Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

2
votes
2answers
225 views

Do robotic insects have “antennas” or “antennae”?

I know that insects have antennae and machines have antennas. Which plural form should I use for something that’s both insectoid and a machine? Does one officially take precedence?
-1
votes
3answers
546 views

The state of not progressing [closed]

What is the state of not progressing called? Going in circles. When the person is not progressing despite the active trying.
1
vote
2answers
6k views

Words that describe the repetitive sound of machine [closed]

I'm looking for words that can describe the repetitive sounds that machine produces (For example an engine). Those droning, looped and long-lasting sounds. Patterned sounds of various parts of an ...
3
votes
2answers
433 views

Is there a word that describes a pre-wedding party?

So there are many words that describe the event that takes place before the wedding: stag do, hen do, bachelor party, bachelorette party. Is there a single word that encompasses all those things?
1
vote
3answers
645 views

Usage of the word “truancy” in a workplace context

I recently made this personal discovery of the word truancy. It means: the action of staying away from school without good reason I am wondering if there's a parallel to this word for workplace ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Origin of the word “Jellyfish”

Does anyone know the history of the word jellyfish and how it was defined and popularized? OED lists a usage in 1707, but that is referring to a gelatinous vertebrate fish. They start showing uses ...
2
votes
4answers
712 views

What does 'dispensation' mean in this particular context?

I was reading this article and stumbled upon this line First, presidential dispensation is useful, but it's not remotely permanent. White House occupants change. A more authoritarian chief ...
0
votes
1answer
259 views

Why do we pronounce “disease” like that?

What is the rule of pronunciation in this case? Why do we say like if there was an "e" in place of the "i"?
2
votes
1answer
80 views

Any (old?) print literature use of 'codecessor'?

Summary: Is there a (possibly old) print literature/use of the word codecessor? Background: I intuitively used the word assuming it exists in peer-reviewed publications first around 2008 only to be ...
1
vote
1answer
127 views

Hypernyms for restaurant dishes

Suppose I classify dishes in a restaurant menu. I would like to classify them by two categories: Category 1: entree main course dessert etc. Category 2: meat fish vegetables cheese etc. ...
3
votes
4answers
552 views

Acrylic vs methacrylate

A native Spaniard here, asking about what we call metacrilato — this manufactured product: What would you call it? I have seen use both acrylic and Methacrylate, maybe one of them is more ...
1
vote
2answers
4k views

Noun order: “He and we…” or “We and he…”? Similarly, “…him and us” or “…us and him”?

It's convention and polite to always list yourself last in a list. I say "John and I went to the store" and not "I and John went to the store." So does that mean that I should always list myself last,...
4
votes
10answers
1k views

Need a word for the inability to feel anger

I need a term for the inability to feel anger. Features desired: Single word Prefer connotations of incapacity rather than benefit Prefer reasonably clear specificity to anger More clinical tone ...
3
votes
2answers
269 views

Can a self studying college drop-out call himself a student?

I have dropped the college this year but I am still studying/learning without college using books and internet resources. WordWeb defines student as "A learner who is enrolled in an educational ...
6
votes
3answers
33k views

Isle vs. Island

Some islands are called isle like "Isle of Man", "Isle of Tortuga" and the "British Isles". Other islands are called island, like "Island of Malta" or "Island of Cyprus". What is the difference ...
1
vote
5answers
18k views

Why is “shrimp” the plural of “shrimp”? [closed]

When you talk about "shrimp" in the plural, there's no "s." However, how can you explain it grammatically?
1
vote
2answers
337 views

“Prodigal” vs. “spendthrift”

What are the differences between the words prodigal and spendthrift? They seem to mean the same. When does one choose to use one over the other?
-2
votes
1answer
501 views

explain the structure of “Ears Polite”? [closed]

"Ears Polite". How do you justify this construction?
4
votes
3answers
2k views

Singular nouns in plural form

Is the following sentence correct? There is a woods near our house. (I am talking about one woods, but it is a bit awkward to use "a" before "woods". Hence I am not sure about this.)
5
votes
4answers
304 views

What is the etymology of “[computer] terminal”?

I suspect it's something to do with the fact that back in the Olden Days of computing, a terminal was connected to a mainframe computer system, and thus a user would be sat at the terminal end of the ...
0
votes
2answers
67 views

The use of the term “absolutions”

I am curious as to if anyone else has heard of, seen, or used the term "absolutions." I purchased William F. Buckley, Jr.'s book The Lexicon a few weeks back, and this is one of the first words that ...
7
votes
4answers
3k views

What is the noun form of “erratic”?

Erratic doesn't have a meaning related to error. It means eccentric, or unsteady instead. Error has its adjective form as erroneous and errant. So what is the noun of erratic?
0
votes
1answer
129 views

programme or program [duplicate]

I am wondering which is the correct version? Furthermore, the official length of my programme of study: 3.5 years of full-time study and 16 weeks of internship. Furthermore, the official ...
0
votes
4answers
97 views

What is the noun for “marks you make on your book”?

I want a noun for "notes you take and marks you make on your book while reading"? Should it be "markups" ? or something better?
4
votes
9answers
1k views

What can you call someone who does not have a say in choices that completely affect him? [closed]

Something to call someone who doesn't have a say in the choices that affect him the most? Think 'a major stakeholder who has no voting rights,' ha!
-1
votes
0answers
57 views

One word for “opposite of 'sin'” [duplicate]

I have checked many dictionaries but there is no one opposite of 'sin'.
6
votes
2answers
4k views

“noun of noun” vs. “noun+noun”?

