Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept.

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Difference between the use of “resilience” and “resiliency”

I constantly hear people use the word "resiliency" (especially sports broadcasters and the like). I've always used "resilience" instead. Is there a preferred word to use in any given situation? As ...
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2answers
273 views

“Weeks of rain/raining”? “Weeks of fight/fighting”? Is there a rule to use the gerund in those examples?

It’s common and correct to use both after two weeks of rain and after two weeks of fighting. But since fight is also a noun, couldn’t it be used instead of fighting? Also, why rain and not raining? ...
3
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2answers
318 views

Sometimes the article precedes the noun and not the adjective

I have a question that baffled me for a while now, and I'd be a happier person for an answer. Why in sentences such as It's not that big a deal. And He was as nice a friend as you were. Or ...
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3answers
5k views

Are “flower” and “flour” always homophones?

Flower and flour are said to be homophones. However, considering the number of different pronunciations (/flaʊə/ like BrE sour, /flou(-ə)r/ like AmE sour, /flɑː/ (forvo) like BrE car, etc.) floating ...
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1answer
230 views

Exact meaning of “You are brand new”? [closed]

I run across a phrase of "You are brand new to GitHub" on the web. What makes me confused is the word "brand"; is it a noun, an adjective or an adverb?
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3answers
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Lexically recognized synonym for “humblebrag”?

As one might guess, a humblebrag is one who uses a pretense of humility as a vehicle for boasting. This word can be found at Urban Dictionary but, it appears, nowhere more authoritative. Yet, of ...
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3answers
682 views

For people, can you say “a British” like you can say “an Australian”?

According to Wiktionary, you can't use "a British" to refer to individual British people, though you can use it to refer to a race of people as a whole, but you can use "an Australian", and this ...
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1answer
83 views

Meaning of “pitches add up” [closed]

I would like to know the meaning of the phrase "pitch adds up" as it appears in this phrase from an article in Fast Company: None of [the applications] fit the bill, and the pitches add up ...
4
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1answer
647 views

“Work” vs. “working” (noun)

What are the differences between work and working when used as nouns? For example: Advocates claim that work/working brings a lot of benefits for young people. Which one is correct? I have ...
0
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1answer
120 views

What can “Think flow” mean? [closed]

I'm investigating a Tom'n'Jerry sketch for cartoonists, containing basic graphics and tips how to draw the characters right. Unfortunately I don't have a digital version. So the problem is with the ...
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5answers
311 views

What is the noun for “committable”?

I am coding a program and want to raise a signal whenever the data of a form is in a state that allows it to be committed to a storage. signal committabilityChanged(); However, I don't find the ...
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4answers
10k views

“The efforts involved” vs. “the effort involved”

…this we are doing proactively in order to have a better understanding at coming up with an estimate in case you want to know the effort involved. Should I go with "efforts" or "effort" in the ...
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5answers
12k views

Why does “corn” mean “maize” in American English?

I keep hearing "corn" as a synonym of "maize". This is widely popularized worldwide by popcorn. However, this is American English! In British English, "corn" can mean any type of "grain", especially ...
3
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1answer
462 views

Is “an archives” correct? If so, is it an exception or are there others like it?

A friend recently posted a photo he took of a sign at the LBJ presidential library that used the word "archives" as a singular noun. According to a Smithsonian Institution Archives blog post, this is ...
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3answers
346 views

Can we use “liaison” casually?

Then there was the Mad Russian, who made her laugh and behaved impossibly badly and proposed to her daily. Some other shorter-lived liaisons, now forgotten. Then Henry. — William Nicholson, ...
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2answers
956 views

More natural noun for someone who you chat with [duplicate]

I'm looking for a noun, that people would use naturally while refering to a person who they chat with – in the context of online chat. Imagine that you are looking for someone you could chat with. How ...
0
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3answers
202 views

Why police used as singular in this link?

With reference to this question Collective noun "police" — singular or plural? and as per my understanding Police is always plural. But I got shocked after seeing police used as singular ...
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3answers
261 views

OED Appeals: Antedatings of “party animal”

The OED has made a public appeal for help in tracing the history of some English words, including: party animal noun earlier than 1982 When the OED added its entry for party animal, ...
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4answers
4k views

“Particulate” vs. “particle”

What’s the difference between particulate and particle? Should it be diesel particulates or diesel particles, and why? Could you provide three or more examples where it should use particulate rather ...
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4answers
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'Horeca', is it English? Alternatives?

In Dutch there's a quite commonly used word that denotes the commercial sector around selling food and beverages for immediate (or near-immediate, e.g. take-out meals) consumption: horeca. (This ...
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1answer
947 views

plural of compound nouns [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the plural form of “iPad 2”? When can an adjective be postposed? I'm curious particularly with iPod Touch and iPad Mini The plural would be iPod Touches and ...
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1answer
4k views

“Reward” vs. “award” vs. “prize” [closed]

Got the following from this link. Award (n): a recognition of a personal achievement, e.g. a scholarship for winning a science fair, a plaque for volunteering 100 hours of community service ...
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4answers
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In the sentence “My house is down the street”, which word does the adverb “down” modify?

My house is down the street. Does the adverb down modify is, or street?
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3answers
854 views

Where did the practice of using apostrophes for possessive nouns but not pronouns originate?

