Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept.

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Term for buzzing or hissing sound often created by vibration

Specifically, I am referring to the hissing, buzzing, S-like, or fuzzy sound that is created when electronic speakers play sounds or music near their volume or frequency limits. I recall having ...
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3answers
7k views

“Measure” vs. “measurement”

Measure has a lot of meanings, but I am not sure whether it is or is not a partial synonym of measurement. Let's say that I have an algorithm, and I measure its execution time under different ...
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3answers
517 views

'The' article before the word plural

I have seen the statements such as the following one in some literature: "In the book 'XYZ' the word 'House' is never used in the plural." To me the word 'THE' right before plural seems very ...
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3answers
958 views

Can we call a person who loses things a “loser”?

Think > Thinker Draw > Drawer Can we call a person who loses thing a loser? Of course, I do not mean that they are not successful or failed but what should I call them?
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2answers
1k views

Deriving nouns and adjectives from place names

When describing people we often use adjectives based on their place of origin. (I'm asking about people only for simplicity.) 1) She is American. 2) He is English. 3) They are Canadian. You can ...
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7answers
2k views

How to use “new” as a noun?

In some languages "new" could be used both as a noun or as an adjective. I read that in English, "new" is only an adjective. Is it true? When I say: "a new", is it wrong? How else can I properly say ...
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2answers
250 views

Is “crevice” an abstract or concrete noun? [closed]

I can't find an answer to this question that my students and I are debating about. Is crevice an abstract or concrete noun?
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6answers
8k views

“Advice” vs. “an advice”

I have often heard that advice is uncountable and shouldn't be prefixed with an article. So I often force myself to say "a piece of advice". But I've seen it used with an article on a number of ...
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4answers
2k views

Why is “sergeant” pronounced “sargent”?

I remember when I first came across this word, I thought it was pronounced /'sɜr-dʒint/ (SER-jeent). Now I am curious as to why the first syllable is pronounced /sar/ rather than /sɜr/. I looked at ...
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2answers
821 views

Question about waffle terminology

What are the little wells (dimples?) called that occur in a waffle. These correspond to the raised areas inside of a waffle iron.
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2answers
2k views

What does ‘bookend’ mean in President Obama’s remark, “My address on Tuesday will be a bookend to what I said in Kansas”?

The Time magazine’s (January 21) article titled ‘Osawatomie Reprised,’ reported that President Obama said his address will "be a bookend" to his Kansas speech last month, in video previewing Tuesday's ...
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4answers
93 views

Name to distinguish between parameters used for 'is not equal' operations and those used for 'is equal' operations

I am writing a dating website (for example) which allows a person to search for partners matching certain features. i.e "non-blondes in New York". I am having trouble trying to find the perfect words ...
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5answers
458 views

How do I write consecutive numbers?

Today I wrote the sentence: The supplied definition defines 24 16-bit words per subframe, and ... I know the recipient will understand the terminology. I'm concerned about writing the phrase ...
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5answers
674 views

How do I address people who give feedback?

Do I call them 'Respondent' or are there better words to use? Example of the feedback as follows: ==================================================================== | Question ...
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2answers
183 views

“Ear doctor's” vs “Ear doctor”

In one of Stephen King's books titled "On Writing" he writes: "The next week my mother called another taxi, we went back to the ear doctor's, and I found once more lying on my side with the absorbent ...
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7answers
295 views

Word or phrase indicating incompetence or unsuitability?

This may be as simple as a synonym for hallmark, but with a negative connotation. An example: A security consultant publishes an article on security practices that is so egregiously erroneous that it ...
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6answers
298 views

A word meaning “going south to get north”

I want to describe a situation when to get a south bound route you need to drive north. I'm looking for a noun. A couple possible suggestions I've seen: "It is quite a bit of a diversion" and "It ...
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5answers
10k views

In navigation, what's the difference between bearing, heading, direction, and course?

Specifically, in real-world use, I would think that "course" and "heading" tend to imply a vector of movement, while "bearing" and "direction" might refer only to which way one is facing. I am ...
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1answer
363 views

Why are “homework” and “work” uncountable in English? [closed]

In Bulgarian both "homework" and "work" are countable. Why are they uncountable in English then? What is the difference in meaning that makes that happen?
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1answer
74 views

Step 1 or step1 when referring to a step? [closed]

When referring to a step, which one would be more correct between "see step 1" versus "see step1"?
4
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3answers
420 views

Englishman and British man

Why is it Englishman, Frenchman, etc. (one word) but British man (two words)?
4
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1answer
137 views

Can “few” be used as a substantive?

I feel doubts regarding the usage of few as a substantive. The sentence is: "Both kinds of literature are the product of the academic few." Is this correct? Now I want to place the adjective ...
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1answer
2k views

What is the plural of interrogative words (what, who, where, when, how, why, etc.)

If interrogative words are used as nouns, how are they pluralized? Example: This will answer your hows and whys. What is the correct form? whys (the same as most English words?) why's (following ...
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2answers
443 views

What part of speech is “atom” in “hydrogen atom”?

What is the type (adjective, noun, etc.) of the word atom in hydrogen atom? I think that atom here does not qualify hydrogen in any way and we can use it or not, and the meaning of the word hydrogen ...
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3answers
2k views

Is the word 'consort' still considered an insult in the modern usage?

In Romeo and Juliet, Tybalt says to Mercutio: 'Mercutio, thou consort'st with Romeo.' Mercutio replies 'consort! What, dost thou make us minstrels?... Zounds consorts!' Bloodshed followed shortly. ...
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1answer
886 views

Using 'the' in front of proper nouns?

