-1
votes
2answers
45 views

Is the following the correct usage for the word “read”: “Read a dictionary”

Is it correct to state: "Read a dictionary". Similarly can you "Read an encyclopedia",
0
votes
1answer
62 views

In “can hear singing”, is “singing” a verb or a gerund?

In this sentence is singing a verb or a gerund? Look at the children whom you can hear singing.
5
votes
3answers
152 views

What did “make love” mean in the 1920s?

This 1921 article gives "Ten Pointers for Domestic Happiness". Pointer V reads: Make love to your wife; continue to be her sweetheart. Neglect begets indifference that is fatal to married life. ...
4
votes
0answers
73 views

Are there nouns that embody adjectives+verbs? (Not asking about attributive nouns) [closed]

I'm not sure if there's a better way for me to word my question. I've sorted through "noun" + "adjective" search results here on SE, but found nothing approximating what I'm after. I'm trying to ...
0
votes
2answers
88 views

Do we “resolve a doubt” or “dispel a doubt”?

When writing in a academic setting (think of a letter to your professor), what is the most appropriate way of saying this? I will be grateful if you could resolve this doubt in your paper. I ...
2
votes
1answer
66 views

Connexion pronunciation & verb

Connexion is the original and variant spelling of "connection", common until at least the 19th century, and still occasionally used in British English (it was the house style of The Times of London ...
1
vote
2answers
59 views

Can “recount” in the sense of narrating a story be used as a noun?

I am starting to see the word "recount" used as a noun, even in the plural as "recounts", when the context makes it clear that this refers to the telling of a story (and definitely not something being ...
1
vote
1answer
71 views

What type of word describes someone who performs an action?

In English most verbs have a form that describes the person that performs the action. Some examples would be Runner, Climber, or Jumper. What are these kinds of words called? Are the called the ...
1
vote
1answer
206 views

Usage of the noun suffix “-ment”

What is a good rule for the usage of the noun suffix -ment? Is desirement as acceptable as achievement?
-1
votes
2answers
59 views

“UET is engineering a stronger Pakistan”, is it correct to say so?

For a local festival, my university - UET - has written a sentence on the entering gate, that reads as "UET is engineering a stronger Pakistan" According to my knowledge, engine is a verb, and ...
1
vote
3answers
87 views

Verb mix-up in a sentence

I have this sentence, and I have a feeling that the verbs and subjects do not agree with each other, and it continues to bother me. How can I fix it? Furthermore, both mates in a couple could also ...
-1
votes
2answers
63 views

The equivalent to pluralising a word?

To turn "pencil" to "pencils" is to pluralise. To turn a verb into it's 'associated' (?) verb is what? Example: "Lease" to "leasing", "look" to "looking". Is there a word for this? Or are the two ...
2
votes
2answers
58 views

Is it correct to write a noun once while listing two related (verbs) activities?

For instance, in the sentence: Without adding new items and modifying existing items. Would it be correct to completely remove the first reference to the noun items? as in: Without adding ...
7
votes
4answers
584 views

Why is “rollback it” incorrect?

I recently wrote the following sentence: Please roll it back. But if I were to describe the action on its own I would say: This rollback was due to objections by the original author. If I ...
6
votes
1answer
188 views

Can a gerund be modified by an adjective?

Is the sentence below grammatically correct? Good writing requires hard work. Or should it read: Writing well requires hard work. Can a gerund be modified by an adjective or must it be ...
-2
votes
2answers
192 views

Is it grammatically sound to group nouns/verbs sharing a preposition that governs the same object using an “and” multiple times in one sentence?

For example, does the below sentence violate any grammar rules? "Global Connections" will be showcasing internship opportunities, job openings and training programs at, challenges and issues facing, ...
1
vote
1answer
58 views

Is 'overreach' just a verb?

Reading an article on the New York Times website, I came across the verb 'overreach' functioning as a noun. I immediately looked it up on the net and apparently it's just a verb, so I wanted to know ...
0
votes
1answer
963 views

Looking forward to “ see” or “seeing”?

Which of the 2 sentences is correct? Sam is looking forward to see the Rocky mountains. Sam is looking forward to seeing the Rocky mountains.
4
votes
2answers
157 views

Nominalization of the phrase “the way they are normally represented”

In a past exam on technical writing, we were required to rewrite the italicized part of the following clause using nominalization, that is, turning verb phrases to noun phrases: "[...] this ...
0
votes
2answers
764 views

“Following a suggestion” vs. “taking a suggestion”

I am going to be following your suggestion. I am going to be taking your suggestion. Do they mean the same thing? If not, what is the difference between them? If they do mean the same thing, ...
-1
votes
1answer
39 views

Is *Network operator* considered singular or plural? [duplicate]

Network Operator pays Company X, and Company X pays Ringtone Provider Network Operator pay Company X, and Company X pay Ringtone Provider Which one is correct?
-1
votes
2answers
123 views

Can a regret be expressed? [closed]

I know that interest, dissatisfaction, condolence, apologies can all collocate with express, but I am not sure if regret can. I am thinking about the following sentence in particular: I would like ...
0
votes
1answer
119 views

Is 'subject' in 'is subject to considerable debate' a verb or a noun?

Every once in a while I stumble upon this phrase: ... is subject to considerable debate Examples are easily found on the web, for instance: In the context of suspected cognitive disorders, the ...
1
vote
1answer
69 views

What is the verb for “Glossary”?

Some software I am using has got the word "Glossarise" in it, which baffles me immensely. My spell checker hates it but googling for the word returns results for sites like Urban Dictionary but no ...
1
vote
1answer
75 views

To 'link' or 'relate' two items?

