Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept.

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Plural possessive of category? [closed]

Example Sentence: The children of the category. What does category become in this format: The categor(ies|ies'|y's) children?
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643 views

“Bury” — noun meaning?

I would swear that years back I saw a definition of the word bury and it contained a noun, not only a verb. If my memory serves me well, the noun meaning was associated with church. Today I cannot ...
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3answers
844 views

Uses of the word “lyrics”

I don’t understand how to use of the word lyrics. I would like to know how it is used by a native English speaker. The Concise Oxford English Dictionary says: lyric noun (also lyrics) the words of a ...
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1answer
533 views

“Advertising” vs. “Advertisement” in US political commercials

This is the first year I noticed the verbal boilerplate at the end of US political commercials states: Group X is responsible for the content of this advertising. compared to what I recall (and ...
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699 views

“Blackness” vs “darkness”

I have been told that darkness is better to use than blackness; that blackness is not correct. But what about this intellectual giant Carl Sagan here (0:52): http://youtu.be/dj_MZ6i5Dr0?t=52s He ...
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1answer
264 views

What term describes the relationship between 'collectivism' and 'collectivisation'?

What is collectivism, in terms of grammar, of collectivisation? Put another way: Collectivism is the [which word?] of collectivisation? Another example word pair might be centralism and ...
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2answers
3k views

Why is “desperacy” not an English word?

I know one says an act of desperation, but I've heard desperacy much more than I've ever heard desperation, it's like I've almost never heard desperation. Why exactly was desperation preferred over ...
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2answers
427 views

How do you differentiate between a transitive verb and a noun?

I have several components in a piece of software I am working with and we want to select names that are nouns which describe the components. We have the following names: Automation Retrieval ...
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5answers
943 views

What's the meaning of boilerplate in programming?

I am not very clear about the word boilerplate when it comes to programming. How is it different to other similar terms such as template and prototype? I would appreciate some examples that clearly ...
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3answers
16k views

“Clause” vs. “phrase” vs. “sentence” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the difference between a phrase and a clause? Can you give me an easy description of the differences in meaning between clause, phrase, and sentence?
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1answer
105 views

What does ‘non-parter’ mean?

In the sleuth hound of 6, Wilbraham Place, Sloane Square, however, he speedily discovered that he had come up against one of the Untouchables, a man to whom even Oofy Prosser, that outstanding ...
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671 views

Is “nonversation” a word?

Is there a word like "nonversation"? Do people use this word in daily life? Where can it be used?
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340 views

“chance” as a verb in context [closed]

In the following text, is "chance" a verb or a noun? Very few did better than chance in spotting which was which. Could I replace it with "guess"?
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3answers
870 views

Pack, Package, Packaging, Parcel

I need to use a word in a warehouse. We need to know: capacity of package? type of package? price, quantity in package? However, I need to use another word to explain the material which is ...
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3answers
300 views

“Spell check” vs. “spelling check”

I can't remember the exact place I saw this (but I believe it was on another StackExchange site), but when someone was commenting on a software's "spell check" function, they said something to the ...
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1answer
1k views

Difference between “governorate”, “province” and “state” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What are: province, territory, protectorate, state…? Canada has provinces, the US has states and Egypt has governorates. What's the difference?
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313 views

How can one determine if the opposite of an agent noun exists?

We know that the employer employs the employee and that the tutor tutors the tutee, but how do we know if the shooter shot the shootee? Is there a simple way to determine if an agent noun can be made ...
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1answer
408 views

What is the opposite of an agent noun?

Is there a simple phrase to describe the object of an agent noun performing an action? The adviser helped the advisee. The employer fired the employee. Is there a phrase similar to "agent ...
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1answer
67 views

Are legs a choice? [closed]

Legs are a choice in that we could choose not to have them by cutting them off. Is it correct here to use the word choice meaning "an option"? Is it correct to say that legs are a choice I could ...
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1answer
695 views

Did English use to have capitalization rules similar to German's current rules? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Capitalisation of nouns in English in the 17th and 18th centuries I was looking up an article of the constitution of the United States of America, and I noticed in the ...
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2answers
150 views

Relic and relics [closed]

Reliquary is a receptacle, often made of precious metal and richly decorated, in which a religious relic or relics are kept, as a small box, casket, or shrine. In this sentence that I copied from ...
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2answers
176 views

“White” vs. “a white” vs. “a white person”

Should I say that "Will is white" or "Will is a white" or "Will is a white person" to refer to his race? Also, is it considered acceptable to say someone is black or white in a college paper?
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2answers
7k views

“Godness” vs. “goddess”

I've noticed people use (in speech) the word godness for "feminine god", e.g.: Oh my godness! However, in classic texts it is goddess, e.g. Shakespeare's "King Lear": Hear, nature, hear; ...
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1answer
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What’s the difference between “sauce” and “gravy”?

Possible Duplicate: Spaghetti and gravy For all translators I checked it means the same.
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4answers
251 views

Name for number format used in “Section 3.2.1”

Does that kind of numbering style have a common name or names? To be fair, it is really more of an "identifier" since it certainly not a scalar (one-dimensional) number. It isn't fair to call it a ...
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1answer
2k views

What is the difference between “dream” and “ambition”?