I wonder if there is a significant difference at the semantic or pragmatic levels in using the compounds structures noun of noun or noun+noun. For example, is it the same to say "the consumption of ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Pronunciation and meaning: “wind” and “wound”

I find it curious that there exist two words spelt wind ("a breeze" vs. "to turn") and two words spelt wound ("an injury" vs. the past participle of wind), and that the words in each pair are ...
1
vote
5answers
232 views

small sense of joy/novelty from shared (http) links

I know I saw a word a few years ago used to describe the small sense of joy/novelty/excitement we exchange when we send/receive cool links with others. Now, I can't recall the word, or where I saw it. ...
2
votes
2answers
216 views

standardisation of style; attributive nouns and Saxon genitives

In a recent thread, it was recommended that Academies' Trust be written as I just have done: Academies' Trust. Normal possessive apostrophe rules apply. If I accept this traditional style, I ...
8
votes
5answers
4k views

Is “stationery” the name of the store that sells pens, pencils, paper, school things, etc.?

In Brazil we call this store by the generic name of papelaria, something like "paper store". What is the correct name for this? Is "Stationery" the name in any country that speaks English? I read ...
4
votes
8answers
805 views

Using the word “coon” as part of a company name

I'd like you to ask if it's ok to use the word "coon" as part of a company name? The website isn't related to racoons at all, but has a racoon head in the logo. Will it offend visitors? As a foreigner ...
2
votes
3answers
97 views

Word for a frequent behaviour?

Don't know whether it's an English literature question or a psychology one but one may have witnessed a very frequent behavior associated with bosses or maybe teachers where they start asking you ...
0
votes
4answers
893 views

A “friend” friend? Is that ironical?

Here is a quote from the "Lois & Clark" series: A: Who are you? B [a guy]: I'm a friend of her ["her" is another female character whom B is looking for]. A: A boyfriend, a "friend" friend ...
1
vote
5answers
534 views

singular and collective noun for included computer source code

In software development, one often has multiple individual files that are referenced or "included" by others. What is the noun for each one of those individual files, and what would you call the ...
1
vote
1answer
435 views

Does an adjective apply to both nouns when joined with 'and'?

Can you grab the blue shirts and socks? Is the above sentence stating that both the shirts and the socks are blue? Or only the shirts? At this stage, I am leaning towards the earlier (only the ...
1
vote
1answer
154 views

Is it better to use a plural noun or definite article?

For example: Multicopters belong to a family of aircraft called rotorcraft, which also includes helicopters, and although they appear to be similar, the multicopter's design is mechanically much ...
5
votes
4answers
209 views

Word for an area characterized by similar stores, services, or industries

I am writing tourist information for a city that has areas known for similar shops (fabric, jewelry, musical instruments), similar services (spas, funeral, automotive), and similar industries (textile,...
2
votes
5answers
44k views

Word for “someone who talks too much” [duplicate]

What is another word for a person who likes to talk too much. I was thinking bigmouth, but bigmouth could mean "somebody who likes carrying messages voluntarily".
4
votes
6answers
27k views

Difference between “taxi” and “cab”

Definition of taxi: To ride or travel in a taxicab Definition of cab: A taxicab. Since the definitions don't show many differences, is it okay to assume that there is no difference between ...
1
vote
4answers
180 views

“Buildings” are to “blueprints” as “units” are to what?

I am creating an indie game and since English is not my first language, I would like some help on this. In my game, you have buildings and units (soldiers and such). The overall theme is militaristic,...
6
votes
2answers
68k views

Why can't we say “informations”? [closed]

Why we can't put the word information in the plural form? "Give me all the informations you've got", even if it's wrong, sounds more beautiful to my non-native ear than "give me all the information ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

Does 'rhythm' have one or two syllables? [duplicate]

Does the word 'rhythm' have one or two syllables? I'm wondering if there are any reasons for or against a sound-based argument vs a written-based argument.
15
votes
8answers
4k views

Why did jazz musicians start referring to an engagement as a “gig”?

Why did jazz musicians start referring to an engagement as a "gig"? If any, could anyone provide a couple of quotations from eminent authors to show where a word was first used in this sense? ...
1
vote
1answer
170 views

Grammatical differences between “curio” and “curiosity” when used as an object noun

I've recently heard the term curio when talking about a strange or foreign object, whereas previously I would have used the term curiosity in that context. Is the use of the use of curio a more ...
1
vote
1answer
320 views

Noun to use for a person who has commissioned work from a contractor

Let's say I'm an independent software developer who gets paid, by the hour, to create tailored software for solving one person's particular problems; I'm a contractor and a service provider. What's a ...
1
vote
1answer
285 views

Incorrectly transliterated foreign words that have been improved [closed]

Seeking a list of several foreign words (usually names, but any noun) that have been borrowed from other languages, but originally transliterated/pronounced incorrectly and are now being improved into ...
2
votes
2answers
111 views

Hypernym for “phrase” and “gesture”

Is there a hypernym for phrase and gesture — that is, a word for an abstract action of communication performed by a person? For context, I am looking for a term to use in a computer program, rather ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

What is the word that describes a person trying to sell stuff persistently?

I am trying to remember the word to describe a person trying to sell stuff persistently. I can't seem to figure it out. - It can be a verb, noun or adjective. Anything around "Selling stuff ...
0
votes
1answer
554 views

To make a noun to describe everything that is known well, would it be 'the well-known'?

Does the hyphen belong there? Thanks!