Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept.

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How does “pussy” come to mean “coward”?

The word pussy is often used to mean "coward". This guy is a pussy. and I am wondering why. How are woman's genitals related to being a "coward"?
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2answers
764 views

What is it called when a snake is showing its head when angry?

What is the apt word to be used when a snake has its head looking straight towards us and shows its tongue outside vociferously, probably when it is about to bite?
5
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5answers
2k views

“Hostname” or “host name”?

When we are talking about computers, I see both hostname and host name being used. Which is more proper? Should I put the space in there?
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2answers
1k views

A word for “one who tames wild animals”

I want to know a single word that conveys this meaning "one who tames wild animals".
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6answers
1k views

Does the word “newbie” have a negative connotation?

Imagine that I'm running a friendly and informal online business. I would like to introduce my service to the new customers by a blog post that entitles, 'Are you a newbie to XYZ.com?'. Will that ...
10
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4answers
5k views

Which word is used more in the UK: 'gaol' or 'jail'?

I know both words share the same meaning and pronunciation, but I wonder about their comparative usage in modern English.
0
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3answers
970 views

Verb after preposition

Is it correct to write this: "... rely on emulating techniques"? I must write the emulate verb in gerund because it is preceded by an preposition, right? The whole sentence is: These systems ...
0
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4answers
10k views

Capitalization for “Federal”

I'm writing an article for publication and I want to capitalize the following sentence appropriately. "You need to know that Federal law bars the lender from accelerating the mortgage on your ...
1
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4answers
418 views

More specific antonym to “lodger” than “landlord”

You can distinguish between someone who's paying for a room and paying for an apartment or house with lodger versus tenant. Is it possible to distinguish between someone who offers a room for rent ...
4
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5answers
2k views

What is the difference between “section” and “part”?

What is the difference between "section" and "part"? The Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English says for "section": one of the parts that something such as an object or place is divided ...
2
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5answers
1k views

Can we call something a “word” if it doesn't have a vowel? [closed]

It seems self-evident to me, but in the heat of a Scrabble game (no surprise), my opponent claimed that "sh" was a word. I think it's a diphthong, but the printed dictionary definition of "word" ...
1
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1answer
1k views

Meaning of “Blunt instrument” [closed]

I am having difficulties trying to understand this sentence: In some respects, Courses of Action are the more basic of the two. In and of themselves, however, Courses of Action tend to be rather ...
4
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1answer
1k views

What is the origin of “-ix” as a feminine variation?

Some words are made feminine by altering the suffix to be -ix. Examples: dominator → dominatrix executor → executrix rector → rectrix What is the origin of this variation? From my 5 years of ...
2
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2answers
2k views

Is there a difference between “ascendants” and “ancestors”?

Without noticing myself, I've mixed the use of "ascendants" and "ancestors" in some documentation I've written. In an arbitrary hierarchy (of either people or things), what would be the most correct ...
2
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1answer
590 views

Difference between “hypotyposis”, “ekphrasis” and “iconotext” [closed]

What is the difference between hypotyposis, ekphrasis and iconotext?
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2answers
227 views

Using the word “deadbeat” as an adjective

BBC quotes President Obama: America is "not a deadbeat nation", US President Barack Obama has said, as he warned Republicans unconditionally to approve a rise in the US debt ceiling. It appears ...
-1
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3answers
157 views

“Winter sales” vs. “winter discounts” vs. “winter offers” [closed]

We have a service, and we provide season discounts at this time of the year. Which of the following is the most preferable? The winter sales started at "Company X"! The winter discounts ...
2
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1answer
109 views

“To consolidate cost”

Is it correct to use the expression "consolidate cost" when you add cost figures in a specific period of time? The context is a description of what a piece of code is doing: consolidate cost over ...
0
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3answers
135 views

Synonyms for 'extra' (noun)

Recently I came across the word 'extra' in following meaning: "a person engaged temporarily to fill out a crowd scene in a film or play". I have a strong feeling that there should be some ...
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1answer
2k views

What is the appropriate usage of “attentions”?

I recently wondered what the difference between attention and attentions was, as I've heard both, but couldn't think of or remember when someone would use attentions. One definition for attentions ...
4
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2answers
187 views

When would I use “transience” vs “impermanence”?

I was looking for the translation of the German word "Vergänglichkeit", and the most suitable candidates from the contexts I looked at seemed to be impermanence and transience. I found the following ...
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4answers
876 views

“Music preference” or “music preferences”?

What is the difference between preference and preferences? Does it matter if one uses singular or plural in the following sentences: The effect of music on test-taking ability greatly depends ...
7
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2answers
804 views

Difference in usage between “expat” and “emigrant”?

Is there a difference in usage between expat and emigrant? I believe I encounter the former mostly in positive contexts, describing highly-skilled professionals ("expat guide to [country]"), and the ...
0
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3answers
4k views

Are there any specific words for the first events and first things [closed]

Are there any specific words for the first events and first things like the first rain, the first fruit of a plant, the first grey hairs, etc.?
0
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1answer
218 views

What kind of noun is 'splurge'?

I was reading a grammar book the other day, it was mentioned to omit articles "before names of substances and abstract nouns (i.e uncountable nouns)." The nouns splurge and howler are abstract nouns ...
0
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1answer
538 views

Other analogies similar to “flu and ”influenza" [closed]

Medically speaking, flu is a derivative of influenza; but in common usage flu includes colds and other flu-like symptoms. Influenza is a condition caused by specific viruses. While colds are also ...
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5answers
10k views

What is the difference between “clearance” and “sale”?