I'm developing a system in which users can 'link' separate items by using a 'Link' button. In the database, this 'link' is called a 'relation'. I'm inclined to change the text of the button to ...
0
votes
3answers
93 views

“Seek the truth in X” vs. “seek the truth with X”

Ran into the phrase to seek the truth in love meaning "seek truth without hurting others in the process". I feel it should be "with" rather than "in." No rule in this case?
0
votes
2answers
489 views

Is Working a noun or a verb in this sentence?

"Working for the man". Does "Working" act as a noun, verb or something else in this case and why? If I said, "I am working for the man." Then clearly working is a verb. However, I'm confused by the ...
0
votes
2answers
195 views

Was the verb “bring” once used as a noun?

In the book of Amos (KJV, Amos 4:1), we find the verb bring is capitalized in the middle of a sentence. This is in sharp contrast to the same verb written in v. 4 in lower case letters. Finding a ...
0
votes
2answers
250 views

Word for “collecting money for a special event from a group of people”

What is the English word for "collecting money for a special event from a group of people"? For example, say some friends are planing a party. Each one has to contribute some amount of money to the ...
0
votes
2answers
109 views

“Want to relieve from” vs. “want relief from”

Want to relieve from academic pressure. Want relief from academic pressure. I think the former one is more proper but my teacher said the latter one is correct.
0
votes
1answer
92 views

“Gained the academic title of professor”

I have a bit of a problem finding the right way to say/write the following: Gained the academic title of professor of xxx. Is the choice of gained fine, or should I use some other verb that is ...
16
votes
3answers
538 views

''Honey'' Usage Question

my friend (he's from Europe, white in his 20s) was in the U.S. a while ago and went to a diner a few times. A woman there (in her late 40s, most likely), kept calling him ''honey'' and ''sweetie'' ...
1
vote
1answer
90 views

Is this “debate” a noun or a verb?

Monday's vote opens the floor to debate on the bill and the Senate is expected to schedule a full vote by week's end.
1
vote
5answers
5k views

Word for “when somebody does something without realizing it”

I can't think of this word. It's when somebody is doing something but they don't realize they are doing it. For example: Suppose you're a girl and you are falling in love with a guy. When he ...
1
vote
3answers
249 views

To talk angrily and provoked in a low voice

I'm looking for a word that can describe a person continuously talking angrily as if fighting with someone, for example over a phone, but in a low and whispering manner.
0
votes
4answers
126 views

Growing abruptly and aggressively - words

How to describe a sudden increasing in size, volume. For example when fires grow suddenly and rapidly. What does that fire do?
5
votes
4answers
183 views

Word for “getting careless and slacking”

Can you suggest some words which can describe a person who is starting to get careless and who slacks, or the very action of becoming careless? A person who was efficiently and elaborately doing their ...
-1
votes
3answers
156 views

The state of not progressing [closed]

What is the state of not progressing called? Going in circles. When the person is not progressing despite the active trying.
1
vote
2answers
686 views

Words that describe the repetitive sound of machine [closed]

I'm looking for words that can describe the repetitive sounds that machine produces (For example an engine). Those droning, looped and long-lasting sounds. Patterned sounds of various parts of an ...
1
vote
1answer
327 views

Pronunciation and meaning: “wind” and “wound”

I find it curious that there exist two words spelt wind ("a breeze" vs. "to turn") and two words spelt wound ("an injury" vs. the past participle of wind), and that the words in each pair are ...
2
votes
5answers
5k views

Difference between “taxi” and “cab”

Definition of taxi: To ride or travel in a taxicab Definition of cab: A taxicab. Since the definitions don't show many differences, is it okay to assume that there is no difference ...
4
votes
3answers
565 views

What is the word that describes a person trying to sell stuff persistently?

I am trying to remember the word to describe a person trying to sell stuff persistently. I can't seem to figure it out. - It can be a verb, noun or adjective. Anything around "Selling stuff ...
3
votes
6answers
6k views

If I drive a car and ride a motorcycle, what do I do with a boat?

Once we have specific verbs to refer to the action of operating a vehicle, my question is: What verb should I use to "drive" a boat/ship?
1
vote
2answers
566 views

Noun+ infinitive + verb structure [closed]

In my grammar book I've got a sentence The woman to talk to is over there and this is the only example. That makes me believe I can say things like: -The packages to deal with will arrive tomorrow ...
-1
votes
1answer
102 views

“Flatly denied that he had copied” vs. “flatly denied the charges that he had copied”

The student flatly denied that he had copied in the examination hall. The above sentence is not correct, I found that it must be "flatly denied the charges that". Am I thinking in the right ...
0
votes
1answer
83 views

Does “approbate one's flaws” make sense?

I'm going for a little stronger word than accept and I like the word approbate. To approbate my flaws. Does it work?
-1
votes
1answer
69 views

Using 'show' with 'treatment'

Is it proper to say 'show special treatment' for example in "He showed him special treatment."? I know it sounds more natural to say, "He took a special interest in him because of his background." ...
3
votes
4answers
574 views

Religious use of “exegete”

I've noticed quite a number of religious professionals of late have used phrases such as "let's exegete this text" or "we need to exegete Paul's meaning here." Of course, an exegete is one skilled in ...
0
votes
2answers
237 views

What is the meaning of “gather way” in “The idea gathered way”?

As far as I know "gather way" means "to attain headway" in navigation. So I believe this is a kind of idiom or something like that. I just found this sentence with no context, so I don't know if you ...
-2
votes
2answers
610 views

“hanging on the rope of”

I'm looking for two single words, a verb and a noun, with similar content, which could be best inserted in these sentences: In some countries workers are entirely _______ 1 of/to/on their ...