I don't understand how dream differs from ambition in the following quote: I don't feel like summing up my ambition as just a dream, but I do have an ambition. The ambition to restore my clan and ...
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“Implied” is to “explicit” as “implication” is to what?

I am looking for an antonym of implication that is related in the same way that implied and explicit are related, where explicit means "expressed". This antonym should also fit the following analogy: ...
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2answers
3k views

Different Meanings of 'Jumper' (Transatlantic embarassment)

I'm originally from Wales, now living in the USA, and as the cold weather is approaching I'm determined, this year, to start using the word sweater to describe the item of clothing I'm wearing, as ...
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1answer
842 views

“Pro-attitude” Definition

What does the word pro-attitude mean in the following sentence: Intentions are pro-attitudes, directed towards some future state of affairs. reference I couldn't find this word in the ...
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1answer
1k views

Should the word “commission” be used in singular or plural in these cases?

I don't know what would be grammatically correct, commission or commissions, in the following sentences: We will pay you commission(s) for each client you refer to us. You can track your ...
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2answers
128 views

Alternative for the word “options” as in “extra purchase possibilities to go with a booking”

Is there a better alternative to the word options when referring to "extra purchase possibilities next to a booking you have already made"? For instance, you can think of food and beverages, ...
3
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1answer
98 views

OED Appeals: Antedatings of football “header”

The OED has made a public appeal for help in tracing the history of some English words, including: header noun earlier than 1891 OED researchers have traced the history of header in the ...
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5answers
1k views

Why is “wavelength” one word when “wave height” isn't?

Why is “wavelength” one word when “wave height” isn't? As another example, wave speed is two words. But wavelength is only one word. What is the reason for this? In Swedish and other contructs, ...
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3answers
219 views

What to call the executor of an action?

I can't find the right word to describe the object that performs an activity/action. Doer Executor Performer Actor The term is to be used in an application where you may choose an "object" (from a ...
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1answer
122 views

Megafauna is to animals as what is to insects?

I'm aware of several species of "giant" insects, such as the Meganeura (giant dragonfly) and the Arthropleura (giant centipede) — but I was wondering if anyone knew of a loose term similar to ...
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4answers
993 views

What word can be used to describe someone you're following? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What’s a good word for a person that’s being followed? For example, a Twitter user can have many followers. Twitter refers to the users that another user is following as ...
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1answer
232 views

What will be the possessive form of the word “Tipsy” used as a noun? [closed]

The Microsoft Word grammar check shows "Tipsy's" to be wrongly formed. I thought "Tipsy'" would do the job and it was shown as correct. However, it occurred to me that Tipsy does not end in a 'z' or ...
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3answers
188 views

“Have another think coming” vs. “have another thing coming” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the origin of the phrase “you’ve got another thing/think coming”? If he thinks I'm going out with him, does he have another think or thing coming?
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What does “binder” mean? Why did it become a political buzzword?

I’ve been seeing a lot of “binders” in recent newspaper and magazine articles dealing with the recent Presidential debates. For examples: Time magazines October 19 issues carries the article titled, ...
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3answers
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What is the abbreviation for “state”?

Obviously, when I go to Google this or search virtually anywhere I get a list of state abbreviations. But I'm curious, what would the proper way be to abbreviate the actual word state?
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1answer
2k views

Is it derogatory to call user a punter?

I've been wondering whether it is somewhat derogatory to call a user a punter. For instance, We should encourage punters to participate in the discussions. Update: My apologies — I owe you an ...
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5answers
4k views

Difference between “opacity” and “opaqueness”

What is the difference in the meaning und usage of the words opacity and opaqueness?
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7answers
4k views

“Left” and “right” are to “side” as “front” and “rear” are to what?

Is there an equivalent word to "side" when speaking of the front or rear of something (e.g. a car)? So, a mechanic might say: You damaged your wing-mirror? Ok, which side? ... or... You ...
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5answers
849 views

Word for people who don't make their deadline

What is the correct word to describe the people who have not finished their work after the deadline? For the antonym, there is finisher, but I can't find *unfinisher in the dictionary.
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3answers
320 views

Do “lamb” and “ram” share a common etymology?

A couple of times, I've noticed Japanese people mistakenly use "ram" instead of "lamb". For example You broil lamb [correct] or mutton with vegetables. There are roughly two ways to have Genghis ...
2
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2answers
141 views

US English — “primary grains being produced” vs. “major cereals being produced”

I am correcting a Spanish-to-English translation that states, The primary grains being produced in the world are maize, wheat, rice, barley, sorghum and oats. I would prefer to use cereals ...
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4answers
7k views

“Parishioner” vs. “congregant”

I've always thought that the words parishioner and congregant meant the same thing and could be used interchangeably within the context of someone who attends a place of worship. Are there any ...
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1answer
979 views

What is the difference between 'framework curriculum' and 'curricular framework'?

I know that curricular is an adjective and curriculum a noun, but are they both used in exactly the same meaning? Or are there some differences concerning what they imply or apply to? Being a ...
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1answer
160 views

“Lesson” vs “unit” in books

I am so confused about unit and lesson in books. I looked up Longman Dictionary and it said "a part of book". What's the difference between them in this case?
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“Muppet” in American English

I see an event is being organised in Washington, DC, called the Million Muppet March. In British English, at least, muppet has no very positive connotations:- muppet (ˈmʌpɪt) — n slang a ...