I want to understand the difference between clearance and sale. So are these words synonyms or not? E.g. Receive 60–90% off CookiesKids Clearance from Cookie's Kids. Receive 50–85% off After ...
3
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1answer
926 views

Is “subcopy” a word?

A copywriter just sent me over a copy deck that had the word subcopy to describe the text immediately after the page title. Up until now I had been referring to it as a description. Example: ...
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1answer
3k views

“Leader board” vs. “leaderboard”

Is there a preferred spelling for the word "leaderboard"? Should it be one word or two? It would seem that both are correct, but is either preferred?
2
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1answer
589 views

“Irony” vs. “happenstance”

If I were to leave my country because there is a high chance that I will get shot here, and then got shot in the country I immigrate to, would that be ironic or a happenstance?
0
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1answer
120 views

“Arm stroke movements” vs. “arm stroke motions”

I have the following phrase: This article analyzes freestyle arm stroke movements. However I wonder if using motions wouldn't be better: This article analyzes freestyle arm stroke motions. ...
0
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2answers
463 views

Noun for adjective “neat”

I need a noun for an adjective "neat" (or "cool") in the slang meaning "terrific". My logic tells me to use "neatness", but dictionaries don't seem to list the slang meaning for it. I don't mind any ...
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1answer
468 views

Hypernyms for “historic/archeological places”, “churches/temples/mosques”

We are building a travel app that will have categories of places like Wild Life Rivers Beaches Hill Stations I also want to have categories describing the following: Historic Places / ...
2
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4answers
9k views

Difference between the use of “resilience” and “resiliency”

I constantly hear people use the word "resiliency" (especially sports broadcasters and the like). I've always used "resilience" instead. Is there a preferred word to use in any given situation? As ...
2
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2answers
281 views

“Weeks of rain/raining”? “Weeks of fight/fighting”? Is there a rule to use the gerund in those examples?

It’s common and correct to use both after two weeks of rain and after two weeks of fighting. But since fight is also a noun, couldn’t it be used instead of fighting? Also, why rain and not raining? ...
3
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2answers
326 views

Sometimes the article precedes the noun and not the adjective

I have a question that baffled me for a while now, and I'd be a happier person for an answer. Why in sentences such as It's not that big a deal. And He was as nice a friend as you were. Or ...
3
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3answers
5k views

Are “flower” and “flour” always homophones?

Flower and flour are said to be homophones. However, considering the number of different pronunciations (/flaʊə/ like BrE sour, /flou(-ə)r/ like AmE sour, /flɑː/ (forvo) like BrE car, etc.) floating ...
0
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1answer
231 views

Exact meaning of “You are brand new”? [closed]

I run across a phrase of "You are brand new to GitHub" on the web. What makes me confused is the word "brand"; is it a noun, an adjective or an adverb?
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3answers
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Lexically recognized synonym for “humblebrag”?

As one might guess, a humblebrag is one who uses a pretense of humility as a vehicle for boasting. This word can be found at Urban Dictionary but, it appears, nowhere more authoritative. Yet, of ...
0
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3answers
693 views

For people, can you say “a British” like you can say “an Australian”?

According to Wiktionary, you can't use "a British" to refer to individual British people, though you can use it to refer to a race of people as a whole, but you can use "an Australian", and this ...
0
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1answer
83 views

Meaning of “pitches add up” [closed]

I would like to know the meaning of the phrase "pitch adds up" as it appears in this phrase from an article in Fast Company: None of [the applications] fit the bill, and the pitches add up ...
4
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1answer
698 views

“Work” vs. “working” (noun)

What are the differences between work and working when used as nouns? For example: Advocates claim that work/working brings a lot of benefits for young people. Which one is correct? I have ...
0
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1answer
125 views

What can “Think flow” mean? [closed]

I'm investigating a Tom'n'Jerry sketch for cartoonists, containing basic graphics and tips how to draw the characters right. Unfortunately I don't have a digital version. So the problem is with the ...
8
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5answers
318 views

What is the noun for “committable”?

I am coding a program and want to raise a signal whenever the data of a form is in a state that allows it to be committed to a storage. signal committabilityChanged(); However, I don't find the ...
2
votes
4answers
11k views

“The efforts involved” vs. “the effort involved”

…this we are doing proactively in order to have a better understanding at coming up with an estimate in case you want to know the effort involved. Should I go with "efforts" or "effort" in the ...
21
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5answers
13k views

Why does “corn” mean “maize” in American English?

I keep hearing "corn" as a synonym of "maize". This is widely popularized worldwide by popcorn. However, this is American English! In British English, "corn" can mean any type of "grain", especially ...
3
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1answer
492 views

Is “an archives” correct? If so, is it an exception or are there others like it?

A friend recently posted a photo he took of a sign at the LBJ presidential library that used the word "archives" as a singular noun. According to a Smithsonian Institution Archives blog post, this is ...
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3answers
358 views

Can we use “liaison” casually?

Then there was the Mad Russian, who made her laugh and behaved impossibly badly and proposed to her daily. Some other shorter-lived liaisons, now forgotten. Then Henry. — William Nicholson, ...
5
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2answers
998 views

More natural noun for someone who you chat with [duplicate]

I'm looking for a noun, that people would use naturally while refering to a person who they chat with – in the context of online chat. Imagine that you are looking for someone you could chat with. How ...
0
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3answers
209 views

Why police used as singular in this link?

With reference to this question Collective noun "police" — singular or plural? and as per my understanding Police is always plural. But I got shocked after seeing police used as singular ...