This may be an incredibly stupid question but I'm having a bit of trouble with it. If I want to write: I transferred flights at the airport. Then I know I need to use 'at the' as 'airport' is ...
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3answers
2k views

Are/is “headquarters” always used as plural?

I'm studying Intelligent Business English, there is a question like this: ... The company has offices in six countries, but the -------- are in Brussels. a. headquarters b. main ...
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3answers
4k views

Alternative, more commonly accepted parlance for “currentness”

The following two sentences are identical: Ensure that X is current. Ensure the currentness of X. However, the word "currentness", while present in the dictionary, represents a very ...
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2answers
168 views

Term for an event being referred to by its location or date

Is there a term for referring to an organization by its city rather than by its name? mentions synecdoche and metonym as terms used when an organization is referred to by its location. Do these terms ...
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6answers
615 views

Word denoting short description of the event

Is there any English word having the meaning of short description of the event? It could be quote, saying, proverb or just simple sentence showing the real or hidden meaning of what happened. For ...
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4answers
443 views

“Combination” versus “Amalgamation”

I'm looking for the key differences between combination and amalgamation. The differences between their verb forms (combine and amalgamate) is just as acceptable to me. Combination: the act or an ...
4
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2answers
728 views

Is there a single word to describe a “young wizard”?

A wizard is an expert magician but there are some trainees (like Sabrina the Teenage Witch). I was wondering if there is a single word to describe an amateur or young wizard as opposed to fully ...
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3answers
16k views

What is the difference between “brain” and “mind”?

Could someone please explain the contextual difference of this two words? If I for instance say: I am using my brain to decide in what direction to move. or I am using my mind to decide in ...
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2answers
962 views

What is the difference in meaning between “proposal” and “proposition”?

These two words have similar meanings, however in certain contexts only one of the two can be used or is used most frequently (fits better idiomatically). Can you give examples of such contexts and if ...
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3answers
2k views

Why do we use the plural “heads” and “tails” when describing sides of a coin?

Head or tail sound fine to my ESL ears. What's the reasoning behind the plural usage? I looked it up on etymonline but didn't find anything interesting.
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4answers
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Is the word “granular” a synonym for the word “specific”?

I often hear the words "granular" or "granularity" being used around colleagues at my office to specify level of detail. For example: Does the running category have to be more granular? We ...
2
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3answers
111 views

“Two substances with plasticizer contents of B and Z, and C and Z respectively”

I have a problem with the word "content". I wish to describe two mixtures of substances: M1:A with plasticizer B, and M2:A with plasticizer C. Both mixtures contain a common third component, ...
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2answers
265 views

“Institution”, “body” or “organ”

I'm a non-native speaker active in a labor union that does not use English internally. The union has a representative assembly (made up of representatives of branches), whose existence is mandated by ...
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4answers
2k views

What can I call a person who directs traffic?

I'm referring to people in bright orange or green vests who direct automobiles. I thought of road workers, but it's not specifically around road work. Is there a word for "traffic-directors"?
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435 views

One-word nouns for preferred time slots in a timetable [closed]

I am developing a timetabling application. We invite constraints or preferences from teachers on what hours they can teach. Constraints can be invited for time slots as Exactly identified slots — ...
3
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3answers
1k views

Difference between “measurement” and “measuring”

What is the difference between the nouns measurement and measuring? Can I say the measurement has stopped the same way I can say the measuring has stopped?
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2answers
689 views

Term for second hand dealers

Is there a better term to describe second hand dealers (for electronic devices) and second hand dealers (for collecting newspapers and magazines for recycling)?
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5answers
812 views

When the reader sees the words “foreshadow” or “omen” does it usually mean good things or bad?

I'd like to use a word like "foreshadow", or a word similar to it, as long as the reader will understand what is to come is going to be good. Is the a subjective interpretation of "foreshadow" or ...
9
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3answers
319 views

Is there a word/term for a “super-contraction”

I am doing some informal research into dynamic speech and narrative generation, and I've been looking into some local colloquialism and having a little bit of difficultly classifying a set of them. I ...
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2answers
2k views

What do you call moving a word to change a sentence's meaning?

Prosodic stress is stressing different words to change meaning: I didn't take the test yesterday. (Somebody else did.) I didn't take the test yesterday. (I did not take it.) I didn't take the test ...
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6answers
8k views

Should “office mate” be one word or two?

Should "office mate" be one word, in the same vein as "roommate"? I haven't been able to find any reference that addresses this.
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4answers
2k views

What part of speech would “color” be in, “Mercury is the color red”? [closed]

Mercury is red. Mercury is the color red. Red is describing Mercury. What part of speech would color be?
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2answers
662 views

Is “shvisle” a real or made up word? [closed]

I've come across the word in this captchart: "Yo, my nizzle, can you pass me that shvisle?". Is it supposed to mean something? I've easly found the meaning of nizzle, but I'm at a loss with shvisle. ...
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3answers
287 views

Looking for a certain word

What do you call a person who advocates the use, against an enemy, of methods borrowed from that enemy, or applies the same moral standards as the enemy does or otherwise copies the enemy's behavior ...
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5answers
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Difference between “pain” and “ache”

What's the difference between pain and ache? I often see the two words used (almost) interchangeably. At the same time the phrase "aches and pains" is pretty common, and seems to suggest that the two ...