Where did the practice of using apostrophes for possessive nouns but not pronouns originate? For example, possessive nouns (both proper and common) are written with a apostrophe before the final s: ...
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4answers
148 views

Hypernym for the products from trees

I want to know a hypernym I can use to call products from trees. For example, mangoes, coconuts, oranges, bananas. I want to use this word in a context like below sentences. Mangoes are .... ...
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3answers
4k views

“Suggestion” vs. “proposal”

I am currently writing my thesis concerned with the analysis and design of data visualizations. For certain use cases my thesis suggests certain visual interpretations (to which I generally refer as ...
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5answers
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”Demand in/on/for something”

I am not sure whether to use in, on, or for after the word demand in the following sentence: The continuing demand on high-quality software that is reusable and easy to maintain and modify after ...
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4answers
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What's another word for Guinea Pig, i.e. when you call someone a “test dummy”?

If someone is being used to test a new product or idea, they can be called a "guinea pig" (because Guinea Pigs are usually used by medical labs for testing). What is another term that would carry the ...
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5answers
113 views

Alternative for “seats” in expressions such as “40% of the total seats are reserved for students of backward cast”

All of the leading educational institutes have 60% of their seats reserved for students of backward castes. It is a fairly common expression and a sad fact in India. What would be an alternative to ...
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2answers
98 views

“He knows his counterparts in each branch”

Can I use the word counterpart this way: He knows his counterparts in each branch. The context is that he works as the marketing manager in one of the company branches. And the counterparts ...
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3answers
1k views

What's the difference between “rigor” and “rigorousness”?

What's the difference between rigor and rigorousness? Which should I use in the following? Rigorousness and clarity are not synonymous in pedagogy.
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3answers
129 views

“Tipster” in real estate terms

I'm trying to figure out what somebody is called who gives you (or someone else) a tip on real estate brokerage. I've Googled (and Bing'ed ;)) along and found translations like "whistleblower" or ...
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3answers
2k views

Usage of the word “demise”

Is it appropriate to use demise in the following sentence: it is with deep sympathy that we announce the sad demise of ... It sounds archaic and I was not sure whether it was used correctly. How ...
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2answers
452 views

Hypernym for “day”, “month”, “week”, “year”

I would like to know if there is a single-word hypernym for day, month, week and year.
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1answer
130 views

Retire Vs Retirement

I am confused between the two: My father is due to retire/retirement in a few months and is restless. According to my understanding, retire sounds more appropriate. But I am not sure. Could ...
4
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2answers
681 views

Using the word 'kind' for a category

I found on englishplus (accessed on 23 Dec 2012) that the phrase 'kind of animal' refers to a category of animal. If you are using an expression like kind of, sort of, type of, or variety of, ...
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2answers
209 views

What is the correct term for “mince pies”? [closed]

I have always called mince pies filled with fruit just that: mince pies. However, lately I have been seeing many different variations of this: fruit mince pies, mince fruit tarts, and even mincemeat ...
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2answers
4k views

Etymology of “history” and why the “hi-” prefix?

According to Etymonline, history comes from the same root as story. If they are from the same word, where does hi- come from? Is it just because of the English habit of taking names from other ...
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4answers
476 views

“Dabbler”, without the negative connotation

According to dictionary, a dabbler is "an amateur who engages in an activity without serious intentions and who pretends to have knowledge". I want a word that means a person genuinely interested in ...
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1answer
161 views

Is “bulwarker” an acceptable word?

I'm well aware that bulwark refers to something used as a fortification or a defense. However, I was wondering if the word bulwarker is an acceptable word to use in English. I know it's possible to ...
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2answers
468 views

Has “mother” become politically incorrect?

Has mother become politically incorrect? The word mom now seems to have replaced mother throughout popular news articles. Is there some reason besides political correctness, which until now has ...
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4answers
1k views

Right word to describe “people working together”?

Please consider the below sentence: Dean Shrivastava and his __ of twenty faculty members took care of the classes. Which word of the below fits best into the above blank? a. Gang b. Team ...
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13answers
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What is a verb for “illusion”?

What is a verb for illusion? I want to use it in a sentence like the following: The optical effect [illudes] my perception of its real shape. But illude does not exist. But I cannot find illude ...
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12answers
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Is there a single noun in English for 'jerry-rigged?'

Gambiarra in Brazilian Portuguese means a device, solution, or means to an end made impromptu, usually in a sloppy way and lacking care. I was wondering if there was a single word in English for ...
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1answer
764 views

What is the correct name for 'soda'? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is correct: “soda” or “pop”? Is it correct to say soda, or is it pop, or is it soda pop? My friend and I are going back and forth: he says soda is "Soda ash" ...
7
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10answers
27k views

A more formal word for “tech-savvy”, relating to IT technologists in particular

Good morning. I'm struggling with formalizing this sentence: Online password managers are popular among tech-savvies. This is too casual--I would like a better word for tech-savvies, preferably ...
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2answers
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Difference between “presidentship” and “presidency”

What's the difference between presidentship and presidency? Please give examples to show the difference.
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1answer
267 views

I was able to hear the sound/noise from here?

Given this question: Dude the rock band was awesome. Which one of sound or noise is correct here? Yes, I know — I was able to hear the concert’s noise from my balcony. Yes, I know — ...
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9answers
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Word for “person that I supervise”

What is the best word to refer to the person that I (directly) supervise, in the context of a corporate workplace? The closest I can think of is employee, but that doesn't directly convey a direct ...
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3answers
158 views

What's the noun for an animal's personality?

When you describe a cat or dog's personality, what's the noun for it? "My cat has this personality of ..." just sounds wrong.