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4answers
71 views

bigotry, with or without prejudice

Is prejudice required to be bigotry? big·ot·ry ˈbiɡətrē/ noun intolerance toward those who hold different opinions from oneself So, if you like having sex with little kids and in your ...
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Why the adjective “vague” comes after the noun “change”?

In Longman dictionary there is an example for disingenuous which says "Keeping the details of the tax changes vague is disingenuous." the adjective vague precedes the verb is and follows the noun ...
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94 views

Word describing a word ending with “-tion”

If it exists, what is a/the word describing a word ending with "-tion" (e.g. execution, exemption, perdition, definition, proposition, etc.)? "A word ending with '-tion' is called a(n) __."
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4answers
152 views

One word that means “something that is standard/uniform and meant to be copied and modified as needed”

What is one word that means "something that is standard/uniform and meant to be copied and modified as needed" Like a spreadsheet that has all the basic info and only requires unique data.
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1answer
48 views

Noun Form of Faithful [closed]

I am working on a quarter paper in which I compare two adaptations (adaptions?) of Romeo and Juliet. However, I am not entirely sure what word I can use as the noun form of faithful. My teacher said ...
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How is “Posturing” used in this sentence?

Charles Murray tweeted this a few weeks ago: @charlesmurray: People who despise Trump (like me) need to be thinking through this issue. Thinking, analyzing, not posturing. https://t.co/jBBfEtBI4L ...
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What do you call a person who installs window panes?

When building a house, the person who puts up the framing is the builder, the person who wires the electrics is the electrician, the person who does the plumbing is the plumber. Who fixes and ...
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1answer
190 views

meaning of “pre-summoning evidence”

I read the phrase "pre-summoning evidence" in the Times of India newspaper (5 October 2015); it was describing something legal, but I am not sure about what may be its proper meaning. The phrase in ...
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Is there an American English equivalent for the British “moggie” for a non-purebred cat?

I'm an American (and fond of cats). I'm familiar with the British term "moggie" for a non-purebred cat--basically the equivalent of "mutt" for a dog. I've never heard any American English equivalent ...
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1answer
47 views

Units are proper or common nouns?

Are units like newton, metre etc considered as proper or common noun?
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53 views

Is it we “held a wake” or “we waked for his life”? [closed]

Can wake be used as a verb and a noun. I've seen wake used as a noun such as an event or period. "The wake will be on this date", "we will arrange a wake to show our thankfulness for having this ...
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1answer
47 views

The meaning of “earth” in 18th-century chemistry/mineralogy [closed]

Just today I came across an article describing origin of the name for Yttrium (an element in the periodic table of elements) In 1787, Karl Arrhenius came across an unusual black rock in an old ...
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56 views

Is the word “school” in the phrase “school of thoughts” a collective noun?

I know "school" in the phrase "school of fish" is a collective noun. Is it a collective noun in "school of thoughts" as well?
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52 views

noun phrase types

What are (1) [NP e], (2) control PRO; pro, other instances, and (3) 'e' in the examples? ('NP' here is actually a subscript in the paper) I'm reading Barbara Abott's 'Definiteness and ...
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2answers
123 views

Is there a suffix to form a noun from an adverb?

I want to know if we have a suffix which can be added to an adverb to form a noun. I have searched about that and I could not find anything about it.
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33 views

“There are/is(?) no [singular noun] or [plural noun]” Do I use are or is? [duplicate]

So I'm proofreading a translation that reads: There are no tactile paving or guide plates with Braille. And I can't tell if I should use "is" or "are". I could flesh it out and and say: ...
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3answers
56 views

One who is repulsed by / dislikes something [duplicate]

What would you call someone who dislikes, say, the taste of chocolate? They have a non-preference for it. '-phobe' doesn't seem to fit as it implies they want it to suffer or be destroyed, or they ...
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1answer
54 views

Noun meaning “compelling force”

I am looking for a noun that would refer to a compelling force, but I couldn't find a satisfactory one elsewhere. The word I thought of was "compellence," but that has other connotations. The ...
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1answer
51 views

Is it acceptable to use “blog” to describe a blog post? [closed]

I've seen people, including people who write for a living, say they wrote "a blog" about this or that topic, when they obviously mean a specific post. I find this incredibly grating. Dictionaries ...
2
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1answer
66 views

lower skill level than proficiency

I am looking for a noun which describes a lower level of skill than proficiency, a synonym for intermediate. A word that would fit in this context: conversational .... in Greek I am trying to say ...
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What is a word for a mad or insane explanation? Something offered as an explanation that makes no sense at all? [closed]

I am looking for a word that designates something as crazy but does not imply a judgment.
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1answer
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Why are nouns corresponding to verbs ending with “oke” written with “c”?

I was wondering about this for a while now. Could anyone explain this phenomenon or is it just "English quirks"? Examples: invoke/invocation provoke/provocation revoke/revocation
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what's the difference between “custom” and “practice”?

For example: As for what language to speak among family members in a certain situation there is the traditional practice to follow. As for what language to speak among family members in a ...
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5answers
160 views

A Noun which describes an ignorant person accusing a well-informed opponent of ignorance?

I am looking for a word which describes a blatantly ignorant person (not knowing much about certain topic) who in a debate accuses of ignorance his opponent, who knows more about the topic of ...
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2answers
73 views

Using Nouns or Gerunds

Could anyone explain when to use a noun or a gerund? Are these sentences correct? What is the difference between usage of gerund and noun there? I worked on the improvement of the article. I ...
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Hypernym for “necklace”, “bracelet” and “anklet”

Each is an item of jewelry that is primarily distinguished by the body part around which it is wrapped. Jewelry is too generic a term, since it would include earrings as well, which are not wrapped ...
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What is the difference between “sign” and “symbol”?

For example: A piece of meat with hair on it was a symbol of important events such as declaring war, a victorious army's return, or sad news. A piece of meat with hair on it was a sign of ...
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What is a word, preferably a noun, referring to a liquid that begins with M? [closed]

I am seizing up on this point while making an alliteration. All I found was: Moist - Refers to property of another material (a surface, the air, etc.) that involves liquid not the liquid itself ...
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73 views

Height and Tallness

We use the words "tall" and "high" to mean different things. A dwarf on top of a mountain is high but not tall. A professional basketball player in Death Valley is tall but not high. Note: I am ...