1
vote
1answer
64 views

Is there a term to describe the tendency to do what's minimum?

I will try my best to describe. Some times, I have found that people tend to do the minimum procedures to finish what they do, and find improving unnecessary. I understand different people have ...
6
votes
6answers
837 views

Why does the following phrase sound old fashioned?

"We went swimming later in the afternoon, Jack and I." I am trying to describe what is happening here by breaking the sentence down into it's basic components, but I am having difficulty doing this. ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

Is “right to collect” a phrase that acts as a noun?

Some business folks have asked us to name an "entity" as "Right to Collect." We need entity names to be nouns. To me "Right to Collect" doesn't sound like a noun. What would you best describe this ...
-1
votes
1answer
57 views

What is the difference about two sentences below?

What is the difference about two sentences below? 1.Despite a very old medical therapy, acupuncture is called "new age" treatment. 2.Despite being a very old medical therapy, acupuncture is called ...
0
votes
1answer
129 views

'the cleanest' vs 'cleanest': article-containing adverb phrases?

We have two phrases structures: 'the nicest in my school' 'the cleanest in my house' These phrases can act as nouns or adverbs: 'He is the nicest in my school.' - noun phrase. 'She cleaned the ...
0
votes
3answers
232 views

Does “code of conduct” mean the same as “code of ethics”?

I have tried with many dictionaries to search for a synonym of the phrase “code of conduct”. I wonder if it has the same meaning as “code of ethics”. Your help is much appreciated.
0
votes
1answer
119 views

Is 'subject' in 'is subject to considerable debate' a verb or a noun?

Every once in a while I stumble upon this phrase: ... is subject to considerable debate Examples are easily found on the web, for instance: In the context of suspected cognitive disorders, the ...
4
votes
2answers
282 views

What is a “mock euphemism?”

I have to make flashcards for my AP Lang class, but I can't find what a "mock euphemism" is anywhere. Can anyone help?
-1
votes
2answers
604 views

To work under the advisory of?

I want to describe my current research-assistant position saying that "I work under the advisory of John Green". Is this the correct way of saying that my advisor is John Green? If not, what is the ...
5
votes
7answers
349 views

An old fashioned word or phrase that describes a meditative walk

An old fashioned word or phrase that describes a meditative walk. It's not a constitutional but it's something that Ben Franklin, or Thomas Edison would do to clear their mind, rejuvenate, reconnect, ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

“Useless like tits on a log” vs. “tits on a bull” vs. “tits on a turtle” and so forth

I was reading an online book and there was the expression "useless like tits on a log". I googled to find more about this expression and I found a similar one: "useless like tits on a bull". Which ...
5
votes
6answers
754 views

“Do a shop” for “go shopping”

This has puzzled me for a few years now. When preceded by 'a', shop becomes a noun. Does "do a shop" even make sense then? The correct phrase for me was always "go shopping", or similar. Can ...
7
votes
11answers
645 views

Noun (or alternative) of thought-provoking?

I'm planning to start a blog. And before every post, I'm planning to add how thought-provoking I think that post is. So I was thinking about something that I can call thought-provoking-ness level. ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Is “cattle herds” grammatical? [closed]

I know that "a herd of cattle" and "many herds of cattle" are correct, but what about "cattle herds"? For example, We drove by cattle herds. Is that grammatical?
4
votes
3answers
927 views

Turning 'free of charge' into a noun phrase

I am helping a PhD student who makes constant reference to an Internet application he is studying by using a string of noun phrases, specifically ...its ease of use, general applicability and ...
1
vote
2answers
698 views

Is “shvisle” a real or made up word? [closed]

I've come across the word in this captchart: "Yo, my nizzle, can you pass me that shvisle?". Is it supposed to mean something? I've easly found the meaning of nizzle, but I'm at a loss with shvisle. ...
8
votes
4answers
713 views

Killer Queen. The usage of noun sequences of length two and more. Ambiguity of nouns phrases in English

I have a question about nouns triplets like "sofa box container" and I'll formulate it at the end. I have some reasoning and I want to make sure I'm correct. First of all consider the following ...
9
votes
1answer
274 views

How come “John is friends with Jane”?

The usage in the question title seems common enough to me, though it may be more common in Britain. But I can't exactly see what "part of speech" the word friends is here, and I can't come up with ...
2
votes
1answer
314 views

“List of tasks” or “tasks' list”

Which of these forms is better: list of tasks or tasks' list? Another question is whether I should use an apostrophe or not (tasks's list vs tasks list). Other phrases which are similar to this, but ...
15
votes
6answers
3k views

What's the most accurate term for phrases such as “storm in a teacup” and “making mountains out of molehills”?

Are phrases such as "storm in a teacup" and "making mountains out of molehills" best described by one of these terms: anecdote proverb saying expression metaphor If not, which term is the right ...
1
vote
1answer
682 views

What does “cavernous room” mean or look like?

I saw this phrase used in this New Yorker article. I think I understand it intuitively, especially with the help of google images, but I'd like to know for sure.
5
votes
3answers
477 views

Is it common to use the borrowed noun-adjective form for borrowed French phrases?

Lately, something has struck me. I've been hearing several expressions in English, some clearly borrowed from French and preserving their noun-adjective form. Some examples are: Attorney General ...
1
vote
1answer
696 views

Is the usage of “after the break” before the start of a commercial and in an article related?

The phrase "after the break" is sometimes used before a commercial. It can also used in an article. e.g. "watch the video after the break". Are these two usages related to each other, apart from ...
4
votes
3answers
214 views

Can “run-through” be possibly a noun?

Can "run-through" be possibly a noun? Is it possible at all? If yes, can you, please, come up with a sentence that would contain this noun? Can you also, please, describe a situation, in which that ...
4
votes
4answers
4k views

Meaning of “flip the script”

I’ve heard the phrase “flip your script” or “flip the script” in various hip-hop songs. What does it mean?
20
votes
5answers
27k views

What is the origin of the phrase “I'll take a raincheck”?

What is the origin of the phrase I'll take a raincheck?