Nouns are words that refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept.

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Incorrectly transliterated foreign words that have been improved [closed]

Seeking a list of several foreign words (usually names, but any noun) that have been borrowed from other languages, but originally transliterated/pronounced incorrectly and are now being improved into ...
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4answers
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“Cool water” vs. “cold water” [closed]

We often use "cool water". But can we use "cool water" or "cold water"? Which is correct? Examples: I drink cool water only. People always like cool water. In the above examples, ...
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682 views

What metaphor can I use for a collection of notes/facts?

I'm trying to come up with a metaphor that represents a collection of facts/notes around one thing. I've tried "deck" and "notebook" but they don't really work. Any ideas?
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Is downtown an adverb of place? [duplicate]

What is the explanation for why we say "I'm going downtown" instead of "I'm going to downtown?"
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Word to describe someone who rarely gets upset

Is there a word to describe someone who rarely or almost never gets upset/angry? The words that first came to my mind were non-confrontational and stoic, and though they relate, they are not exactly ...
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3answers
295 views

Can I use the word “hacker” as an adjective?

Can I use the noun hacker as an adjective? For example, can I write or say: It was a hacker trick. so that it means this: It was a trick of a hacker. And can I use It's hacker code. ...
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Using an adjective to describe something that is already intended

Is there a word that describes the case of using an adjective to describe a noun that already suggests as much? Examples the pretty model won all of the awards the smart genius answered ...
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290 views

Using the word “deadbeat” as an adjective

BBC quotes President Obama: America is "not a deadbeat nation", US President Barack Obama has said, as he warned Republicans unconditionally to approve a rise in the US debt ceiling. It appears ...
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plural nouns: should I add “s” ending to both nouns? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “User accounts” or “users account” “BookList” or “booksList?” Is it correct to say “lesson count” or “lessons count”? should a list of tokens be called a “token list” ...
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Difference between “governorate”, “province” and “state” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What are: province, territory, protectorate, state…? Canada has provinces, the US has states and Egypt has governorates. What's the difference?
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Difference between “premise” and “assertion”

I was preparing for the GRE exam, and was wondering what the difference was between a premise and an assertion. Any example which highlights the difference would be immensely helpful (something I ...
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What is the difference between sauce and dressing? [closed]

What is the difference between sauce and dressing? Their purpose seems to be the same.
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How do I address people who give feedback?

Do I call them 'Respondent' or are there better words to use? Example of the feedback as follows: ==================================================================== | Question ...
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“The committee has” vs. “the committee have” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is a company always plural, or are small companies singular? I have two statements like this: The committee has approved expenditure of hundred crores. The ...
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3answers
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What does “lemon on” mean in this context? [closed]

What does the phrase lemon on mean in this context? Is it an idiom? What is its correct usage? Excerpt from where I read this phrase: ... Hold on, for this deal, one that does not exist anywhere ...
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8answers
456 views

What is more appropriate, “data” or “information” when referring to facts about something. What's the difference really?

The Computer Studies teacher quipped, "There is a lot of data out there regarding HTML programming". What does this really mean? Will it make any difference if the teacher had used "information" in ...
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Though we use adjectives before nouns normally, why are some words exceptions like 'something'? Why do we use the adjectives after them? [duplicate]

For example: something , everything, anything, nothing ... special someone , everyone , anyone,, no one ... special somebody , everybody , anybody , nobody ...special
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Should ‘emoji’ be a defective noun? [duplicate]

In all of the descriptive dictionary definitions of “emoji” I've encountered thus far (e.g. Merriam-Webster entry), the plural of emoji is given an optional “s.” plural emoji or emo·jis In the ...
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“the rustle of tires” vs “the rustling of tires”: pompous or not, is there a rule, or is it random?

Scene: high school. Time: the present. A teacher went through a student's essay in which an out-of-the-way house in the sticks was described. It (the house) sat in the middle of a picturesque grove, ...
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2answers
217 views

Adjectival noun - singular or plural or both? [duplicate]

If I intend to use a noun as an adjective, can I use the noun both in plural and singular form? e.g. "noun modifier", "Bacon Batch", "A news reporter", "Sports center", "email address" My feeling is ...
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In “can hear singing”, is “singing” a verb or a gerund?

In this sentence is singing a verb or a gerund? Look at the children whom you can hear singing.
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Would you use the term “looker” to describe a man?

Both Merriam Webster and Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary define looker as a word used to describe an attractive person, usually a woman. ...
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“two kinds of” or “two kind of”

In the sentence: The two methods require two different kinds of prior information a colleague of mine suggests that it should be "kind of" instead. I was quite certain that the first form was ...
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when a noun is used as an adjective is it always singular, eg Event Request or Events request? [duplicate]

when a noun is used as an adjective is it always singular, eg Event Request or Events request? Service Request or Services REquest?
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“A friend of my father” vs. “a friend of my father's” — which one is right? Why? [duplicate]

I have seen them both in my reference book, which is written by a native speaker. I wonder why there are two different phrases to describe the same meaning and am looking forward to some reasonable ...
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Is there an English dictionary that distinguishes words as either abstract or concrete? [closed]

The words that express the tangible and visible things of our experience, such as sand or sea, are all nouns, as are those expressing intangibles such as love or idealism. Also, some nouns, like ...
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Where to use the word “tumbleweed”

What is the correct place to use the word tumbleweed? Can we use it as a metaphor for a person who always irritates us?
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Verb after preposition

Is it correct to write this: "... rely on emulating techniques"? I must write the emulate verb in gerund because it is preceded by an preposition, right? The whole sentence is: These systems ...
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270 views

Exact meaning of “You are brand new”? [closed]

I run across a phrase of "You are brand new to GitHub" on the web. What makes me confused is the word "brand"; is it a noun, an adjective or an adverb?
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Why police used as singular in this link?

With reference to this question Collective noun "police" — singular or plural? and as per my understanding Police is always plural. But I got shocked after seeing police used as singular ...
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8answers
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Looking for a more precise noun than “acceptance” [closed]

I want to express that someone who's renowned "has much social acceptance". But acceptance doesn't seem so close in meaning, I've seen another expression elsewhere, just couldn't find it.
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When to use inverted word-order like “great an option”? [closed]

I heard this in a movie yesterday: That is great an option! Why didn't he say: That is a great option! How does grammar desribe such inverted phrases? Where should I use this inverted ...
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5answers
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Abbreviation for “announcement”?

Is there a common abbreviation for "announcement"? If there is, what is it?
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What are the differences of store(n.) and storage(n.)? [closed]

Store ex: The store's inventory has to be entered manually into the database. Storage ex: Storage closet is where you will find all our office supplies.
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A situation when you do too many thing but achieve nothing [closed]

I am looking for few nouns describing "a situation when one does too many things but achieve nothing important or useful".
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What does the word “s***storm” mean exactly?

The definition of shitstorm in New Oxford American Dictionary: a situation marked by violent controversy. The definition in Wikipedia: a vulgar dysphemism for a chaotic and unpleasant ...